Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Integrated Unit Project Master

343 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

Integrated Unit Project Master

  1. 1. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley ReddingTeam: The Energized ExhilaratorsTheme: Sub-Saharan Africa7th grade: Social Studies, Science, English Language ArtsSummary: We will investigate how geography, demographic trends, and environmentalconditions affect the modern societies in Sub-Saharan Africa. We will focus on the urban, rural,and tribal regions of Sub-Saharan Africa and investigate how trends in weather patterns, disease,and other genetic conditions affect cultures and societies.Science Summary: Students will be introduced to the water cycle and discuss and analyze what happens when there is too little or too much water in an environment. Malaria and sickle cell will be discussed—and after Punnett squares and hereditary are taught, students will construct a tribe member based on their characteristics.Monday: Introduction of the Water Cycle/Regions in AfricaScience: 7.E.1.2 Explain how the cycling of water in and out of the atmosphere and atmosphericconditions relate to the weather patterns on earth.ELA: 7.W.3.a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view andintroducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally andlogically.Social Studies: 7.G.1.1 Explain how environmental conditions and human response to thoseconditions influence modern societies and regions (e.g. natural barriers, scarcity of resources andfactors that influence settlement).Activity: Study the water cycle and write a narrative from the point of view of a raindrop.Students will investigate the region of Africa (desert, grasslands, mountains or tropical forest)that they were assigned during the Advisement period, and write the narrative as if the raindropfell in that region. Students are to have illustrations and a descriptive narrative. This narrativewill be uploaded on to the group Museum Box.Tuesday: The Effects of Drought in Africa/ Natural ResourcesScience: 7.E.1.2 Explain how the cycling of water in and out of the atmosphere and atmosphericconditions relate to the weather patterns on earth.Social Studies: 7.G.2.1 Construct maps, charts, and graphs to explain data about geographicphenomena (e.g. migration patterns and population and resource distribution patterns).
  2. 2. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley ReddingActivity: What happens when there is not a lot of water? Discuss drought and how it forcespeople to not be able to farm; consequently, mining becomes a prevalent way to bring in income.(Southern tip of Africa). Use information on the natural resources found in Africa (coal, copper,oil, diamonds and gold) to construct an income graph (circle/bar) based on the value of eachresource. This chart will be uploaded to the group Museum Box.Wednesday: Heredity/Malaria and Other DiseasesScience: 7.L.2.2 Infer patterns of heredity using information from Punnett squares and pedigreeanalysis. 7.L.2.3 Explain the impact of the environment and lifestyle choices on biologicalinheritance (to include common genetic diseases) and survival.Social Studies: 7.H.2.4 Analyze the economic, political, and social impacts of disease (e.g.smallpox, malaria, bubonic plague, AIDS and avian flu) in modern societies.Math: 7.SP.5 Understand that the probability of a chance event is a number between 0 and 1 thatexpresses the likelihood of the event occurring. Larger numbers indicate greater likelihood. Aprobability near 0 indicates an unlikely event, a probability around 1/2 indicates an eventthat is neither unlikely nor likely, and a probability near 1 indicates a likely event.Activity: What happens when there is too much water? Areas where there is a lot of water inAfrica include: grasslands and rainforest/Angola, Zambia, and Malawi. These are areas wheremalaria is prevalent. What is the connection with sickle cell anemia? AIDS? Start with Punnettsquares—introduce the concept of heredity and discuss probability.Thursday: Heredity (Continued)Science: 7.L.2.2 Infer patterns of heredity using information from Punnett squares and pedigreeanalysis.Social Studies: 7.H.2.4 Analyze the economic, political, and social impacts of disease (e.g.smallpox, malaria, bubonic plague, AIDS and avian flu) in modern societies.Math: 7.SP.5 Understand that the probability of a chance event is a number between 0 and 1 thatexpresses the likelihood of the event occurring. Larger numbers indicate greater likelihood. Aprobability near 0 indicates an unlikely event, a probability around 1/2 indicates an eventthat is neither unlikely nor likely, and a probability near 1 indicates a likely event.Activity: Demonstrate how to create Punnett squares. Use Punnett squares and probability tocreate a member from a tribe. Use characteristics such as eye color, earlobes (attached/detached),complexion, sickle cell, widow‟s peak, blood type, etc. This person is then to be drawn andadded as a member of each tribe. This drawing will be scanned and uploaded to the groupMuseum Box.
