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Using jobs-to-be-done to design better user experiences (UX Cambridge 2017)

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"People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole." (Theodore Levitt, Harvard marketing professor). Jobs-to-be-done is one of those concepts that intuitively makes so much sense, and yet still isn’t that widely known or used. The idea that you should focus on the job that someone is trying to do, rather than just the means of achieving , is not a revolutionary one, but is nonetheless incredibly powerful and insightful. As Clay Christensen, one of the fellow architects of jobs-to-be-done, has said, "In hindsight the job to be done is usually as obvious as the air we breathe. Once they are known, what to improve (and not to improve) is just as obvious".

This interactive and hands-on workshop, from UX Cambridge 2017 covers how to use jobs-to-be-done to not only come up with innovative ideas, but to research and design better user experiences, regardless of whether someone is starting from a blank sheet, or improving an existing product or service.

It includes how to identify jobs-to-be-done, how to use job stories to help frame jobs-to-be-done and how to enhance personas, user journey maps and even user stories using jobs-to-be-done.

Published in: Design
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Using jobs-to-be-done to design better user experiences (UX Cambridge 2017)

  1. 1. Neil Turner www.uxforthemasses.com @neilturnerux Using jobs-to-be-done to design better user experiences
  2. 2. UX lead at AstraZeneca
  3. 3. 3 quite interesting things about me…
  4. 4. 1. Identical twin ME!
  5. 5. 2. Pupil at Nelson’s school
  6. 6. 3. Norwich City fan
  7. 7. • What are jobs-to-be-done? • Why are they so important? • How to identify them • How to prioritise them • How to capture and map them • How best to utilise them • Where to find out more WHAT WILL WE COVER?
  8. 8. How many products and services do you use?
  9. 9. “We hire products to do things for us” Clayton Christensen Harvard Business School Professor & Disruptive Innovation Expert
  10. 10. “People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole.” Theodore Levitt Economist and Harvard Business School Professor
  11. 11. “A job-to-be-done is not a product, service, or a specific solution; it's the higher purpose for which customers buy products, services, and solutions.” The Innovator’s Toolkit David Silverstein, Dr. Phil Samuel, Neil DeCarlo
  12. 12. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfGtw2C95Ms
  13. 13. JOBS-TO-BE-DONE • Are relatively universal • Don’t substantially change over time • Are solution agnostic
  14. 14. Job = Listen to music
  15. 15. Job = Avoid awkward silences with background music
  16. 16. Job = Distract from the pain
  17. 17. Job = Listen to the latest bangers
  18. 18. Job = Discover hidden gems
  19. 19. Job = Avoid boredom
  20. 20. “Jobs-to-be-done helps you to focus on what really matters, rather than trying to add on cool features that muddle the customer experience and make the product less compelling.” Jobs to be Done: A Roadmap for Customer-Centered Innovation David Farber, Jessica Wattman, and Stephen Wunker
  21. 21. “If you understand the job, how to improve it becomes obvious” Clayton Christensen Harvard Business School Professor & Disruptive Innovation Expert
  22. 22. Audio books on Spotify?
  23. 23. Identifying jobs-to-be done
  24. 24. MAIN JOB RELATED JOBS Relieve boredom Choose music Listen to music
  25. 25. Interviewing users Observing users
  26. 26. • What jobs do people struggle with? • Where are products and services not being used? • What work-arounds do you see? • What jobs do people want to avoid? • What surprising uses have people found for existing products and services? IDENTIFYING JOBS-TO-BE-DONE
  27. 27. JOB STORIES Situation Need Goal When… I want to… So… Travelling in the car Keep myself and passengers entertained No one gets bored
  28. 28. • Uncover jobs-to-be-done • Focus on poorly satisfied jobs • Structure as job stories • Switch between interviewer & interviewee CARRY OUT A JOBS-TO-BE-DONE INTERVIEW
  29. 29. Prioritising jobs-to-be done
  30. 30. So many jobs-to-do to choose from…
