Nethood Tlabs09 Berlin

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Nethood Tlabs09 Berlin

  1. 1. Bridging the virtual with the physical space Panayotis Antoniadis (joint work with Ileana Apostol and Tridib Banerjee) T-Labs Networking Lecture Series July 2009 Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  2. 2. Outline  The NetHood vision  Current practice  Research agenda  Incentive mechanisms and social software 1
  3. 3. Together we stand …  Social networks  Information  Knowledge  Content  Resources 2
  4. 4. … divided we fall  Do you know your neighbors?  Social capital? Anonymity  Conviviality? Alienation  Civic engagement? Fear  Collective action?  Plenty of room for improvement! 3
  5. 5. NetHood From facebook to face-block 4
  6. 6. NetHood ingredients  Pick at least two  Neighborhood community  On-line community  P2P system  User-owned WMN  Cross-discipline research and practice  NetHood social software 5
  7. 7. Neighborhood communities 6
  8. 8. Vancouver Neighborhood Ecovillage
  9. 9. SozialeStadt in Berlin, Friedrichshein
  10. 10. Hybrid communities 9
  11. 11. In the city 10
  12. 12. In the neighborhood 11
  13. 13. In the building 12
  14. 14. P2P systems: resource sharing 13
  15. 15. P2P systems: resource sharing+social 14
  16. 16. User-owned networks 15
  17. 17. Neighbourhood/City Wireless Mesh networks 16
  18. 18. Grassroots community wireless networks “Seattle Wireless started in 2000, and back then it was a simple idea, with huge technical hurdles, high costs and a hard (but novel) sell to the public. Now the technology exists, the hardware is cheap, and all we need are people to realize the dream of a locally grown network.” 17
  19. 19. Different layers of cooperation required! Social selfish Application or (Resource sharing) altruistic? Network Access Physical
  20. 20. Challenge #1: Common interest  Community identity  Attention  Critical mass  Research  Social software design: bridge the virtual with the physical  Community representation  Incentive mechanisms: Participation 19
  21. 21. Trade-off: Inherent diversity  Acceptance  Compromise  Curiosity  Research  E-democracy  Aggregation into collective outcome  Customization, adaptation over time 20
  22. 22. Challenge #2: Privacy  Information sharing  Information exposure  Anonymity  Research http://www.flickr.com/photos/nnova/3455407624  P2P implementation  Private vs. public  Incentive mechanisms: Trust 21
  23. 23. Challenge #3: Independence  Self-organized network  Freedom of expression  Public goods  Research  Wireless mesh networking: performance, interference, …  Political perspective  Incentive mechanisms: Resource sharing 22
  24. 24. Trade-off: Critical mass http://www.flickr.com/photos/manganite/173253613/ 23
  25. 25. Challenge #4: Incentives  Motivations are required for  Participation  Time  Trust  Resource sharing  Inherent asymmetries  Topology  Capabilities  Motivations 24
  26. 26. More trade-offs  Participation vs. addiction  Accountability vs. anonymity  Extrinsic vs. intrinsic motivations (crowding- out)  Sophisticated rules vs. ease of use 25
  27. 27. NetHood principles  Cross-layer  Cross-discipline  The details matter  From practice to theory  More than Internet access  Customization  Incentives: from economics to social psychology 26
  28. 28. Extrinsic vs. intrinsic motivations  Direct benefits  Payments, resource exchange  Long-term benefits  Feedback, expected reciprocity, socializing  Self-image  Sense of efficacy, pride, status, popularity  Community  Community spirit, belonging, norms  Intrinsic  Interest, fun, inherent satisfaction 27
  29. 29. Internet access sharing: reciprocity 28
  30. 30. Internet access offering http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/2006/06/can-you-tell-us-1.php 29
  31. 31. Thank you 30
  32. 32. Other incentives … 31
  33. 33. Idea: Cross-layer incentive mechanisms Social Visibility Acknowledgement Status Privileges Relationships/Trust Application punishment Resource sharing Network reward Packet forwarding Physical & reciprocity access Media access
