Working with Parents and Governors Neil Roskilly, CEO
Why Work with Parents and Governors? Badge of Office?
<ul><li>You’ll end up: </li></ul><ul><li>Polarizing opinion </li></ul><ul><li>Creating a dependency culture </li></ul><ul>...
Why Work with Parents and Governors? Simply put …  in good times, you can achieve more, and achieve it more quickly,  and ...
You.... <ul><li>Want the best for the pupils in your school </li></ul><ul><li>Feel happier carrying most with you  </li></...
Self-security <ul><li>“ Self-security will be a hallmark of the leaders and exceptional organizations of the future. Self-...
Stakeholders <ul><li>? </li></ul>
Stakeholder dispositions Involvement Against For
Stakeholder dispositions:  examples Involvement Against For The enemy;  taking every opportunity to undermine your efforts...
Involvement Against For 1 Head 2 Chair of Govs 3 Parents 4 Deputy 5 Admin staff 6 Gov body 7 Proprietor 8 Teaching staff 9...
Involvement Against For +5 -5 0 10 Dep. Head Headteacher Parents Chair of  Govs Gov body SMT Admin 2 Full-time teaching st...
Involvement Against For +5 -5 0 10 Dep. Head Headteacher Parents Chair of  Govs Gov body SMT Admin Full-time teaching staf...
<ul><li>Identify dispositions and effect move BEFORE you try systemic change. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stakeholder mapping us...
<ul><li>Daniel Coleman, “Working with Emotional Intelligence” </li></ul><ul><li>Inspiring and Guiding Individuals and Grou...
<ul><li>Engaging at an emotional level </li></ul><ul><li>Jon Katzenbach  </li></ul><ul><li>“ The power of emotional commit...
<ul><li>Engaging at an emotional level </li></ul><ul><li>“ Firms of Endearment” </li></ul><ul><li>(Sisodia, Wolfe and Shet...
Understand the strength of relationships between stakeholders Involvement Against For +5 -5 0 10 Dep.Head Headteacher Pare...
Dealing with the “for and against” dichotomy Against For +5 -5 0 <ul><li>Coping mechanisms: </li></ul><ul><li>Recognise an...
Stakeholders Parents Teaching staff SLT Pupils Chair of Govs Governors Teaching staff Administration staff Proprietor Depu...
School Governors
Working with stakeholders: governors <ul><li>How far do you agree with the following? </li></ul><ul><li>… many governing b...
Working with stakeholders: governors / proprietor <ul><li>Absolutely key:   </li></ul><ul><li>Clearly define responsibilit...
Working with stakeholders: governors/ proprietor <ul><li>Agree with your Chair of Governors / Proprietor: </li></ul><ul><u...
Working with stakeholders: governors / proprietor General heads of agreement on Roles and Responsibilities – example: “ At...
Using a roles and responsibilities matrix   (include the Bursar if you have one; use to review JDs) Head Govs/ Proprietor ...
Appointing Governors   “ Oh, I’ll ask my new neighbour as we had a barbecue with them last weekend. His wife   is a financ...
Sources of help for working with Governors <ul><li>LA training </li></ul><ul><li>AGBIS – become a member </li></ul><ul><li...
AGBIS <ul><li>“ The Governing Body is responsible for determining the aims and overall conduct of the school. It sets and ...
The regulatory framework (ISI handbook) <ul><li>“ Particular weight is given to the governors’ or proprietor’s oversight o...
An effective Governing Body is one which… <ul><li>Considers its own training needs (training budget) </li></ul><ul><li>Wor...
Working with stakeholders: parents
Recent inspection report – links with parents “outstanding” <ul><li>Parents feel very welcome in the school and are active...
Working with stakeholders: parents <ul><li>Four areas for internal debate:  </li></ul><ul><li>Parents as partners: the cas...
The “psychological moat” <ul><li>Common: parents are invited in on festive occasions for a “show and tell”, but kept quite...
Parents often have negative memories of their own schooling So, you were the one who had your top button undone in the sch...
How do we engage parents?
<ul><li>Common (formal): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Representation on governing body </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PTA (but just f...
Common barriers <ul><li>Absent parents </li></ul><ul><li>The “we pay you to get on with it” syndrome </li></ul><ul><li>Sil...
<ul><li>School leaders’ fears of “parent power”   </li></ul><ul><li>Union’s fears over parent power in private schools </l...
