Grasping Differentiation
for Advanced Students
Amanda Vickers – East Lincoln Middle School
Erin Deans – West Lincoln Middl...
What We Know About Advanced Learners
 http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/101043/chapters/The_Rationale_for_Differenti...
Common Reasons Why Teachers Don’t Differentiate
We tend to teach the way we were taught.
We tend to rely upon district p...
How Teachers Make It All Work
 Start small – but start somewhere!
 Differentiation for small blocks of time. Use
anchor ...
GREAT! How does that work?
MUST know your students
Flexible grouping
Homogeneous Groups
Heterogeneous Groups
Peer/Sel...
Ways to Differentiate
•Thinking Skill: The verb – what students will be doing
•Content: The content – what students will b...
Thinking Skill
What Students Do
www.byrdseed.com/differentiator
Differentiate Thinking Skill – What Will Your Students Do?
With Bloom’s Taxonomy and the Differentiator
Using chapter th...
After Using the Differentiator.
Using chapter three in your textbook, write a persuasive
essay judging the significance o...
Let’s Tier the Assignment
Using chapter three in your textbook, judge the significance of
the contributions of three impo...
Differentiate the Content
 Using chapter three in your social studies book, list three inventions from
the Renaissance pe...
Differentiate Resources
Internet sources
Articles
Encyclopedias
Other textbooks
Maps
Art
Differentiate Product
A great place to introduce choice
 Using chapter three in your social studies book, list three even...
When to Differentiate
Whole group – to add more rigor to classroom lesson
Flexible groups – to add levels of rigor to me...
Science
Content Specific Ideas
http://www.pealcenter.org/images/Hendrickson.Science_Think_Tac_Toe.pdf
Structured Creation
http://www.byrdseed.com/creating-in-science/
1. Motivate and Excite Students – Hint at Final Product
1...
Extensions and Other Ideas
 Research who discovered each of the planets. Create a scientist
who discovered your planet.
...
Space Exploration From Beginning To Present
Change the Process-Add Depth
Change the product
 Most students are given set ...
Space Exploration, continued.
 Differentiation: Advanced students are given a set websites to
find articles to read and c...
Differentiating with Assessments
 If we expect gifted students to learn information at a more rigorous level
than the gen...
Recognize Fallacies
Make several purposely-flawed statements about
power sources.
 Example: “Our city should switch enti...
Judging Criteria
Ask students to rank the five power sources according to
various criteria (cleanliness, ease of use, pow...
Priortize
Then ask the students to prioritize which criteria is most
important when selecting a power source.
Again, in ...
Grading the Assessment
 The most difficult part of using this type of assessment is how to grade.
 Assign four points to...
Math
Content Specific Ideas
Box Office Totals
http://www.byrdseed.com/math-project-box-office-totals/
Gather authentic data from Box Office Mojo.
As...
Box Office Totals cont.
http://www.byrdseed.com/math-project-box-office-totals/
 Students become a movie executive who wa...
Vacation Time
http://2differentiate.pbworks.com/f/VacationMathTiered.JPG
 Calculate the approximate cost of gas
 Tier 1 ...
Google Earth Ski Slopes
http://2differentiate.pbworks.com/f/Google+Earth+Ski+Slopes.pdf
Students will use Google Earth to ...
Social Studies
Content Specific Ideas
The Great Depression
http://2differentiate.pbworks.com/f/SocMSTieredByContent_Process_Product.pdf
 Tier 1 – This photo wa...
Recreate in 3D form a famous work of
architecture or landform from your China.
Compare and contrast this piece to one
piec...
5 Themes – Constructing Knowledge
Working in small groups, ask students to locate the 10 largest
cities.
Common features...
Bumper Sticker
Rubrics for Social Studies
Tier 1/Society Issues Possible
Points
Societal Message clearly stated 30
Illustr...
Bumper Sticker
Rubrics for Social Studies, continued
Tier 2/ Economic Issues Possible
Points
Economic message is clearly s...
Bumper Sticker
Rubrics for Social Studies, continued
Tier 3/Political Issues Possible
Points
Political message is clearly ...
Language Arts
Content Specific Ideas
www.byrdseed.com/respondo
SCAMPER using Respondo!
 Combine the setting of “Eleven” with that of “Thank You,
Ma'am.” Explain how this would affect t...
Writing Biographies
http://2differentiate.pbworks.com/f/Biography_Tiered.JPG
 Tier 1 – Write a biography of your famous p...
Category Swan Dive
20-18 points
Freestyle
17-15 points
Doggie Paddle
14-12 points
Organization Carefully organized with va...
