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Brain & Reading
Nellie Deutsch, Ed.D
Education Technology Practitioner
Paper or Screen?
Paper or Screen?
Population of Study
Taken online courses
Use Digital Screen
Preferences
Multiple Screens & Paper
Learning to Read
Reading not Natural
(Bowden, 1911; Dehaene, 2009)
Brain Changes
(Bracken, 2014 ; Dehaene, 2009)
Brain Changes
(Bracken, 2014 ; Dehaene, 2009)
Communication Skills
Should We Worry?
Focus on Reading 4 Learning
“We learn best with focused attention”
(Goleman, 2013, p. 16)
Challenges and Opportunities
Personal Devices for Reading
“Phase-Locking”
Making Neural Connections
(Davidson, 2012; Goleman, 2013)
Connecting to Previous Learning
Focus Necessary ...
Sensory
Visual
Auditory
Smell
Tactile
Taste
Personal
Inner
Other
Outer
Distractions Challenge Reading
• Relax
• Positive outlook
• Collaborate
• Social Engagement
• Transfer in and out of class
What happens when students foc...
Fun Reading & Learning
Bowden, J. H. (1911). Learning to read. The Elementary School Teacher,
12(1), pp. 21-33.
Bracken, J. K. (2014, December). ...
Dehaene, S. (2009, November 17). Our brain on books.
Retrieved from http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/your-brain-o...
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Paper or Screen Reading?

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Paper of Screen? What do you prefer and what is it doing to your brain? Webinar on MM8 with Nellie Deutsch as she discusses the topic on WizIQ

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Paper or Screen Reading?

  1. 1. Brain & Reading Nellie Deutsch, Ed.D Education Technology Practitioner
  2. 2. Paper or Screen?
  3. 3. Paper or Screen?
  4. 4. Population of Study Taken online courses
  5. 5. Use Digital Screen
  6. 6. Preferences
  7. 7. Multiple Screens & Paper
  8. 8. Learning to Read
  9. 9. Reading not Natural (Bowden, 1911; Dehaene, 2009)
  10. 10. Brain Changes (Bracken, 2014 ; Dehaene, 2009)
  11. 11. Brain Changes (Bracken, 2014 ; Dehaene, 2009)
  12. 12. Communication Skills
  13. 13. Should We Worry?
  14. 14. Focus on Reading 4 Learning “We learn best with focused attention” (Goleman, 2013, p. 16)
  15. 15. Challenges and Opportunities Personal Devices for Reading
  16. 16. “Phase-Locking” Making Neural Connections (Davidson, 2012; Goleman, 2013) Connecting to Previous Learning Focus Necessary for Learning
  17. 17. Sensory Visual Auditory Smell Tactile Taste Personal Inner Other Outer Distractions Challenge Reading
  18. 18. • Relax • Positive outlook • Collaborate • Social Engagement • Transfer in and out of class What happens when students focus? (Csikszentmihalyi, 2002; Davidson, 2012; Goleman, 2013)
  19. 19. Fun Reading & Learning
  20. 20. Bowden, J. H. (1911). Learning to read. The Elementary School Teacher, 12(1), pp. 21-33. Bracken, J. K. (2014, December). Reading screens vs. reading paper: New literacies? Critical Studies. Retrieved from http://ala- choice.libguides.com/c.php?g=407670 Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2002). Flow. London: Rider. Davidson, R., & Begley, S. (2012) The emotional life of your brain: How to change the way you think, feel and live. London: Hodder & Stoughton. References
  21. 21. Dehaene, S. (2009, November 17). Our brain on books. Retrieved from http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/your-brain-on- books/ Dehaene, S. (2009). Reading in the brain: The science and evolution of a human invention. New York: Viking. Goleman, D. (2013). Focus: The hidden driver of excellence. London: Bloomsbury. References

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