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Future Of Digital Marketing

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Future Of Digital Marketing

  1. 1. FUTURE OF DIGITAL MARKETING 2013 http://www.flickr.com/photos/83346641@N00/3562071888/ www.onlydeadfish.co.uk @neilperkin AGILE MARKETING, ADAPTIVE CULTURE http://www.flickr.com/photos/16863501@N00/207844624/
  2. 2. FASHIONISTAS DIGIRATI BEGINNERS CONSERVATIVES Digirati: 26% more profitable, 12% higher market cap, 9% more revenue from existing assets Fashionistas: focus on technological innovation without underlying strategies, processes and team structures to exploit it effectively - actually damages business performance http://www.capgemini-consulting.com/the-digital-advantage/ CAP Gemini/MIT longterm study of 400 companies
  3. 3. http://www.economist.com/news/21567361-google-apple-facebook-and-amazon-are-each-others-throats-all-sorts-ways-another-game GAFA
  4. 4. http://www.flickr.com/photos/darwinbell/ GAFA & The Vertical Stack Hardware Context (location, social, identity, advertising, recommendation) Messaging Operating System Content (Platforms, Streaming, Cloud) Access (apps & browsers) Payment ecosystems
  5. 5. Hardware Messaging Operating System Content (Platforms, Streaming, Cloud) Access (apps & browsers) Payment ecosystems Facetime, Hangouts, Chat, FB Messenger, Skype integration Context (location, social, identity, advertising, recommendation) Location, Social graph, identity, personalisation & recommendation, advertising Checkout, Wallet, iTunes, NFC, Amazon payments, Facebook Credits Chrome, Silk, Safari, Facebook, Apple Android app ecosystems AWS, iTunes & iCloud, Facebook content streaming, storage, Google TV, YouTube, Music Apple IoS, Android, Facebook as social OS Chromebook, Motorola, Apple devices, Kindle
  6. 6. Hardware Messaging Operating System Content (Platforms, Streaming, Cloud) Access (apps & browsers) Payment ecosystems Facetime, Hangouts, Chat, FB Messenger, Skype integration Context (location, social, identity, advertising, recommendation) Location, Social graph, identity, personalisation & recommendation, advertising Checkout, Wallet, iTunes, NFC, Amazon payments, Facebook Credits Chrome, Silk, Safari, Facebook, Apple Android app ecosystems AWS, iTunes & iCloud, Facebook content streaming, storage, Google TV, YouTube, Music Apple IoS, Android, Facebook as social OS Chromebook, Motorola, Apple devices, Kindle Enhance through context Users at the centre Deliver value through access Enhance through context
  7. 7. Ecosystems powered by data and context “The objective is to index not just the web but the users…Google Plus (is) not a social network but a unified Google identity to tie all of your search and indeed internet use together” Benedict Evans http://ben-evans.com/benedictevans/2013/5/21/google-io
  8. 8. Distributed and Destination thinking You have to be on our property for us to monetise We can monetise anywhere
  9. 9. “Users don’t ask for APIs. They want technology that works and integrates well with other technologies. As the number (of APIs) grows, so do the opportunities to provide users with those great, workable solutions.” http://blog.programmableweb.com/2013/04/30/9000-apis-mobile-gets-serious/ Joining stuff up, seamless customer experience
  10. 10. “We needed a bigger boat” Harper Reed "We aggressively stood on the shoulders of giants like Amazon, and used technology that was built by other people. We had a pretty good culture of using not-invented-here technologies. And we weren't scared about it." • “Politicians don’t hire engineers”. Obama did. • API enabled them to rapidly execute, ship over 200 products • Services architecture – apps connected together, sharing one common data store
  11. 11. “We needed a bigger boat” Harper Reed Advantage from agility and talent: “The platform can only offer a competitive advantage for a relatively short period of time without the right people to develop it” • Numbers are everything: "Groundhog Day is a movie about multivariate testing” • Micro-listening as well as micro-targeting: using the power of conversation within small groups
  12. 12. “The Strategy Is Delivery” Mike Bracken “Government should only do what only government can do. If someone else is doing it — link to it. If we can provide resources (like APIs) that will help other people build things — do that. We should concentrate on the irreducible core.”
