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Where is Everyone? Community-Building Online

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Where is Everyone? Community-Building Online

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Presentation covering the importance of your online community. Includes tips for how to define, establish and maintain your community online.

Presentation covering the importance of your online community. Includes tips for how to define, establish and maintain your community online.

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Where is Everyone? Community-Building Online

  1. 1. WHERE IS EVERYONE? Jen Riehle, NC State University
  2. 2. Who am I? Jen Riehle Technology Outreach Specialist NC State University Raleigh, NC
  3. 3. What am I doing here? Community. Who are they? How do you find them? How do you get them to follow you and keep following you?
  4. 4. Def: Community noun, plural: -ties 1. a social group of any size whose members reside in a specific locality, share government, and often have a common cultural or historical heritage; 2. a social, religious, occupational, or other group sharing common characteristics or interests or perceiving itself as distinct in some respect from the larger society within which it exists.
  5. 5. Def: Community noun, plural: -ties 1. a social group of any size whose members reside in a specific locality, share government, and often have a common cultural or historical heritage; 2. a social, religious, occupational, or other group sharing common characteristics or interests or perceiving itself as distinct in some respect from the larger society within which it exists. Key ways to find and engage your community - mutual interests and goals
  6. 6. Who is in the community? According to 2011 Pew Internet Project Report: pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Social- Networking-Sites.aspx
  7. 7. 2005: 8% of adults had EVER used a social networking site pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Social-Networking-Sites.aspx
  8. 8. 2011: 65% of adults online use social networking sites pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Social-Networking-Sites.aspx % of users stable across races, education levels, income levels Some old stats hold true: still more younger users than older but you’d be surprised...
  9. 9. 51% of adults aged 50-64 use social networking sites pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Social-Networking-Sites.aspx 33% of those over 65; up 150% in 2 years
  10. 10. What about your community? Governing bodies National and international organizations relating to your work Local (city, state) organizations and media outlets Volunteers Anyone who’s following you Who should you be engaging with? Where should you look for followers? Look at some of those “anyone’s”. What’s bring them to you? Go engage them.
  11. 11. How Communities Work
  12. 12. Community Interactions 3 kinds... production promotion support
  13. 13. Production Successful communities share in the production of content, ideas, attitudes and goals. Look for other groups you would consider part of the community- groups you work with, have things in common with and have similar goals, those who exist above you or below you in the organizational structure of your community Writer - big producers of content and people are ALWAYS publishing on the web
  14. 14. Promotion Share the ideas and information from your community. Communicate the goals, advice, and resources of others in your community. Share opinions and influence attitudes
  15. 15. Support crowdsourcing - provides quality solutions w/ real world focus - drives participant involvement - provides positive PR EX: Lonerider beer name contest Tools: (Google Moderator an example) How do we successfully participate in production, promotion and support online?
  16. 16. Choosing Your Tools
  17. 17. Make some goals increase brand awareness collaborate with stakeholders; gain insight optimize website; better search results and more traffic establish yourself as a thought leader; educate stakeholders increase donations
  18. 18. Make some goals increase brand awareness collaborate with stakeholders; gain insight optimize website; better search results and more traffic establish yourself as a thought leader; educate stakeholders increase donations Then pick one or two that REALLY matter to you the most
  19. 19. Use your goals to determine your tools
  20. 20. Goal: Higher traffic Recruit publicly LinkedIn is the new Yellow Pages LI has grown by 60% in the last year (windmillnetworking.com/2011/08/08) Post you job hunts online and make sure your organization is well-represented on LI. And so are you.
  21. 21. Goal: Brand loyalty Repurpose your content AllState on YouTube Dell makes presentations available on a variety of topics on Slideshare. People can use these for help or repurpose them - makes Dell a go-to source for help and advice.
