Scope of variables

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Scope of variables

  1. 1. CS111 Lab Scope of Variables Instructor: Michael Gordon
  2. 2. What is Scope?  The “scope” of a variable means the places in your code you can use it.  All of our variables so far have been declared in blocks of code delineated by { } (such as the int main() function or other function, as well as loops and conditionals.  If a variable is declared in a block, it can only be used in that block (and subblocks).
  3. 3. Example for(int i=0;i<=10;i++){ cout<<i; //outputs “i" } cout<<i; //error! This is true even without { } for(int i=0;i<=10;i++) cout<<i; //outputs “i" cout<<i; //error!
  4. 4. Functions A function cannot access a variable declared in the main() method, unless the value of that variable is passed as a parameter.  In the function there will now be a copy of the original value.  Changing the value of the variable in the called function, does not affect its value elsewhere.
  5. 5. Example void func(int x){ x = 10; } int main(){ int n = 5; func(n); cout<<n; //Outputs 5, NOT 10. } Value of “x” is lost once function is completed.
  6. 6. Example 2 int func(int x){ x = 10; return x; } int main(){ int n = 5; n = func(n); cout<<n; //Outputs 10. }
  7. 7. Pass by Reference  In C++ we can give a function access to the original variable itself, by passing a “reference” to it. (The reference being the address of the variable in memory.)  Then any changes done to it in the function remain in effect.
  8. 8. Example void func(int &x){ x = 10; } int main(){ int n = 5; func(n); cout<<n; //Outputs 10. }

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