I am the Iguana Editor-in-Chief, and I’m here to provide you with grammar relief, I’ll help with your usage, mechanics, to...
Each pronoun must have a clear  antecedent:  a ‘they’ is people—two or more.  An ‘it’ or a ‘that’ or ‘this’ refer to one i...
Subject/Verb Agreement Created by Dionne Irving Edited by Nancy Craven This week’s Iguana Editor-in-Chief lesson is on:
Present Tense Agreement <ul><li>In the present tense, verbs agree with their subjects in number (singular or plural) and i...
Maintaining Agreement <ul><li>In the majority of the sentences you write, the subject comes before the verb; in many direc...
Sentences beginning with  There  and  Here <ul><li>There and here are both adverbs and can’t be subjects. In a sentence be...
Verbs that agree with antecedents <ul><li>Relative pronouns  who, which  and  that  have antecedents, nouns or pronouns to...
Maintaining Agreement <ul><li>You should make a verb agree with the subject, not with a word that comes in between.  </li>...
Prepositions <ul><li>The object of a preposition cannot be the subject of a  verb.  </li></ul><ul><li>The old scrapbook in...
Plural Subjects <ul><li>Subjects with two or more parts are compound. Subjects joined with  and  are generally plural. </l...
<ul><li>With subjects joined by  or  or  nor,  make the verb agree with the subject nearer to the verb. </li></ul><ul><li>...
Indefinite Pronouns <ul><li>Indefinite pronouns are used to refer to general rather than specific persons and things. The ...
Collective nouns and Singular nouns ending in ‘s’ <ul><li>Collective nouns are  always treated as singular ( family, jury,...
Bye now, and Happy Editing Iguana see you on the Net!
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Iguana Editor In Chief Slideshow I Subject Verb Agreement Newest

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  • Each pronoun must have a clear antecedent
  • Iguana Editor In Chief Slideshow I Subject Verb Agreement Newest

    1. 2. I am the Iguana Editor-in-Chief, and I’m here to provide you with grammar relief, I’ll help with your usage, mechanics, too If you just watch my slides, (which I made is the zoo). I usually eat flowers ot little fruits, though I’ll scarf down just about anything nice, But I also munch run-ons or gnaw that pesky comma splice. I dig up errors by their roots: usage, mechanics. Never mice. Although widely known as an herbivore, the truth is I really love sentences more. So what are the rules for pronoun use? (Really quite simple: they’re not obtuse!) Number agrees—like ‘he’ or ‘it’ for nouns that are single— Proper pronoun reference makes my dorsal spine tingle.
    2. 3. Each pronoun must have a clear antecedent: a ‘they’ is people—two or more. An ‘it’ or a ‘that’ or ‘this’ refer to one idea or thing, unless you’re hell-bent on rule breaking. What about spelling? Does that count, too? Yes! Use spell-check and master a rule, or two. Make sure proper nouns start with capital letters. Surely, you wish to impress your ‘betters’ ! The role of editor is subtle, but sure: fix mistakes big and small on an edit barrage, and disappear, like I do, using camouflage. c. N. L. Craven
    3. 4. Subject/Verb Agreement Created by Dionne Irving Edited by Nancy Craven This week’s Iguana Editor-in-Chief lesson is on:
    4. 5. Present Tense Agreement <ul><li>In the present tense, verbs agree with their subjects in number (singular or plural) and in person (first, second or third). </li></ul><ul><li>The present tense ending –s (or –es) is used a on a verb if its subject is third person singular; otherwise it takes no ending. </li></ul>
    5. 6. Maintaining Agreement <ul><li>In the majority of the sentences you write, the subject comes before the verb; in many direct questions, part of the verb comes before the subject. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: What did Ted say ? </li></ul>
    6. 7. Sentences beginning with There and Here <ul><li>There and here are both adverbs and can’t be subjects. In a sentence beginning with either of these words, the subject always comes after the verb. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>There is several reasons for her success. (WRONG) </li></ul><ul><li>‘ is’ is a singular verb and ‘ there’ cannot act as the subject, so the subject is ‘reasons’ which is plural </li></ul><ul><li>There are several reasons for her success. (RIGHT) </li></ul>
    7. 8. Verbs that agree with antecedents <ul><li>Relative pronouns who, which and that have antecedents, nouns or pronouns to which they refer. Relative pronouns used as subjects of subordinate clauses take verbs that agree with their antecedents. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Dr. Barker knew that Frank was the only one of his sons who was responsible enough to handle the estate. </li></ul><ul><li>The antecedent of ‘ who’ is ‘ one ,’ not ‘ sons .’ </li></ul>
    8. 9. Maintaining Agreement <ul><li>You should make a verb agree with the subject, not with a word that comes in between. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: High levels of air pollution cause damage to the respiratory tract. </li></ul><ul><li>Phrases beginning with the prepositions as well as, in addition to, accompanied by, together with and along with do not make a singular subject plural. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: The governor, as well as his press secretary , was shot. </li></ul>
    9. 10. Prepositions <ul><li>The object of a preposition cannot be the subject of a verb. </li></ul><ul><li>The old scrapbook in the closet under the storage box belongs to my grandmother. </li></ul><ul><li>In this sentence, ‘scrapbook’ is the subject, and ‘boxes’ is the object of the preposition ‘under’. </li></ul>
    10. 11. Plural Subjects <ul><li>Subjects with two or more parts are compound. Subjects joined with and are generally plural. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: A small sign and a campaign button are the only indication of the candidate’s presence. </li></ul><ul><li>Exceptions: When the parts of the subject form a single unit or refer to the same thing, treat the subject as singular. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Sara’s friend and advisor was surprised by her decision. </li></ul><ul><li>The exception does not apply when followed by the word each . </li></ul>
    11. 12. <ul><li>With subjects joined by or or nor, make the verb agree with the subject nearer to the verb. </li></ul><ul><li>The firefighter or the captain is meeting with the television crew. </li></ul><ul><li>Neither Sammy nor Carla seem to be bothered by the messes that result. </li></ul>
    12. 13. Indefinite Pronouns <ul><li>Indefinite pronouns are used to refer to general rather than specific persons and things. The following indefinite pronouns are always singular: </li></ul><ul><li>another each everything </li></ul><ul><li>no one somebody either </li></ul><ul><li>anybody neither nothing </li></ul><ul><li>someone anyone everybody </li></ul><ul><li>nobody one something </li></ul><ul><li>anything everyone </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone around the accident was silent. </li></ul><ul><li>Neither of the girls brought her umbrella. </li></ul>
    13. 14. Collective nouns and Singular nouns ending in ‘s’ <ul><li>Collective nouns are always treated as singular ( family, jury, team etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Example: The entire flock was sitting on the power line. </li></ul><ul><li>UNLESS the meaning is clearly plural. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: A young couple were arguing about politics while holding hands. </li></ul>
    14. 15. Bye now, and Happy Editing Iguana see you on the Net!

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