  34. 34. Key concept: social software  HCI + information management + rules  Profile page (self-representation)  Information management (private vs. public info)  Status/privileges (characterizations, moderators)  Feedback (view count, favourites, text, history, events)  Community (outcome, groups, forums, support)  Socializing (private messages, friendship)  User participation (web2.0)  Adaptation over time 33
  35. 35. Successful stories  Myspace  Facebook  Flickr  Wikipedia  Slashdot  But also many unsuccessful …  The details matter! 34
  36. 36. Research agenda  Technology-aware social software  P2P implementation  Modelling and formalization  Resource sharing as an enabler for community building? 35
  37. 37. More research questions Computer science  Wireless networking and p2p implementation  Performance  Cross-layer issues  Resource control and monitoring  Flexibility for contribution  Resource sharing visualization  Trust  Key management  Exploit special characteristics 36
  38. 38. More research questions Urban planning  Bridging the virtual with the physical  Virtual  physical (terminals, events, symbolic elements)  Physical  virtual (space representation, identity)  Building common interest and community identity  Discovering the soul of a community (e-flanerie)  Feedback collection and analysis  Places on the net  Understand the notion of place in the virtual space  Place-oriented social software design 37
  39. 39. Summary  Cross-disciplinary work is necessary  Easy to say but …  From practice to theory  Difficult to publish :-)  Keep in touch:  http://www.nethood.org (under construction) 38
  40. 40. No matter how hard we try we cannot escape reality :-) http://www.flickr.com/photos/bekathwia/2462986853/ 39
  41. 41. APPENDIX Social software details 40
  42. 42. Vision, promise A free encyclopedia  Free content  Free software  “Picture the world” 41
  43. 43. Community outcome 42
  44. 44. Personal image (external) 43
  45. 45. Personal image (external) 44
  46. 46. Personal image (external) 45
  47. 47. Feedback (local activity) 46
  48. 48. Feedback (local activity) 47
  49. 49. Feedback (local activity) 48
  50. 50. Follower, contact or friend? 49
  51. 51. User interactions 50
  52. 52. Feedback (contribution) 51
  53. 53. Entering the flow … 52
  54. 54. Filtering/rating 53
  55. 55. Filtering/rating 54
  56. 56. Space representation
  57. 57. Space representation
  58. 58. Space representation
  59. 59. Technology-aware social software Examples  User profile  A technologically enhanced social image of the user  Personal feedback for resource contribution  From the system, from neighbors  Visualization  Socialization  “My network friends”  Sense of community  “Our network” 58
  60. 60. Related publications I. Apostol, P. Antoniadis, and T. Banerjee. Flânerie between Net and Place: Possibilities for Participation in Planning, Under publication in the Journal of Planning Education and Research (JPR). I. Apostol, P. Antoniadis, and T. Banerjee. Places on the Net. 14th International Conference on Urban Planning and Regional Development in the Information Society, Cities 3.0, Barcelona, April 2009. I. Apostol, P. Antoniadis, and T. Banerjee. From Face-Block to Facebook or the Other Way Around?”, International workshop on Sustainable City and Creativity, Naples, September 2008. P. Antoniadis. “Incentives for resource sharing in ad hoc networks: going beyond rationality”. Book Chapter. In Boon-Chong Seet (ed.) Mobile Peer-to-Peer Computing for Next Generation Distributed Environments. To appear. P. Antoniadis, B. Le Grand, A. Satsiou, L. Tassiulas, R. Aguiar, J.P. Barraca, and S. Sargento.“Community building over Neighborhood Wireless Mesh Networks”. IEEE Society and Technology. Special issue on Potentials and Limits of Cooperation in Wireless Communications. March 2008. P. Antoniadis and B. Le Grand. “Self-organized virtual communities: Bridging the gap between web-based communities and p2p systems”. International Journal of Web-based Communities (IJWBC). To appear. P. Antoniadis, B. Le Grand, and M. Dias de Amorim.“Socially-Motivated Wireless Neighborhood Communities”, International Workshop on Wireless Community Networks, Hangzhou, China, August 2008. 59

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