Conclusions - Heads working with Parents and Governors “… WANTED FOR HAZARDOUS JOURNEY.  SMALL WAGES, BITTER COLD, LONG MO...
Conclusions - Heads working with Parents and Governors <ul><li>Morrell and Capparell (2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Cultivate se...
Conclusions – Heads working with Parents and Governors “ If I had not some strength of will  I would make a first class dr...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Neil Roskilly Working With Parents And Governors Revised Mt

1,315 views

Published on

Working with Parents and Governors (and proprietors) in Independent Schools in the UK

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,315
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The stakeholder map has two axes: The X axis represents the spectrum of dispositions toward your change project; from Against at one extreme – to For at the other. The Y axis represents the spectrum of involvement from high at the top to none at the bottom. Note that the Y axis intercepts at the mid-point of the X axis. This represents a position on the X axis equivalent to a neutral disposition – neither for, nor against, the change.
  • This slide illustrates the concept of the stakeholder map. By positioning five very different but stereotypical dispositions towards a change project you can readily see how the stakeholder map works: The location of a stakeholder on the map is determined by rating their relative disposition towards your project and the degree to which they are actively involved in it. Hence, two stakeholders may both be actively involved, but have quite opposing dispositions towards your project: one actively undermining it while the other is actively promoting it!
  • This worked example illustrates some typical stakeholder disposition towards a school change initiative. Ideally you would want everyone to be at the top right-hand corner – actively involved and championing your project! But this example shows a broad landscape of diverging dispositions that is more typical. Note that in addition to the disposition of each stakeholder we have added one further dimension: the degree to which each stakeholder can influence the change is reflected in the size of the circle used to denote that stakeholder. This dimension reflects one aspect of the underlying political situation. This is important to the success of change. Clearly you would want the most influential stakeholders on the right of your map and hopefully migrating to the top!
  • This worked example illustrates some typical stakeholder disposition towards a school change initiative. Ideally you would want everyone to be at the top right-hand corner – actively involved and championing your project! But this example shows a broad landscape of diverging dispositions that is more typical. Note that in addition to the disposition of each stakeholder we have added one further dimension: the degree to which each stakeholder can influence the change is reflected in the size of the circle used to denote that stakeholder. This dimension reflects one aspect of the underlying political situation. This is important to the success of change. Clearly you would want the most influential stakeholders on the right of your map and hopefully migrating to the top!
  • The last step in the mapping exercise is to add a final dimension: this is the relationships that exist between stakeholders. Draw lines that connect two stakeholders in your map where a relationship currently exists. The thickness of the line can indicate your rating of the relative strength of that relationship – the closer the relationship, the thicker the line. This represents another aspect of the underlying political situation and is helpful to know. Note that relationship can be negative as well as positive! The assumption in this slide is that all relationships are positive ones. If you think it is relevant, you might want to illustrate a negative relationship by a broken line. In the effort to shift dispositions to a more favourable situation you might want to exploit the relationship that exists, say, between a strong supporter of your project and someone else who remains sceptical or even cynical.
  • The last step in the mapping exercise is to add a final dimension: this is the relationships that exist between stakeholders. Draw lines that connect two stakeholders in your map where a relationship currently exists. The thickness of the line can indicate your rating of the relative strength of that relationship – the closer the relationship, the thicker the line. This represents another aspect of the underlying political situation and is helpful to know. Note that relationship can be negative as well as positive! The assumption in this slide is that all relationships are positive ones. If you think it is relevant, you might want to illustrate a negative relationship by a broken line. In the effort to shift dispositions to a more favourable situation you might want to exploit the relationship that exists, say, between a strong supporter of your project and someone else who remains sceptical or even cynical.
  • Give delegates time to add labels to a large copy of this diagram.
  • Neil Roskilly Working With Parents And Governors Revised Mt

    1. 1. Working with Parents and Governors Neil Roskilly, CEO
    2. 2. Why Work with Parents and Governors? Badge of Office?
