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8 neuroscience lessons for creating content that journalists want to share

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Want to get your content featured in top tier media every time you hit publish?

Curious about why some content just seems to go viral, and yet most content just falls flat?

In this webinar, Danny Ashton of NeoMam Studios will take you through the knowledge his agency has gained from producing and promoting over 1000 visual content campaigns since 2010.

After the webinar you will understand:

- Why the human brain is wired for certain content ideas and how you can use this to you advantage.
- What brain tricks you can use to get journalists to take notice of your content.
- Where you can test and tweak your content before reaching out to journalists.

Published in: Marketing
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8 neuroscience lessons for creating content that journalists want to share

  1. 1. 8 neuroscience lessons for creating content that journalists want to share Danny Ashton
  2. 2. Can you read the following in 3 seconds?
  3. 3. An unreasonable request…
  4. 4. ... How about this?
  5. 5. Easy, right?
  6. 6. Hello! I’m Danny Ashton
  7. 7. We have spent the past 5 years trying out different things with content
  8. 8. Over the years we got some great wins…
  9. 9. But results were still inconsistent
  10. 10. Recently, strange things started to happen…
  11. 11. After years of trying to convince journalists to feature our work – now they are asking us for visual content.
  12. 12. 8 neuroscience lessons 1. Triune brain theory. 2. Reptilian’s brain attention. 3. Hardwired for emotion. 4. Audience’s emotional response. 5. Limbic-focused content. 6. The Neomammalian brain. 7. 3-second test. 8. Human interaction.
  13. 13. Lesson 1 - The Triune Brain Theory
  14. 14. Lesson 2 - Getting the Reptilian’s brain attention
  15. 15. The issue with the reptilian approach
  16. 16. Brand reputation
  17. 17. Reptilian content aimed at publishers can be done…
  18. 18. So… What’s the problem with creating reptilian content aimed at publishers? • Access: To win a break, you need to provide content that is better than what the publishers are currently creating. • Resources: Tabloids are the major supplier of reptilian content and they have more money and experience. • Budget: With a limited budget, it’s hard to make an impression.
  19. 19. Lesson 3 - How we are all hardwired for emotion
  20. 20. Enter the Limbic System
  21. 21. Lesson 4 - The importance of knowing your audience’s emotional response
  22. 22. Emotions and the parenting audience
  23. 23. Emotions and the gadget audience
  24. 24. But it’s not just positive emotions…
  25. 25. Emotions and the car enthusiast
  26. 26. Lesson 5 - The rise of limbic-focused content
  27. 27. Buzzfeed and Upworthy have been built on this type of content
  28. 28. The “real” publishers are changing.
  29. 29. So where does the Neomammalian Brain fit in?
  30. 30. Lesson 6 – Mind the Gatekeepers’ Neomammalian Brain
  31. 31. Journalists = Gatekeepers
  32. 32. What does this all mean? • Versatility: Our content needs to have a limbic (emotional) focus - but it also needs to pass the neomammalian scrutiny of the gatekeepers. • Credibility: A journalist needs a good, trustworthy source to write a fair and balanced story. Every time that a journalist uses a source, a decision has to be made on credibility.
  33. 33. The science lecture is over
  34. 34. But first, a confession “Creating purely reptilian content is not our goal –but the reptilian brain is something we can’t ignore.”
  35. 35. Lesson 7 - The golden 3-second test
  36. 36. Case Study 1 • Client: Hosting Affiliate • Target Audience: General, Internet users. • Relevancy scale: Relevant to customers and potential customers.
  37. 37. 1. Limbic concerns What is the emotional nature of our audience? Fear/Paranoia — Lack of privacy/control
  38. 38. 2. Digital PR potential assessment Do publishers care?
  39. 39. 3. Ideation & Content brainstorm • Research: Content from social networks and publisher’s audience – related to the emotion/issues we want to target. • Final idea: Based on limbic response of this particular audience to the issues we have identified.
  40. 40. Our idea » How To Disappear Online
  41. 41. 4. Reptilian Concerns • Images will be the primary format – they will pass a 3 second scan. • Title exploits ‘uncertainty’ by promising a simple solution, i.e. ‘How to…’
  42. 42. 5. Neomammalian Concerns
  43. 43. (and a little “social proof” doesn’t hurt)
  44. 44. Results » Media coverage
  45. 45. Results » Placements galore
  46. 46. The real goal » Human interaction
  47. 47. Case Study 2: “The Ultimate Towel Folding Guide” • Target Audience: Pinterest users/Interior design • Emotion/Limbic: Playful content, which works well with this audience • Reptilian: Quick, visual guide to • Neomammalian: The instructions actually work
  48. 48. Reptilian & Limbic concerns
  49. 49. Results » Media coverage & Social shares 413k views · 60+ placements · 2.6K+ social media shares
  50. 50. (but you can’t beat real human interaction!)
  51. 51. Lesson 8 - The power of human interaction
  52. 52. There is a problem with static visual content…
  53. 53. One solution: Interactive experiences
  54. 54. Results » Placements galore
  55. 55. Reactions » Neomammalian brain
  56. 56. Interactivity is not a magic bullet
  57. 57. Summary For creating content that journalists want to share: 1. Identify the emotional hooks of your audience, and create ideas using this research. 2. Fact-check/evaluate/invest/test your content so it will pass the Neomammalian ‘gatekeeper’. 3. Seduce the reptilian brain by matching easy-to-digest content with ‘uncertainty/solution’-powered titles.
  58. 58. Thanks for listening  Continue the conversation and follow me on Twitter: @dannyashton

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