Think Dots – Vocabulary Review
http://curry.virginia.edu/uploads/resourceLibrary/nagc_cubing__think_dots.pdf
Connect It
An...
Just Remember…
everyonegetting
thesamething.
everyonegetting
what they need in order
to be
Great Resources
 http://ncaig.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/AIG+Booster+Shot+Series
 www.birdseed.com
 www.hoagiesgifted.org
 w...
Your Turn
Tic-Tac-Toe is a simple way to give students alternative ways of
exploring and expressing key ideas and using ke...
Grasping Differentiation for Advanced Students
Grasping Differentiation for Advanced Students
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Grasping Differentiation for Advanced Students

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Grasping Differentiation for Advanced Students

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Grasping Differentiation for Advanced Students

  1. 1. Grasping Differentiation for Advanced Students Amanda Vickers – East Lincoln Middle School Erin Deans – West Lincoln Middle School Pam Harris – North Lincoln Middle School Rhoda Maynard-Yoder – Lincolnton Middle School avickers@lincoln.k12.nc.us edeans@lincoln.k12.nc.us pharris@lincoln.k12.nc.us rmaynardyoder@lincoln.k12.nc.us
  2. 2. What We Know About Advanced Learners  http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/101043/chapters/The_Rationale_for_Differentiated_Instructi on_in_Mixed-Ability_Classrooms.aspx  Although they typically do well in school, they can be lazy thinkers.  The brain is a muscle that needs to challenged.  Grades become more important that ideas.  Having the highest grade is more valuable than making new discoveries and taking intellectual risks.  Perfectionism is bred within the praise for high grades.  Students don’t learn how to struggle, fail, and try again which can lead to under-achievement. Why do it if I know I can’t?  Although they may have high self-esteem, they may believe that they can complete the tasks to reach seemingly unattainable goals (not develop self-efficacy)  Their study and coping skills are underdeveloped.  When hard work is required, many become frustrated and resentful, and struggle with “uncertainty”
  3. 3. Common Reasons Why Teachers Don’t Differentiate We tend to teach the way we were taught. We tend to rely upon district prescribed materials. We tend to use what has worked in the past and resist mandates that lead us out of our teaching comfort zone. We are pressured to cover the content and follow pacing guides. We don’t have time to effectively plan for differentiation.
  4. 4. How Teachers Make It All Work  Start small – but start somewhere!  Differentiation for small blocks of time. Use anchor activities.  Grow slowly – but grow!  Try creating one differentiated lesson per unit, one project per semester, etc.  Give structured choices more often.  Step back and reflect.  Talk with students regularly to get input.  Give thoughtful directions.  Work together with colleagues.  Bring principals and parents on board.  Continue to empower students.  Don’t do things for them that they can’t do for themselves.  Don’t assume a task is too difficult until a student proves it is too difficult.
  5. 5. GREAT! How does that work? MUST know your students Flexible grouping Homogeneous Groups Heterogeneous Groups Peer/Self Assessments Rubrics
  6. 6. Ways to Differentiate •Thinking Skill: The verb – what students will be doing •Content: The content – what students will be learning •Resource: The information – where students will get information •Product: The result – what students will create
  7. 7. Thinking Skill What Students Do
  8. 8. www.byrdseed.com/differentiator
  9. 9. Differentiate Thinking Skill – What Will Your Students Do? With Bloom’s Taxonomy and the Differentiator Using chapter three in your social studies book, list three important events, people, inventions or discoveries from the Renaissance. Very low thinking skill - listing
  10. 10. After Using the Differentiator. Using chapter three in your textbook, write a persuasive essay judging the significance of the contributions of three important events, people, inventions or discoveries from the Renaissance period. Thinking skill – judge Content – significance and contribution Resource – text book Product – persuasive essay
  11. 11. Let’s Tier the Assignment Using chapter three in your textbook, judge the significance of the contributions of three important events, people, inventions or discoveries from the Renaissance in a persuasive essay. (High) …compare the significance of three people or discoveries from the Renaissance in an essay. (Low) …defend the significance of three important events, people, inventions or discoveries from the Renaissance in a persuasive essay. (Middle)
  12. 12. Differentiate the Content  Using chapter three in your social studies book, list three inventions from the Renaissance period.  Content –inventions  Thinking skill – list  Resource – textbook  Product - list  List three inventions from the Renaissance period that have changed over time and are still used today.  List three inventions from the Renaissance period that have contributed to other discoveries.