  31. 31. High importance Low satisfaction = High opportunity Satisfactionwithcurrentsolution Importance of job High importance High satisfaction = Potential for disruption Low importance High satisfaction = Very limited opportunity Low importance Low satisfaction = Limited opportunity Prioritising jobs-to-be-done
  32. 32. High importance Low satisfaction = High opportunity Satisfactionwithcurrentsolution Importance of job High importance High satisfaction = Potential for disruption Low importance High satisfaction = Very limited opportunity Low importance Low satisfaction = Limited opportunity
  33. 33. • Prioritise jobs-to-be-done from the user interview • Think about importance vs satisfaction PRIORITISE JOBS-TO-BE-DONE
  34. 34. Mapping jobs-to-be done
  35. 35. JOB STORIES Situation Need Goal When… I want to… So… Travelling in the car Keep myself and passengers entertained No one gets bored
  36. 36. CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MAP
  37. 37. JOB-TO-BE-DONE MAP CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MAP Captures what the customer is trying to get done (i.e. the jobs) independent of the solution Captures what the customer does and their experience using products & services along the way
  38. 38. 1. Define 2. Locate 3. Prepare 4. Confirm 5. Execute 6. Monitor 7. Modify 8. Conclude JOB STEPS Source: Customer-Centered Innovation Map By Ulwick and Bettencourt Harvard Business Review
  39. 39. SIMPLIFIED JOB STEPS 1. Plan 2. Prepare 3. Execute 4. Monitor 5. Conclude
  40. 40. FOR A JOB-TO-BE-DONE • Jobs for each step • Success criteria • Functional, Emotional, Social • Possible solutions • Pain points • Opportunities
  41. 41. Jobs Related jobs-to-be-done to achieve the main job
  42. 42. SUCCESS CRITERIA • Functional criteria • Emotional criteria • Social criteria
  43. 43. Functional criteria Practical & objective criteria for possible solutions
  44. 44. Emotional criteria  Subjective criteria related to feelings & emotions
  45. 45. Social criteria   How the customer believes he or she will be perceived by others while using a possible solution
  46. 46. Possible solutions Solutions for consideration against criteria
  47. 47. Pain Points  Frustrations and pain points for current solutions
  48. 48. Opportunities Opportunities to better complete the job-to-be-done
  49. 49. An example job-to-be-done map
  50. 50. Utilising jobs-to-be done
  51. 51. 6 STEPS TO UTILISING JTBD 1. Identify jobs-to-be-done 2. Prioritise to identify best opportunities 3. Observe how people solve the problem & interview to identify success criteria 4. Map and identify related jobs 5. Identify opportunities e.g. new solutions 6. Devise experiments to test opportunities
  52. 52. JOB STORIES Situation Need Goal When… I want to… So… Travelling in the car Keep myself and passengers entertained On one gets bored
  53. 53. “Personas are a collection of attributes. They don’t explain causality” Clayton Christensen Harvard Business School Professor & Disruptive Innovation Expert
  54. 54. Jeff Gothelf Author of Lean UX and Sense & Respond “Jobs To Be Done is a valuable exercise for product and service teams. Persona creation and validation is equally as valuable. Together, they make for a combined activity that paints a clear picture of who is using our product and what they’re trying to achieve. There’s no reason for them to be in conflict.”
  55. 55. JTBD Personas Context Rationale Motivations Empathy
  56. 56. Adding to personas Jobs to be done • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet • Vix malis elaboraret • Id quo natum labores corpora Success criteria • Ei eam eros imperdiet tincidunt • Soleat quaerendum eam ea • Ex eos nisl erant tantas Source: www.keepitusable.com
  57. 57. JOBS TO BE DONE (for each stage) Adding to customer experience maps
  58. 58. Evaluating existing products & services Importance of jobs to user Satisfaction with solution provided by product or service High Low
  59. 59. Find out even more about jobs-to-be-done
  60. 60. http://jobstobedone.org/ https://jtbd.info/https://jobs-to-be-done.com/ Jobs-to-be-done websites
  61. 61. Any questions?
  62. 62. www.uxforthemasses.com THANK YOU :-) @neilturnerux slideshare.net/neiljamesturner

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