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Cognitive ARTifactsExamining sociocultural and cognitive dimensions in STS practicesthrough urban subcultures, as a basis ...
General Problem StatementFor many years, the importance of cognitive artifacts – artificial devices designedto serve a rep...
The Cognitive-Computer ArtifactA cognitive artifact is an artificial device designed to maintain, display, oroperate upon ...
The RepresentationGesturing is a robust phenomenon, foundacross cultures, ages, and tasks. SusanGoldin-Meadow examines the...
The Representing WorldThe computer interface provides userswith ways to generate representationsof their world. More speci...
Displays of the Representing WorldSusan Goldin-Meadow suggests thatgestures (artifacts) serve both as a toolfor communicat...
Graffiti Research & Software Design The letter "s", one of the more  commonly written letters in  graffiti –this simple, ...
Communities of Practice A recent academic study of  graffiti crews in southern  Mexico City reveal certain  characteristi...
Shared Repertoires Effective community design is  built on the collective  experience of community  members. Only an insi...
Free Culture & Open InnovationEyeWriter enabled disabled graffitiartist TEMPT1 (Tony Quan) tocontribute work to “Getting U...
Cogntive ARtifacts Presentation
Cogntive ARtifacts Presentation
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Cogntive ARtifacts Presentation

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Fall semester 2011 class presentation.

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Cogntive ARtifacts Presentation

  1. 1. Cognitive ARTifactsExamining sociocultural and cognitive dimensions in STS practicesthrough urban subcultures, as a basis for researching new modes/modelsthat construct meaning.CS 7697 Cognitive Models of Science and TechnologyInvestigator: Nettrice R. Gaskins
  2. 2. General Problem StatementFor many years, the importance of cognitive artifacts – artificial devices designedto serve a representational function – and their use to enhance human abilities hasbeen ignored within much of cognitive science despite earlier scientific inroads.Cognitive scientists have paid little attention to how artifacts are invented,acquired, or transmitted across individuals or generations, especially in groupsoutside of accepted criterion applied in a particular branch of learning.
  3. 3. The Cognitive-Computer ArtifactA cognitive artifact is an artificial device designed to maintain, display, oroperate upon information in order to serve a representational function.
  4. 4. The RepresentationGesturing is a robust phenomenon, foundacross cultures, ages, and tasks. SusanGoldin-Meadow examines the gesture when itstands on its own, substituting for speech andclearly serving a communicative function.Here, artist/performer Doze Green performsthe motion of an “s,” a modal symbol (analogrepresentation) that retains perceptual aspectsof all "s" letter forms, such as the generaloutline shape.Gesture-based technologies and interfaces canre-engage the use of the body, i.e. hands, aswell as the eye. Green also uses other parts ofhis body to perform symbolic gestures.
  5. 5. The Representing WorldThe computer interface provides userswith ways to generate representationsof their world. More specifically, thispaper investigates the virtual creationof symbolic or representationalgestures and movement of the body inphysical space.Graffiti Analysis demonstrates the “rawform of human motion with code ontop,” as a data visualization. The linequality is based on speed; the fasterthe user moves or gestures the thinnerthe line gets.
  6. 6. Displays of the Representing WorldSusan Goldin-Meadow suggests thatgestures (artifacts) serve both as a toolfor communication for listeners, and atool for thinking for speakers.There are several ways in whichartifacts display the virtual world,including the presentation of a virtualobject, iconic representation, or worldupon which operations are performed,eventually to be reflected or overlaidonto real objects – where they can beread by others.
  7. 7. Graffiti Research & Software Design The letter "s", one of the more commonly written letters in graffiti –this simple, single line gesture shows the way hundreds of different writers all treat the letter to see the diversity of thought and intent in a community of practice. When disabled graffiti artist TEMPT1 creates a letter with the motion of his eyes he is, in fact, constructing modal representations that reactivate parts of his brain that recall experiences when he was able bodied, in his graffiti crew in Los Angeles.
  8. 8. Communities of Practice A recent academic study of graffiti crews in southern Mexico City reveal certain characteristics with gangs or urban tribes, but more with „„communities of practice‟‟: they live in the „„figured world‟‟ of graffiti, a community of practice at the local and global level. Through participation, group members learn the language, technical and social skills, and values of this figured world.
  9. 9. Shared Repertoires Effective community design is built on the collective experience of community members. Only an insider can appreciate the issues at the heart of the domain, the knowledge that is important to share, the challenges their field faces, and the latent potential in emerging ideas, tools and techniques. This requires more than community "input." It requires a deep understanding of community issues.
  10. 10. Free Culture & Open InnovationEyeWriter enabled disabled graffitiartist TEMPT1 (Tony Quan) tocontribute work to “Getting Upper,” aposter project and exhibition thatexamines how typography, languageand communication continue to affectand be infected by theories arounddeconstruction and the visualexperience of graffiti and streetart. This work was recently on view atthe Pasadena Museum of CaliforniaArt.

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