  3. 3. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley ReddingSocial Studies Summary: In Social Studies, the goal for students is to connect how elements of geographic regions, weather patterns, natural resources, and genetic conditions affect cultures and modern societies within Sub-Saharan Africa. The focus of the unit will progress from a general overview on the specific biomes in Sub-Saharan Africa, to more individualized lessons on the urban, rural, and tribal areas of the region. Over the course of the week, students will complete activities that will be included in their virtual Museum Box, the integrated curriculum project for this unit. Activities that will be completed in the Social Studies class for this project include: a weather forecast for a specific region in Sub-Saharan Africa, an advertisement (flyer) for a mining company located in an urban area, examples of newspaper and/or journal articles on Malaria, and a short essay discussing the presence of tribes in modern Africa. The information gathered throughout the week in Social Studies, Science, and English Language Arts will be presented on Friday during the African Culture Day.Monday- Overview of Geography of Sub-Saharan AfricaSocial Studies: 7.G.1.1. Explain how environmental conditions and human response to thoseconditions influences modern societies and regions (e.g. natural barriers, scarcity of resourcesand factors that influence settlement).Science: 7.E.1.4. Predict weather conditions and patterns based on information obtained from: • Weather data collected from direct observations and measurement (wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity and air pressure). • Weather maps, satellites and radar • Cloud shapes and types and associated elevationInformation and Technology: 7.TT.1.1 Use appropriate technology tools and other resources toaccess information. 7.RP.1.1 Implement a collaborative research process activity that is groupselected. 7.TT.1.3 Use appropriate technology tools and other resources to design products toshare information with others (e.g. multimedia presentations, Web 2.0 tools, graphics, podcasts,and audio files).Activities: After being introduced to the countries and biomes present in Sub-Saharan Africa,students will work in their cooperative learning groups to research the region they were assignedduring the Advisement period. Based on their research, students will create a 7-day weatherforecast for their region. Students will then upload their weather forecasts to the group MuseumBox.
  4. 4. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley ReddingResources:Interactive maps of Africa: http://worldmap.harvard.edu/africamap/http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/Africa-georegion.htmlhttp://www.pbs.org/wnet/africa/explore/index_flash.htmlClimate/Weather: http://www.wunderground.com/http://www.climate-zone.com/continent/africa/Museum Box (used all week): http://museumbox.e2bn.org/Tuesday: Urban regions of Sub-Saharan AfricaSocial Studies: 7.G.1.1. Explain how environmental conditions and human response to thoseconditions influences modern societies and regions (e.g. natural barriers, scarcity of resourcesand factors that influence settlement). 7.E.1.1. Explain how competition for resources affects theeconomic relationship among nations (e.g. colonialism, imperialism, globalization andinterdependence).English Language Arts: 7.SL.5. 5. Include multimedia components and visual displays inpresentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points.Information and Technology: 7.TT.1.1 Use appropriate technology tools and other resources toaccess information. 7.TT.1.3 Use appropriate technology tools and other resources to designproducts to share information with others (e.g. multimedia presentations, Web 2.0 tools,graphics, podcasts, and audio files).Activities: The students will learn about the environmental and economic factors that lead to thedevelopment of large urban areas in the southern region of Sub-Saharan Africa. The lesson willfocus on the abundance of natural resources available in these areas. Students will each create anadvertisement (flyer) for a fictional mining company in this region on their laptops. Studentsmust include the location of the company, the natural resource that is being acquired, salary foremployees, etc. Students will then present their digital flyers in hopes of convincing others thattheir company is superior to the rest. The digital flyers will then be uploaded on to the groupMuseum Box.Resources:Interactive map of resources in African Countries:http://exploringafrica.matrix.msu.edu/teachers/curriculum/m6/activity4.php
  5. 5. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley ReddingWednesday: Rural regions of Sub-Saharan AfricaSocial Studies: 7.G.1.1. Explain how environmental conditions and human response to thoseconditions influences modern societies and regions (e.g. natural barriers, scarcity of resourcesand factors that influence settlement). 7.H.2.4. Analyze the economic, political, and socialimpacts of disease (e.g. smallpox, malaria, bubonic plague, AIDS and avian flu) in modernsocieties.Science: 7.L.2.3 Explain the impact of the environment and lifestyle choices on biologicalinheritance (to include common genetic diseases) and survival.English Language Arts: 7.RL.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze itsdevelopment over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. 7.SL.4. 4.Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner withpertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequatevolume, and clear pronunciationInformation and Technology: 7.TT.1.1 Use appropriate technology tools and other resources toaccess information.Activities: The students will learn about the characteristics of people living in rural regions ofSub-Saharan Africa. The focus of the lesson will be on how diseases, specifically malaria, affectthe health of people in these regions. The class will read a variety of news and journal articlesabout the impact of malaria and discuss how the authors develop their ideas over the course ofthe text using statistics and other forms of scientific data for support. Students will then use theirlaptops to find an additional article on the topic and present it to the class. Students will uploadtheir articles to their group Museum Box.Resources:Interactive map (population density, presence of disease, etc.):http://worldmap.harvard.edu/africamap/News articles about malaria: “10 Facts on Malaria in Africa”http://www.afro.who.int/en/clusters-a-programmes/dpc/malaria/features/2287-10-facts-on-malaria-in-africa.html“Africa‟s Malaria Death Toll Still „Outrageously High‟”http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/06/0612_030612_malaria.html“Progress Against Malaria in Africa Is Real but Fragile”http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2068667,00.htmlThursday- Tribes/tribal regions in Sub-Saharan AfricaSocial Studies: 7.G.1.3. Explain how natural disasters (e.g. flooding, earthquakes, monsoonsand tsunamis), preservation efforts and human modification of the environment (e.g. recycling,
  6. 6. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley Reddingplanting trees, deforestation, pollution, irrigation systems and climate change) affect modernsociety and regions. 7.C.1.1. Explain how culture unites and divides modern societies andregions (e.g. enslavement of various peoples, caste system, religious conflict and SocialDarwinism).English Language Arts: 7.W.7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawingon several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research andinvestigation.Information and Technology: 7.TT.1.2 Use appropriate technology tools and other resources toorganize information (e.g. graphic organizers, databases, spreadsheets, and desktop publishing).Activities: Students will need to draw from prior knowledge gathered during the week on theurban and rural regions of Sub-Saharan Africa to investigate and answer the question: “Whyhave tribal groups remained in Africa?” Students will conduct research on the recent history ofmodern tribes in Africa searching for evidence of the presence of slavery, social caste systems,religious practices, and/or Social Darwinism. Students will then create a graphic organizeroutlining the benefits and consequences of people remaining in tribes vs. joining modern society.The charts will be uploaded to the group Museum Box.ResourcesInformation about tribes: http://www.africaguide.com/culture/tribes/index.htmhttp://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2011/04/01/uncontacted-tribes-the-last-free-people-on-earth/Graphic organizer templates: http://www.exploratree.org.uk/English Language Arts Summary: Students will be making connections with what they have learned in theScience and Social Studies Classes in their English Class. They will be learning about theKalahari Desert and how the environment affects a tribe that lives there. They will learn aboutthe African rain dances and make their own rain dance instruments, dance, and videotape it toshow on Culture day. They will learn about the traditional African Healers and compare andcontrast the healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa to the United States‟ healthcare. They will alsolearn about the different types of folktales and be able to distinguish one type from another. Thestudents will work on their public speaking by telling their own made-up folktales on cultureday.
  7. 7. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley ReddingMonday: Tribes: Kalahari Desert/ Bushmen TribeEnglish Language Arts: 7.L.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard Englishcapitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 7.RI.1 Cite several pieces of textualevidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from thetext. 7.W.2.a Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts,and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, andcause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimediawhen useful to aiding comprehension. 7.W.2.b. Develop the topic with relevant facts,definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. 7.W.3. Writenarratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevantdescriptive details. 7.W.6.Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writingand link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking toand citing sources. 7.W.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing onseveral sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research andinvestigation.Social Studies: 7.C.1.2. Explain how cultural expressions (e.g. art, literature, architecture andmusic) influence modern society.Information and Technology: 7.TT.1.1. Use appropriate technology tools and other resourcesto access information.ActivityI will make a webquest where they will research for the following assignment:Students are to write an email (at least 100 words) to a friend. In the email students are to: 1. Describe the environment the Bushmen Tribe live in 2. Describe the different ways the Bushmen have adapted to the environment (in terms of movement, building their shelters, search for food and water and clothing) 3. Explain the impacts the Bushmen have on their environmentThis email will be saved and uploaded to the group Museum Box.Resources:http://www.child-sponsorship.com/kalahari_desert.htmlhttp://myths.e2bn.org/mythsandlegends/origins2490-kaangs-people.htmlTuesday: Water Cycle- Rain in AfricaEnglish Language Arts:Social Studies: 7.C.1.2 Explain how cultural expressions (e.g. art, literature, architecture andmusic) influence modern society.