    3. 3. <ul><li>You’ll end up: </li></ul><ul><li>Polarizing opinion </li></ul><ul><li>Creating a dependency culture </li></ul><ul><li>Fixing the guttering </li></ul>&quot;The key to successful leadership today is influence, not authority.&quot; Ken Blanchard
    4. 4. Why Work with Parents and Governors? Simply put … in good times, you can achieve more, and achieve it more quickly, and more easily, when working with and through stakeholders … when times are more difficult, you have others who can shoulder the burden, be on your side and more readily forgive your limitations “ ensuring process support” (Katzenbach and Smith) … the work of a lifetime can be dismantled in an instant
    5. 5. You.... <ul><li>Want the best for the pupils in your school </li></ul><ul><li>Feel happier carrying most with you </li></ul><ul><li>(conflict avoidance) </li></ul><ul><li>May want to effect change </li></ul><ul><li>Want to exercise your moral purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Feel the weight of responsibility - accountable to stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Strive for self-security </li></ul>
    6. 6. Self-security <ul><li>“ Self-security will be a hallmark of the leaders and exceptional organizations of the future. Self-security in an individual or a system brings a high ratio of coherence. Leaders or organizations with self-security can push power and authority downstream and develop centers of innovation and excellence at all levels of the organization”. </li></ul><ul><li>Doc Childre and Bruce Cryer, “From Chaos to Coherence ” </li></ul>
    7. 7. Stakeholders <ul><li>? </li></ul>
    8. 8. Stakeholder dispositions Involvement Against For
    9. 9. Stakeholder dispositions: examples Involvement Against For The enemy; taking every opportunity to undermine your efforts Change champion; takes personal responsibility for ensuring success Fence sitter; not engaged; waiting to see how it goes The cynic; fires cheap shots to test your resolve Willing helper; anxious to lend a hand
    10. 10. Involvement Against For 1 Head 2 Chair of Govs 3 Parents 4 Deputy 5 Admin staff 6 Gov body 7 Proprietor 8 Teaching staff 9 SMT 10 LA
    11. 11. Involvement Against For +5 -5 0 10 Dep. Head Headteacher Parents Chair of Govs Gov body SMT Admin 2 Full-time teaching staff LA Key: Size of circle = degree of influence Proprietor
    12. 12. Involvement Against For +5 -5 0 10 Dep. Head Headteacher Parents Chair of Govs Gov body SMT Admin Full-time teaching staff LA The Challenge – move everyone towards the top right corner Proprietor
    13. 13. <ul><li>Identify dispositions and effect move BEFORE you try systemic change. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stakeholder mapping useful SMT inset </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure you have common set of values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify closely who you INFORM, CONSULT, ACTIVELY INVOLVE </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Define the inclusivity of your leadership </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Daniel Coleman, “Working with Emotional Intelligence” </li></ul><ul><li>Inspiring and Guiding Individuals and Groups is a competence. People with this competence: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Articulate and arouse enthusiasm for a shared vision and mission; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Step forward to lead as needed, regardless of position; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guide the performance of others while holding them accountable; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lead by example. </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Engaging at an emotional level </li></ul><ul><li>Jon Katzenbach </li></ul><ul><li>“ The power of emotional commitment” </li></ul><ul><li>John P Kotter </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Heart of Change” </li></ul><ul><li>Jim Collins </li></ul><ul><li>“ First who…then what” </li></ul><ul><li>Max DePree </li></ul><ul><li>“ Leadership is much more an art, a belief, a condition of the heart, than a set of things to do” </li></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>Engaging at an emotional level </li></ul><ul><li>“ Firms of Endearment” </li></ul><ul><li>(Sisodia, Wolfe and Sheth) </li></ul><ul><li>Firms of endearment (FoEs) endear themselves with stakeholders… create emotional value, experiential value, social value and emotional value </li></ul><ul><li>“ Customers want to be in love, and if they don’t find it, they’ll settle for price and convenience” </li></ul>
    17. 17. Understand the strength of relationships between stakeholders Involvement Against For +5 -5 0 10 Dep.Head Headteacher Parents Chair of Govs Gov body SMT Admin 2 Teaching staff Key: Thickness of line = strength of relationship Bursar (Clerk to Govs?)