  13. 13. • Policy as the starting point = overly detailed input • Digital versions of existing practices • Lengthy and complex procurement • Inflexible solutions • Driven by user need • Alpha of the service in 12 weeks • Rapid reaction to user feedback from multiple sources • First 10 days after release over 100 changes at negligible cost. • In many cases, delivery of services has come before final strategy work is completed "In an analogue world policy dictates to delivery, but in a digital world delivery informs policy".
  14. 14. Concept Detailed Design Detailed Design Build Build Detailed Design Detailed Design Build Build SPRINT REVIEW SPRINT REVIEW SPRINT REVIEW SPRINT REVIEW http://www.slideshare.net/razorfishmarketing/razorfish-ray-velez-and-laura-fraga-ford-motor-on-agile-processes?from=ss_embed Ford Motor/Razorfish agile principles Not just the process…but the philosophy Individuals and interactions > processes and tools Working software > comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration > contract negotiation Responding to change > following a plan Design with vision, optimise with feedback
  15. 15. “The notion of ideas as this singular thing is a fundamental flaw. There are so many ideas that what you need is that group behaving creatively. And the person with the vision I think is unique, there are very few people who have that vision.. but if they are not drawing the best out of people then they will fail.” Ed Catmull, President of Pixar Creative process involving a large number of people Often from different disciplines Marshalled around a vision Creative Culture…
  16. 16. • Resourcing for projects is purely voluntary • Project leaders pitch developers to generate interest • Engineers decide which projects sound interesting to work on Engineering Culture…
  17. 17. • A way of remaining agile as the company scales • Large number of small, multidisciplinary teams, 8-10 people • Each responsible for a focused area of service • Customer-centric, focused improvement, speed of innovation Amazon: Two Pizza Teams
  18. 18. Growth Hacking Process for acquiring and retaining users that combines traditional marketing and analytical skills with those more akin to product development
  19. 19. 70% of the content should be low risk, bread and butter marketing 20% should innovate off what works 10% should be high risk ideas that will be tomorrow's 70% or 20%
  20. 20. http://pwcinnovate.wordpress.com/2010/08/05/innovation-horizons/ http://timkastelle.org/blog/2010/08/innovation-for-now-and-for-the-future/ The 3 Horizons: innovation as a portfolio 1. Innovations that improve your current operations 2. Extend your current competencies into new, related markets 3. Ones that will change the nature of your industry
  21. 21. Budget split Life stage Objective KPIs Team 70% Core/oldest products Small growth Maintain profit ‘Rowing team’ 20% Young/mid Increase share and profit Profitable growth ‘White water rafters’ 10% New Prove leap of faith Solving user problems ‘Diving for sunken treasure’ http://www.slideshare.net/martinbailie/sxsw-2013-themes-startup-culture-code-and-data 70%... because video didn't kill the radio star 20%... expeditious feedback, test and learn - optimisation and amplification embedded 10%... space for continuous experimentation a necessity Are you diving for pearls? A 30 year old startup: a company of entrepreneurs making new things through constant iteration
  22. 22. Thank you! www.onlydeadfish.co.uk @neilperkin

Editor's Notes

  • At the beginning of the year, Cap Gemini and MIT released the results of a longterm study of c.400 companies into digital maturityThey mapped digital maturity on two scales - digital intensity is investment in technology-enabled initiatives to change how the company operatesTransformation management intensity was about the leadership capabilities necessary to drive digital transformationThey found that not only were the so-called Digirati 26% more profitable than average, fashionistas, who pursued technology without the foundation of good strategy, processes and structures actually damaged their business and were 11% less profitable
  • So I’m going to talk about the importance of culture, philosophy and strategy as well as technologyLet’s start with GAFA – four companies that could not be more important to digital marketers right now - Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon
  • Technologists talk about technology stacks. My friends at Addictive Mobile talk about the Vertical Stack. Here’s my version of what that looks like – 7 layers at which GAFA are building out a presence and increasingly clashing
  • Each developing an ecosystem that have users at the centre, that deliver value through access, that enhance through the application of context
  • These are ecosystems powered by data and context. Google search plus your world takes what Google knows about the connections between people on the web to enhance the search experience. Google+ is thus not a social network but a unified Google identity, and social layer over other Google services
  • These co’s are also great at what I call distributed and destination thinkingTraditional Destination thinking – you have to be on our property for us to monetiseNewer Distributed thinking – we can monetise anywhere because we weave ourselves into the fabric of the webOne is not better than the other, but GAFA are great at doing both