  8. 8. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley ReddingInformation and Technology: 7.TT.1.1 Use appropriate technology tools and other resources toaccess information.Activity: Talk and read about the history of rain dance. In their tribal groups, students will makea rain stick and drums. After viewing a video of a tribal rain dance, students will use theirinstruments and choreograph their own. The dances will be recorded and uploaded to the groupMuseum Box.Resources:http://www.jpanafrican.com/docs/vol4no6/4.6-10KilumiRain.pdfhttp://www.krugerpark.co.za/africa_bushmen_p2.htmlWednesday: Medicine and HealthcareEnglish Language Arts: 7.L.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard Englishcapitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.7.RI.1 Cite several pieces of textualevidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from thetext.7.W.1.a Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize thereasons and evidence logically.Science: 7.L.2.3 Explain the impact of the environment and lifestyle choices on biologicalinheritance (to include common genetic diseases) and survivalInformation and Technology: 7.TT.1.1 Use appropriate technology tools and other resources toaccess information.Activity: Learn about Inyangas and Isangomas. Make a chart comparing and contrasting thehealers of South Africa to United States healthcareResources: http://wiki.ulwazi.org/index.php5?title=South_African_Traditional_Healers_-_Inyanga_and_IsangomaThursday: FolktalesEnglish Language Arts: 7.SL.1.c Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others‟questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back ontopic as needed. 7.L.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard Englishcapitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 7.W.9. Draw evidence from literary or
  9. 9. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley Reddinginformational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.7.RL. 3. Analyze how particularelements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).Social Studies: 7.C.1.2 Explain how cultural expressions (e.g. art, literature, architecture andmusic) influence modern society.Activity: Students will learn about four different types of folk tales and the elements of eachkind. Students will then split in to their tribal groups and write their own folk tale. Studentsshould memorize their folktale to tell on culture day. The folk tales should be uploaded to thegroup Museum Box.Resources:http://images.library.uiuc.edu/projects/tdc/lessonplans/AfricanFolkTales.asphttp://www.slideshare.net/amie2372/elements-of-a-folktale#btnNextFriday: Integrated African Culture DaySocial Studies: 7.C.1. Understand how cultural values influence relationships betweenindividuals, groups and political entities in modern societies and regions. 7.C.1.2. Explain howcultural expressions (e.g. art, literature, architecture and music) influence modern society.English Language Arts: 7.SL.1.Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues,building on others‟ ideas and expressing their own clearly. 7.SL.1.a. Come to discussionsprepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation byreferring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.7.SL.5. 5. Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claimsand findings and emphasize salient points.Information and Technology: 7.TT.1.3 Use appropriate technology tools and other resources todesign products to share information with others (e.g. multimedia presentations, Web 2.0 tools,graphics, podcasts,and audio files).Activity: There will be no formal class periods this day. In the morning, during an extendedadvisement period, students will get in their cooperative learning groups and make sure theyhave completed the Museum Box checklist. The checklist must be signed off by the Advisementteacher. After the Advisement period, all students will meet in the auditorium, and Culture Daywill begin. Throughout the day, the different tribes will present information that they have
  10. 10. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley Reddinggathered all week in each of the classes. Some presentations/activities include: generalinformation about the tribe, performance of the rain dance, presentation of tribe member createdin Science, and group folk tale. Students will use their group Museum Boxes to present theinformation.