    18. 18. Dealing with the “for and against” dichotomy Against For +5 -5 0 <ul><li>Coping mechanisms: </li></ul><ul><li>Recognise and accept it exists </li></ul><ul><li>Define your attitude to it: assume positive intent </li></ul><ul><li>Do not lose sight of the context and strategic </li></ul>
    19. 19. Stakeholders Parents Teaching staff SLT Pupils Chair of Govs Governors Teaching staff Administration staff Proprietor Deputy Head Local Authority School group Other services: police, careers, etc. Alumni
    20. 20. School Governors
    21. 21. Working with stakeholders: governors <ul><li>How far do you agree with the following? </li></ul><ul><li>… many governing bodies exhibit structural weaknesses - of size (too large, or too small, for efficient functioning), of organisation (no committees, or too many), or of composition (too many ex officio figures, or former pupils, or even, sometimes, parents). There are problems of competence - too few governors seek, or receive, training in their responsibilities and functions; some are too busy, but many are not busy enough, in their attendance at school activities. And it is a fact, of course, that however often a governing body meets (most convene formally once a term), and however thoughtfully they arrange their business (most will have two or more specialist sub-committees), the activity of a modern school is too large and complex to be fully appreciated, let alone effectively controlled, by what is, in the end, a body of well-intentioned amateurs. </li></ul><ul><li>Michael St John Parker </li></ul>
    22. 22. Working with stakeholders: governors / proprietor <ul><li>Absolutely key: </li></ul><ul><li>Clearly define responsibilities between Governors and Head </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure governance structure is fit for purpose (school’s core activities, right expertise according to strategic aims, reflects composition of school - ethnic and gender) </li></ul>
    23. 23. Working with stakeholders: governors/ proprietor <ul><li>Agree with your Chair of Governors / Proprietor: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>General heads of agreement on Roles and Responsibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More detailed Matrix of Responsibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Responsibilities for policies: H+S, child protection, statement of school’s ethos and aims, admissions, discipline, exclusions, anti-bullying, finances, etc. </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Working with stakeholders: governors / proprietor General heads of agreement on Roles and Responsibilities – example: “ At X school, the Governors provide challenge and support for the Head, working closely to define, agree and achieve the strategic aims of the school. The governors delegate the daily management and leadership of the school to the Head”
    25. 25. Using a roles and responsibilities matrix (include the Bursar if you have one; use to review JDs) Head Govs/ Proprietor (Bursar) Annual budget R DR Staff appointments R (<SLT) R (>SLT) R (non-teaching) Curriculum R Child protection DR R H+S R DR
    26. 26. Appointing Governors “ Oh, I’ll ask my new neighbour as we had a barbecue with them last weekend. His wife is a financial wizz-kid in some city firm but she’s never around but I’m sure that he will be able to come to the finance committee. Seems a good chap.” An alternative: Gap analysis “ What expertise do we need to achieve our strategic aims over the next five years?” Then advertise
    27. 27. Sources of help for working with Governors <ul><li>LA training </li></ul><ul><li>AGBIS – become a member </li></ul><ul><li>Governing documents: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Trust deed; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Memorandum and Articles; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standing orders, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Charities Commission: “The Essential Trustee” </li></ul><ul><li>If proprietorial: Council of Advisors? </li></ul>
    28. 28. AGBIS <ul><li>“ The Governing Body is responsible for determining the aims and overall conduct of the school. It sets and reviews the policies, plans and procedures that will ensure the best possible education for present and future pupils of the school, including the proper control of its finances” </li></ul><ul><li>“… is accountable for the discharge of its responsibilities to pupils, parents and staff” </li></ul>
    29. 29. The regulatory framework (ISI handbook) <ul><li>“ Particular weight is given to the governors’ or proprietor’s oversight of child protection , recruitment and to matters of health and safety . </li></ul><ul><li>“ Proprietorial schools are judged by the same standards for effective oversight and duty of care, but the details need to be clear so that there is no confusion about the role of proprietors and senior managers , particularly if the same people exercise both functions” </li></ul>
    30. 30. An effective Governing Body is one which… <ul><li>Considers its own training needs (training budget) </li></ul><ul><li>Works as a team </li></ul><ul><li>Knows and visits the school </li></ul><ul><li>Recognises the importance of good relationships with Head </li></ul><ul><li>Exercises effective time management and delegation </li></ul><ul><li>Effective meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Ensures the school’s strategic aims are reached </li></ul>
    31. 31. Working with stakeholders: parents
    32. 32. Recent inspection report – links with parents “outstanding” <ul><li>Parents feel very welcome in the school and are actively involved, both in supporting a variety of activities and in the work and progress of their children, including open days, assemblies , concerts , matches and social events . The parents’ association, Polwhele House Society , is a strength of the school. A network of class representatives welcomes new families to the school, and provides contact and communication between school and parents. Committee members very successfully organise school events raising money for charity and for items for the school. Their activities have included a cheese and wine evening, Christmas bazaar, Easter egg hunt and family fun day. </li></ul><ul><li>Parents receive summaries every three weeks detailing their children’s achievements . Staff report on the progress of individual pupils in a clear, informative way twice each year with details of academic achievement and personal development. </li></ul><ul><li>Polwhele House – Head: Alex McCullough, ISI Inspection Sept/Oct 2009 </li></ul>
    33. 33. Working with stakeholders: parents <ul><li>Four areas for internal debate: </li></ul><ul><li>Parents as partners: the case for greater parental involvement? </li></ul><ul><li>Role of formal instruments such as PTA, Parent Councils? </li></ul><ul><li>Parent satisfaction: would monitoring parental satisfaction raise standards? </li></ul><ul><li>Parent champions: how parents can otherwise support school improvement? </li></ul>
    34. 34. The “psychological moat” <ul><li>Common: parents are invited in on festive occasions for a “show and tell”, but kept quite separate from the ongoing life of the school. </li></ul><ul><li>If so: parents who feel cut off are prepared to believe the worst and accept aberrations as the norm. </li></ul><ul><li>The need to invite parents as school partners “… is a fundamental role for all school leaders,” especially Heads (Stoll and Fink) </li></ul>
    35. 35. Parents often have negative memories of their own schooling So, you were the one who had your top button undone in the school photograph.
