Mh Manual Handling

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My own design on the standard theme of Manual Handling Training

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Mh Manual Handling

  1. 1. MANUAL HANDLING A brief introduction to manual handling in the workplace A series of safety training sessions Copyright of Neil Tilley MBIFM Tech IOSH
  2. 2. MANUAL HANDLING A brief introduction to manual handling in the workplace A series of safety training sessions Copyright of Neil Tilley MBIFM Tech IOSH Training should cover: ■ manual handling risk factors and how injuries can occur; ■ how to carry out safe manual handling including good handling technique (see ‘Good handling technique for lifting’ and ‘Good handling technique for pushing and pulling’); ■ appropriate systems of work for the individual’s tasks and environment; ■ use of mechanical aids; ■ practical work to allow the trainer to identify and put right anything the trainee is not doing safely.
  3. 3. The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, as amended in 2002 apply to a wide range of manual handling activities, including lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or carrying. The load may be either inanimate - such as a box or a trolley, or animate - a person or an animal.
  4. 4. The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, as amended in 2002 apply to a wide range of manual handling activities, including lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or carrying. The load may be either inanimate - such as a box or a trolley, or animate - a person or an animal. More than a third of all over-three-day injuries reported each year to HSE and local authorities are caused by manual handling - the transporting or supporting of loads by hand or by bodily force.
  5. 5. The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, as amended in 2002 apply to a wide range of manual handling activities, including lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or carrying. The load may be either inanimate - such as a box or a trolley, or animate - a person or an animal. More than a third of all over-three-day injuries reported each year to HSE and local authorities are caused by manual handling - the transporting or supporting of loads by hand or by bodily force. The most recent survey of self-reported work-related illness estimated that in 2001/02, 1.1 million people in Great Britain suffered from musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) caused or made worse by their current or past work. An estimated 12.3 million working days were lost due to these work-related MSDs. On average each sufferer took about 20 days off in that 12-month period.
  6. 6. What are our duties? The Regulations require employers to: ■ avoid the need for hazardous manual handling, so far as is reasonably practicable; ■ assess the risk of injury from any hazardous manual handling that can’t be avoided; and ■ reduce the risk of injury from hazardous manual handling, so far as is reasonably practicable.
  7. 7. What are our duties? The Regulations require employers to: ■ avoid the need for hazardous manual handling, so far as is reasonably practicable; ■ assess the risk of injury from any hazardous manual handling that can’t be avoided; and ■ reduce the risk of injury from hazardous manual handling, so far as is reasonably practicable. Employees have duties too:. ■ follow appropriate systems of work laid down for their safety; ■ make proper use of equipment provided for their safety; ■ co-operate with their employer on health and safety matters; ■ inform the employer if they identify hazardous handling activities; ■ take care to ensure that their activities do not put others at risk.
  8. 8. MECHANICAL HAZARDS Entrapment Nips Traps Impact Cutting Ejection Copyright Material Written by Neil Tilley MBIFM Tech IOSH HAZARD IDENTIFICATION NON MECHANICAL Chemicals Biological Electrical Ergonomics Heat Noise Dust Fire Vibration Bullying Violence Stress Behaviour Radiation & X ray Temperature Manual Handling Weight or load Lack of training More occurrences of Slips trips & Heart attack happen at work rather Than in the home ! More falls from height Happen in the home rather Than at work!
  9. 15. MANUAL HANDLING
  10. 16. MANUAL HANDLING Herniated Disc Handling while seated
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  14. 20. MANUAL HANDLING Are we saying we mustn’t exceed the guidelines? No. The risk assessment guidelines are not ‘safe limits’ for lifting. But work outside the guidelines is likely to increase the risk of injury, so you should examine it closely for possible improvements. You should remember that you must make the work less demanding if it is reasonably practicable to do so. What is reasonably practicable? Team Lifting, using lifting equipment, automated systems, get someone else to do it!
  15. 21. Frequent lifting and lowering The guideline weights are for infrequent operations - up to about 30 operations per hour - where the pace of work is not forced, adequate pauses to rest or use different muscles are possible, and the load is not supported by the handler for any length of time. Reduce the weights if the operation is repeated more often. As a rough guide, reduce the weights by 30% if the operation is repeated once or twice per minute, by 50% if the operation is repeated five to eight times a minute, and by 80% where the operation is repeated more than 12 times a minute.
  16. 22. MANUAL HANDLING Boxes with handles can be an ergonomic menace!
  17. 23. MANUAL HANDLING Objects with handles can be an ergonomic menace!
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  19. 25. MANUAL HANDLING
  20. 26. <ul><li>Keep the load close to the waist. Keep the load close to the body for as long </li></ul><ul><li>as possible while lifting. Keep the heaviest side of the load next to the body. If a </li></ul><ul><li>close approach to the load is not possible, try to slide it towards the body </li></ul><ul><li>before attempting to lift it. </li></ul><ul><li>■ Adopt a stable position. The feet should be apart with one leg slightly forward </li></ul><ul><li>to maintain balance (alongside the load, if it is on the ground). The worker </li></ul><ul><li>should be prepared to move their feet during the lift to maintain their stability. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid tight clothing or unsuitable footwear, which may make this difficult. </li></ul><ul><li>■  Get a good hold. Where possible the load should be hugged as close as </li></ul><ul><li>possible to the body. This may be better than gripping it tightly with hands only. </li></ul><ul><li>■  Start in a good posture. At the start of the lift, slight bending of the back, hips </li></ul><ul><li>and knees is preferable to fully flexing the back (stooping) or fully flexing the </li></ul><ul><li>hips and knees (squatting). </li></ul><ul><li>■  Don’t flex the back any further while lifting. This can happen if the legs </li></ul><ul><li>begin to straighten before starting to raise the load. </li></ul><ul><li>■ Avoid twisting the back or leaning sideways , especially while the back is </li></ul><ul><li>bent. Shoulders should be kept level and facing in the same direction as the </li></ul><ul><li>hips. Turning by moving the feet is better than twisting and lifting at the same </li></ul><ul><li>time. </li></ul><ul><li>■  Keep the head up when handling. Look ahead, not down at the load, once </li></ul><ul><li>it has been held securely. </li></ul><ul><li>■ Move smoothly. The load should not be jerked or snatched as this can make </li></ul><ul><li>it harder to keep control and can increase the risk of injury. </li></ul><ul><li>■ Don’t lift or handle more than can be easily managed. There is a </li></ul><ul><li>difference between what people can lift and what they can safely lift. If in </li></ul><ul><li>doubt, seek advice or get help. </li></ul><ul><li>■  Put down, then adjust. If precise positioning of the load is necessary, put it </li></ul><ul><li>down first, then slide it into the desired position </li></ul>
  21. 27. MANUAL HANDLING
  22. 28. MANUAL HANDLING On completion of this Element Learners should: ■ follow appropriate systems of work laid down for their safety; ■ make proper use of equipment provided for their safety; ■ co-operate with their employer on health and safety matters; ■ inform the employer if they identify hazardous handling activities; ■ take care to ensure that their activities do not put others at risk. Training today should have covered: ■ manual handling risk factors and how injuries can occur; ■ how to carry out safe manual handling including good handling technique (‘Good handling technique for lifting’ and ‘Good handling technique for pushing and pulling’); ■ appropriate systems of work for the individual’s tasks and environment; ■ use of mechanical aids; ■ practical work to allow the trainer to identify and put right anything the trainee is not doing safely.
  23. 29. Further Information; www.hse.com www.iosh.co.uk www.rospa.co.uk www.bsc.co.uk

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