  11. 11. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley Redding ResourcesIntegrated:Museum Box- http://museumbox.e2bn.org/Social Studies:Interactive maps of Africa: http://worldmap.harvard.edu/africamap/http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/Africa-georegion.htmlhttp://www.pbs.org/wnet/africa/explore/index_flash.htmlClimate/Weather: http://www.wunderground.com/http://www.climate-zone.com/continent/africa/Interactive map of resources in African Countries:http://exploringafrica.matrix.msu.edu/teachers/curriculum/m6/activity4.phpInteractive map (population density, presence of disease, etc.):http://worldmap.harvard.edu/africamap/News articles about malaria: “10 Facts on Malaria in Africa”http://www.afro.who.int/en/clusters-a-programmes/dpc/malaria/features/2287-10-facts-on-malaria-in-africa.html“Africa‟s Malaria Death Toll Still „Outrageously High‟”http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/06/0612_030612_malaria.html“Progress Against Malaria in Africa Is Real but Fragile”http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2068667,00.htmlInformation about tribes: http://www.africaguide.com/culture/tribes/index.htmhttp://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2011/04/01/uncontacted-tribes-the-last-free-people-on-earth/Graphic organizer templates: http://www.exploratree.org.uk/English Language Arts:Kalahari Desert-http://www.child-sponsorship.com/kalahari_desert.htmlBushmen-http://myths.e2bn.org/mythsandlegends/origins2490-kaangs-people.htmlRain Dance/ Instruments- http://www.jpanafrican.com/docs/vol4no6/4.6-10KilumiRain.pdfhttp://www.krugerpark.co.za/africa_bushmen_p2.html
  12. 12. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley ReddingMedicine- http://wiki.ulwazi.org/index.php5?title=South_African_Traditional_Healers_-_Inyanga_and_IsangomaFolk Tales- http://images.library.uiuc.edu/projects/tdc/lessonplans/AfricanFolkTales.asphttp://www.slideshare.net/amie2372/elements-of-a-folktale#btnNext
  13. 13. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley Redding Museum Box Integrated Unit ProjectFor this unit, students will work in groups to complete a virtual Museum Box presentation aboutAfrica. The box will contain information and documents that students create throughout the weekin each of the classes. Students will be required to have a compartment in their Museum Box foreach day of the week. Students will present the information from the Museum Boxes on Fridayduring the African Culture Day.List of items that should be included in the Museum Box:Advisement:  Tribe information: name, location, language, religion, etc.Science:  Raindrop narrative  Chart of natural resources in Africa  Results of heredity activity, including scanned image of the drawn tribe memberSocial Studies:  Weather forecast of specified region  Advertisement for company  News articles on malaria in Africa  Graphic organizer on the presence of tribes in Africa today (pros/cons)English Language Arts  E-mail about the Bushmen  Recorded rain dance/ picture of instruments made in class  Comparison/Contrast chart about Inyanga and Isangomas  Group folk tale
  14. 14. EDUC 365 Courtney Phillips, Maggie Pogue, Hayley Redding Advisement : Daily TopicsStudents will get a brief overview of the theme being covered in the blocks each day. Studentswill be able to have a general idea of what topics and key terms they will hear throughout theday.Monday: Students will be split into groups of four by their homeroom teacher. These will betheir cooperative learning groups for the week in all classes. These groups will become their“tribe” for the week, and they will complete work in each class to help them develop their tribalidentity. Today, they will also be assigned a geographic region/biome in Africa (desert,grasslands, mountains or tropical forest) that they will explore in Social Studies and Science.Students will complete a Museum Box presentation that will be used on Friday during theAfrican Culture Day to help display information about their tribe.Tuesday: Advisors will present students with information on drought. Students will thenbrainstorm what effects they believe drought has on an environment. How will environmentalconditions affect the economy? Will people be able to farm, or will they need to find othernatural resources to make money? Throughout the day, students will learn about the effects andcompare them with their previous assumptions.Wednesday: Advisors will briefly introduce the topic of malaria. Students will learn how thedisease is spread, the effects it has on humans, and how it can be treated.Thursday: Advisors will present information on the various tribes that remain in Africa.Students will learn about characteristics that define tribes including: language, religion, roles inthe community, art, music, etc. Students will need to create defining characteristics for theirtribe, and include it on the Museum Box.Friday: Advisement will be extended to 1 hour today so students may complete their MuseumBoxes. All elements from the checklist must be met in order for groups to present during AfricanCulture Day.

×