Can anyone be a trainer?:

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Can anyone be a trainer?:

  1. 1. Can anyone be a trainer?: towards a more embedded role for vocational trainers Professor Lorna Unwin Institute of Education University of London For more information see http:// learningaswork . cardiff.ac.uk
  2. 3. Research Methods <ul><li>Multi-sector study of relationship between learning in the workplace, the organization of work and performance </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative methods – interviews, ‘work shadowing’, observation, photo elicitation Quantitative – surveys of employees, ‘learning logs’, development of ‘better’ survey questions </li></ul>
  3. 4. Importance of Context for Learning <ul><li>Learning in the workplace arises from everyday workplace activity plus specific need (e.g. technological change) </li></ul><ul><li>Learning can be deliberate, unplanned, individual or collaborative, incidental, productive, subversive </li></ul><ul><li>Workplace context shapes the learning environment </li></ul>
  4. 6. Worlds within Worlds: Locating Work within its Productive System <ul><li>Organisations operate within productive systems </li></ul><ul><li>External regulation from government, EU, professional bodies, owners </li></ul><ul><li>Ownership - foreign, stock market, family, self-employed </li></ul><ul><li>Role of customers and supply chains </li></ul>
  5. 7. The Workplace as a Learning Environment <ul><li>Workplaces are structured environments – can be analysed on an ‘expansive-restrictive continuum’ </li></ul><ul><li>Learning treated as homogenous ‘good’ - subversion, complacency, bad practice ignored </li></ul><ul><li>Learning anchored in and manipulated by context </li></ul><ul><li>Managers crucial to supporting and sustaining learning </li></ul>
  6. 8. Software Company – Managers as ‘Teachers’ <ul><li>HQ is ‘mother ship’ - all training in-house and largely ‘on-the-job’ - rotating teams </li></ul><ul><li>Intensive performance review process - 3, 6 and 9 months for newcomers - every 9 months for all </li></ul><ul><li>After first year, an engineer becomes mentor for newcomer, demonstrates ‘teaching’ skills and progresses to managing up to 5 people </li></ul>
  7. 9. Using Artefacts to Stimulate Learning in an Automotive Plant <ul><li>Large group of production Operatives selected to act as ‘tutors’ to new employees </li></ul><ul><li>Designed a ‘live’ tutor pack – available across the factory - workers added new information/ideas to packs </li></ul><ul><li>Built on shared occupational/organisational language </li></ul><ul><li>Artefacts generated as part of everyday activity to stimulate and expose/illuminate learning </li></ul>
  8. 10. Implications for Policy and Practice <ul><li>Role of the ‘trainer’ increasingly fluid </li></ul><ul><li>Employees assist each other as part of everyday work activity – young people (e.g. apprentices) can help older workers </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogical techniques need to be part of every employee’s skill set </li></ul><ul><li>employers need help to create more effective learning environments </li></ul>

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