  • Whatdoes distributed and destination look like for brands? Perhaps something like this…ASOS marketplace. Rather than be worried about cannibalisation, it’s a great piece of destination thinking…and distributed thinking
  • So a key challenge for brands is joining stuff up and providing seamless customer experiences. A key tool in being able to take value from one place and use to enhance the experience in another is the API. Small wonder then that we’re witnessing explosive growth in APIs that might be used inside businesses as well as externally
  • But APIs are a key tool for marketing agility. This is Harper Reed, ex-CTO of Threadless and the CTO of the Obama campaign. I saw a great talk from him at Next Berlin a couple of months ago. The Obama campaign invested heavily in tech talent – in 2008 they had 4 engineers, in 2012 they had 40. He talked about how an API had enabled them to act quickly and at scale, rapidly executing and shipping over 200 products in a short space of time, and how they were not afraid to use technology built by other people
  • He also talked about how metrics drove execution: "Groundhog Day is a movie about multivariate testing”And the idea of using the power of conversation within small groups. 600,000 people using one of their apps on Facebook to encourage their friends to get out and vote.When asked about whether the technologies they built should be open-sourced and made available to others (including the Republicans) to use, he made the point that the platform can only offer a competitive advantage for a relatively short period of time without the right people to develop it, which says a lot for the idea of advantage coming from agility, talent and approaches rather than secrecy and perfection.
  • Meanwhile back in the UK, the Govt Digital Service are bringing a new found level of agility to what has to be the least agile, most rigid and complex environment.Founded around some core design principles that could be the basis for a sound digital philosophy for any business.Start with user needs not govt needsGovernment should only do what only government can do. If someone else is doing it — link to it. If we can provide resources (like APIs) that will help other people build things — do that. We should concentrate on the irreducible corelearn from real world behaviour - build and development process — prototyping and testing with real users on the live webMaking something simple to use is much harder — especially when the underlying systems are complex — but that’s what we should be doing.We’re not designing for a screen, we’re designing for peopleOur service doesn’t begin and end at our website. It might start with a search engine and end at the post office. We need to design for thatConsistency of language, design patterns, underlying approachWe should share what we’re doing whenever we can.
  • Mike talks about how the old process that put policy as the starting point leads to overly detailed input, 'digital versions' of existing practices, lengthy and complex procurement proceedures and inflexible solutions based on analgue thinking:The new process shows the transformative effect of an approach driven from the very beginning by user need. For GOV.UK they created an alpha of the service in 12 weeks based on evident user needs, and designed or re-designed services through rapidly reacting to user feedback from multiple sources (user surveys, A/B testing, summative tests, social media), precluding lengthy procurement proceedures and shrinking the time between feedback and resultant changes to live services.
  • So what GDS is doing really well is applying not just the process of agile development but the philosophy that surrounds it
  • So the most interesting places in our industry right now are at the extremes of creativity and science
  • Two pizza teams…
  • What might a two pizza team look like in comms?
  • Te other role that is really interesting is the Growth hacker – spanning traditional marketing and product development. Using metrics from bothAre digital marketers the new growth hackers?
  • So the principles of agile and test and learn are applicable not just to startups but to every company
  • We need to embed innovation into digital marketing70,20,10 model is a really interesting one - applicable to resourcing (Google), L & D, Content Strategy (Coca Cola), and should be for budgeting
  • And innovation - The three horizons model enables a portfolio approach to innovation, mixing incremental with radical. Horizon 1…Incremental, extending and defending core businessesbuilding new businessesseeding options for the future
  • 70, 20, 10 is a model with broad application since new things rarely kill old things, we need to embed dgitally native practices like optimisation and amplification into our businesses, but also leave room for continuous innovationLook at Intuit – 30 year old startup, a company of entrepreneursTie objectives, KPIs, resourcing back to 70,20,10 – so my question to you is: Are you diving for pearls?
  • Thank you
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