  22. 22. Goal: Thought-leader Share your knowledge via podcasts WineLibrary.tv winelibrary has just hit 1000 video podcasts Started in 2006 to educate people on all aspects of wine he now has a book, a company that distributes wine samplers and has appeared on tv, radio and in dozens of newspapers and magazines
  23. 23. Goal: Increased Awareness Become a subject-matter expert Dell on Slideshare Spend lots of time and money on those ads? Make them available online! People wander around and find them - if they enjoy them they may share them.
  24. 24. Choosing the Tools Listen Learn Launch LISTEN to your audience. Find out what they use and what they want to use. LEARN about how best to take advantage of these tools; know what your investments will be (time, money, content) LAUNCH. Be ready to hit the ground running
  25. 25. Choosing the Tools Listen Learn Launch LISTEN to your audience. Find out what they use and what they want to use.
  26. 26. Choosing the Tools Listen Learn Launch LEARN about how best to take advantage of these tools; know what your investments will be (time, money, content)
  27. 27. Choosing the Tools Listen Learn Launch LAUNCH. Be ready to hit the ground running- content plan; write things ahead of time as mush as possible; long list of topics, etc.
  28. 28. Engaging Your Community
  29. 29. Grand gestures are memorable Morton’s Steakhouse; July, writer Peter Shankman landing in Newark had a steak waiting Barbie and Ken shippers online- Matel launched campaign using Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare for Ken wooing Barbie back
  30. 30. Get away from the computer Go out and meet people face-to-face. They’re much more likely to participate and engage with you online if they’ve met you in person.
  31. 31. Use Community Resources Coordinate local groups. Find or recruit people interested in your area and get them involved. Get bloggers to write about you and share your messages - then repurpose that content!
  32. 32. Feed the birds Provide useful information. Doesn’t hurt to go back to the basics from time-to-time. Why are you here? What knowledge do you have to share? What’s the latest news in your area of interest and how is it affecting your followers? - Raleigh Food Trucks
  33. 33. Set clear goals Call to action should be clear. Make it easy and fun to contribute (when possible)
  34. 34. Engage your followers Be sure to recognize comments and answer questions. Reward contributions. Use graphics and videos to draw the eye and stories to engage people.
  35. 35. There’s no place like home... Drive your users back to a HOME BASE. Information, donations, everything should run through one point so you can do intense analytics on what sites are driving your users to your information. Should be updated regularly- when you do a SM campaign that should be reflected somewhere at HOME.
  36. 36. Measuring Your Success
  37. 37. Check on Goals Using tools to monitor success: Google analytics URL shorteners that track usage (bit.ly, goo.gl) Facebook pages monitor usage Many new tools for monitoring social media usage Many metrics are the same metrics we’ve always had for marketing purposes - now framed differently Tools: Omniture, ViralHeat (built with SAS analytics), Argyle Social
  38. 38. Success You may have all kinds of data but what does “success” mean? Did you meet your goals? Measure success with correlation's, not always hard data 1. positive interactions and feedback; 2. building of new relationships; 3. in cost savings (fewer HD calls); 4. in increased donations
  39. 39. Failure Not meeting your goals: Why not? Did you pick the wrong goal? Have you given it enough time? Not following through with the requirements of the tool? Very common that we let the work we need to do get away from us. How do we get OUT of social media?
  40. 40. Remember... The goal isn’t to be good at social media. The goal is to be good at communication because of social media.
  41. 41. What to do next... Just because you haven’t posted in while doesn’t mean you should quit Does mean you should re-evaluate and fix things.
  42. 42. Bailing Inform your followers of your plans Point people to alternate resources Keep your accounts Continue to follow your online community People are following you for a reason; given them other help Keep your accounts alive so no one else can grab them - might need them later or might confuse followers Continue to communicate and participate; monitor what’s being said about you
  43. 43. Steps for Community Success 1. Find the community 2. Find out what the community wants and provide it 3. Support and contribute 4. Monitor 5. Repeat
  44. 44. Good Luck!
  45. 45. Photo Credit STÉFAN
  46. 46. Thank you! Jen Riehle, NC State University jen_riehle@ncsu.edu @ncsumarit

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