Ten Surprising Facts about Green IT
Green IT counts Today, IT equipment accounts for around two to four percent of global carbon emissions - similar to the av...
No clue on power However, less than one in three IT departments actually know their power consumption. Fujitsu Siemens Com...
A weighty problem It takes ten times the weight of a PC in chemicals and fossil fuels to make one.   Fujitsu Siemens Compu...
A load of junk As much as one million tons  of electronic equipment becomes obsolete each year. Pioneering IT equipment re...
Staying cool Spending on power and cooling has almost trebled since 1996. Now, a typical IT department spends around 50 ce...
Powering costs By 2009, the price of energy will be the second-highest cost after equip-ment in data center operating cost...
No power needed A single energy-efficient PC with activated power-saving functions can save up to half a ton of CO2 per ye...
Sleep on it 85 percent of the electricity that powers PCs goes to waste as they lie idle.   Through standardized power-sav...
Green pays off Most energy-saving programs in IT will pay for themselves in the long run. A perfect example is the range  ...
Turn it off Almost a third of servers are doing almost nothing except consuming energy. Turning off unused IT equipment su...
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Green IT: 10 Surprising Facts presented by Fujitsu Siemens Computers (FSC)

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Fujitsu Siemens Computers presents 10 surprising facts about Green IT, and some tips on how to save energy.

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Green IT: 10 Surprising Facts presented by Fujitsu Siemens Computers (FSC)

  1. 1. Ten Surprising Facts about Green IT
  2. 2. Green IT counts Today, IT equipment accounts for around two to four percent of global carbon emissions - similar to the aviation industry. With increasing consumption, IT could soon over-take air travel as a polluter. This is why Fujitsu Siemens Computers has been focused on environmental care for the last 20 years . These efforts brought to market the world’s first green PC back in 1993 and have reduced the energy needed to build a PC by 60 percent in the last seven years.
  3. 3. No clue on power However, less than one in three IT departments actually know their power consumption. Fujitsu Siemens Computers is helping companies by offering Green IT consulting services for end-to-end data center optimi-zation, enabling organizations to first understand their power consumption and then reduce it. One example: the cataloguing of energy flows or the analysis of operating risks.
  4. 4. A weighty problem It takes ten times the weight of a PC in chemicals and fossil fuels to make one. Fujitsu Siemens Computers is setting the IT industry’s highest standards with its new Green IT label reflecting the company's entire green lifecycle approach - from environmental conscious development and production, reduced energy consumption and up to 99 percent recyclability at end-of-life.
  5. 5. A load of junk As much as one million tons of electronic equipment becomes obsolete each year. Pioneering IT equipment recy-cling, Fujitsu Siemens Computers opened its own recycling center some 20 years ago. Today these facilities recycle 98 percent of returned computer materials and components, exceeding the legal standards for disposal more than 10 fold.
  6. 6. Staying cool Spending on power and cooling has almost trebled since 1996. Now, a typical IT department spends around 50 cents of every dollar on power and cooling and this keeps on growing… Placing a major focus on the energy efficiency of its products, Fujitsu Siemens Computers was the first vendor to introduce a server capable of handling more than 1,000 operations per Watt, and introduced the world’s most energy-efficient server , drawing 40 percent less power than a standard server.
  7. 7. Powering costs By 2009, the price of energy will be the second-highest cost after equip-ment in data center operating costs. Focusing on Dynamic Infrastruc-tures , Fujitsu Siemens Computers is driving towards reduced data center energy consumption, crea-ting flexible, shared pools of computing resources. Virtualization concepts result in the use of fewer physical systems, saving both operational energy and new manufacturing resources delivering energy savings of more than 70 percent.
  8. 8. No power needed A single energy-efficient PC with activated power-saving functions can save up to half a ton of CO2 per year. Innovative technologies for mana-ging IT equipment power usage have been pioneered by Fujitsu Siemens Computers: With inno-vations such as the Eco-Button reducing notebook system power with power management enabled by default – or the Zero-Watt monitor and PC , which need no power at all in stand-by-mode.
  9. 9. Sleep on it 85 percent of the electricity that powers PCs goes to waste as they lie idle. Through standardized power-saving features as default, pro-ducts waste less power – when in use and when idle. An increa-singly-popular alternative is for example the Virtual Workplace solution from Fujitsu Siemens Computers: Thin clients replace a desktop with a terminal connected to centralized resources – and use 50 percent less power.
  10. 10. Green pays off Most energy-saving programs in IT will pay for themselves in the long run. A perfect example is the range of energy-efficient PRIMERGY industry-standard servers from Fujitsu Siemens Computers. Through reduced power con-sumption, these energy-efficient servers save around € 200 a year in power consumption in compa-rison to regular servers delivering a return on investment in less than two years.
  11. 11. Turn it off Almost a third of servers are doing almost nothing except consuming energy. Turning off unused IT equipment such as servers is also an option. Power control tools for servers and clients from Fujitsu Siemens Computers turn equipment off when not required, and power them up again ready for when they are needed. This can radically reduce power consump-tion – by as much as 75 percent.

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