    36. 36. How do we engage parents?
    37. 37. <ul><li>Common (formal): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Representation on governing body </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PTA (but just fund-raising?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Newsletters </li></ul></ul><ul><li>More effective (at the learning level): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate effectively on child’s progress, curriculum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helping parents create right environment for learning at home </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Volunteering - recruiting and supporting parental involvement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decision-making - genuine parental involvement - parents’ council, focus groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Survey parental opinion </li></ul></ul>
    38. 38. Common barriers <ul><li>Absent parents </li></ul><ul><li>The “we pay you to get on with it” syndrome </li></ul><ul><li>Silk purses… </li></ul><ul><li>Parents’ historical curriculum and examinations legacy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(David Perkins: “the Trivial Pursuit Theory”) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>School’s cultural fear of parents: </li></ul><ul><li>“ There are some teachers who seem to believe that the parents “are sending the wrong children”. As a friend has said, “parents are sending the best children they have!” (Stoll and Fink) </li></ul>
    39. 39. <ul><li>School leaders’ fears of “parent power” </li></ul><ul><li>Union’s fears over parent power in private schools </li></ul><ul><li>PARENTS are pressurising schools to sack teachers over disputes regarding their children, it emerged yesterday. A conference heard that headteachers at fee-paying schools across the UK are “very sensitive” to complaints from parents who often pay fees of £20,000 per year. </li></ul><ul><li>John Richardson, national officer for independent schools at the Association of Teachers and Lecturers told the union’s annual conference in Torquay: </li></ul><ul><li>“ There is a certain amount of pressure which comes from parents who have very high expectations for exam results from parents paying annual fees of £20,000 …” he said. </li></ul><ul><li>In one case, a teacher was called into the head’s office because parents had complained that their child had only scored 90% in an exam when they were expecting 95% </li></ul>
    40. 40. Conclusions - Heads working with Parents and Governors “… WANTED FOR HAZARDOUS JOURNEY. SMALL WAGES, BITTER COLD, LONG MONTHS OF COMPLETE DARKNESS, CONSTANT DANGER, SAFE RETURN DOUBTFUL. HONOR AND RECOGNITION IN CASE OF SUCCESS.&quot;
    41. 41. Conclusions - Heads working with Parents and Governors <ul><li>Morrell and Capparell (2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Cultivate sense of compassion and responsibility for others </li></ul><ul><li>Once you commit, stick though the tough learning period </li></ul><ul><li>Do your part to create upbeat environment at work - essential for creativity </li></ul><ul><li>Broaden your social and cultural horizons, learning to see things from different perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>In rapidly changing world, be willing to venture in new directions to seize new opportunities and learn new skills </li></ul><ul><li>Find a way to turn setbacks and failures to your own advantage </li></ul><ul><li>Be bold in vision and careful in planning </li></ul><ul><li>Learn from past mistakes </li></ul><ul><li>Never insist on reaching a goal at any cost </li></ul><ul><li>Learn to live with ambiguity </li></ul>
    42. 42. Conclusions – Heads working with Parents and Governors “ If I had not some strength of will I would make a first class drunkard”. Ernest Shackleton Cheers Neil Roskilly, CEO

    ×