  13. 13. Differentiate Resources Internet sources Articles Encyclopedias Other textbooks Maps Art
  14. 14. Differentiate Product A great place to introduce choice  Using chapter three in your social studies book, list three events, people, inventions or discoveries from the Renaissance. Students may create a painting, an encyclopedia article, or a multi-media presentation.  Graphic presentations  Mixed-Media presentations  Written presentations  Construction presentations  Oral presentations  Survey & Graph presentations  Database presentations  Arts & Games presentations  Other types of presentations
  15. 15. When to Differentiate Whole group – to add more rigor to classroom lesson Flexible groups – to add levels of rigor to meet the needs of students Individualized plans – to meet the needs of students with exceptionalities Choice – give three options to students and allow them to self- differentiate
  16. 16. Science Content Specific Ideas
  17. 17. http://www.pealcenter.org/images/Hendrickson.Science_Think_Tac_Toe.pdf
  18. 18. Structured Creation http://www.byrdseed.com/creating-in-science/ 1. Motivate and Excite Students – Hint at Final Product 1. You are going to create a planet! 2. Model by creating your own planet as you go through lesson 2. Teach content, focusing on patterns 3. Scaffold your questions 1. Is your planet an inner or outer planet? 2. Which inner or outer planet is yours most similar to? 3. What is the most significant difference (atmosphere, size, moons)? 4. In what way does this difference most strongly affect your planet? 4. Continue asking questions that build on complexity and demand realistic explanation. 5. Allow for creativity if they can realistically explain the causes and effects for their ideas.
  19. 19. Extensions and Other Ideas  Research who discovered each of the planets. Create a scientist who discovered your planet.  Leave the solar system and examine:  Other types of terrestrial planets, including the “diamond planet!”  The five types of gas giants.  Rogue planets: planets without a star!  Super Earths: huge earth-like planets.
  20. 20. Space Exploration From Beginning To Present Change the Process-Add Depth Change the product  Most students are given set articles to read using close reading strategies with teacher guidance. The timeline format is given to the students.
  21. 21. Space Exploration, continued.  Differentiation: Advanced students are given a set websites to find articles to read and create their own timeline with rubric.  Creativity and choice is given with this assignment.
  22. 22. Differentiating with Assessments  If we expect gifted students to learn information at a more rigorous level than the general population, then we must also assess them at higher levels as well.  Assessing knowledge of renewable and non-renewable energy sources.  Do away with the multitude of fill-in-the-blank questions and instead asked students to utilize higher level thinking skills. In doing so, you get an amazing glimpse of students’ true understanding of the material.
  23. 23. Recognize Fallacies Make several purposely-flawed statements about power sources.  Example: “Our city should switch entirely to wind power. This will reduce pollution and end global warming!” Students write a brief paragraph arguing against these statements using details from the unit.
  24. 24. Judging Criteria Ask students to rank the five power sources according to various criteria (cleanliness, ease of use, power) and offer a one sentence explanation. Then ask students to pick which power source would be best according to different scenarios. Require students to back up their thinking with evidence.
  25. 25. Priortize Then ask the students to prioritize which criteria is most important when selecting a power source. Again, in this type of question you are more interested in their thinking than their actual answer so students must back up their statements with evidence. This question forced students to decide, for example, whether solar power’s reduced efficiency actually made fossil fuels a better choice as a power source.
  26. 26. Grading the Assessment  The most difficult part of using this type of assessment is how to grade.  Assign four points to each of the short answer questions.  Four points: reasonable answer backed with evidence (three essential details).  Three points: reasonable answer but missing some evidence.  Two points: questionable response or no evidence.  One point: unreasonable answer with no evidence  This allows you to communicate that an answer is correct, but lacks sufficient evidence.
  27. 27. Math Content Specific Ideas
  28. 28. Box Office Totals http://www.byrdseed.com/math-project-box-office-totals/ Gather authentic data from Box Office Mojo. Ask students what they think was the top grossing movie was from previous year and have them guess how much money it made. Reveal the top ten movies and have students notice categories of movies (sequels, animated films, movies based on existing materials). Challenge students to create other categories (movie studio, MPAA rating, number of effects shots, score composer, or budget)
  29. 29. Box Office Totals cont. http://www.byrdseed.com/math-project-box-office-totals/  Students become a movie executive who wants to maximize profits by analyzing trends.  Tier 1 –  Calculate percents or fractions of the total gross.  Tier 2 –  Which type of movie performs best on average?  Are there differences between means and medians? Why?  Possible Products  in-person pitch  a filmed commercial  a brochure to hand out  graphs Criteria Possible Points Math is solved accurately. 50 points All parts of the project are completed. 30 points Product is neat and grammatically correct. 20 points
  30. 30. Vacation Time http://2differentiate.pbworks.com/f/VacationMathTiered.JPG  Calculate the approximate cost of gas  Tier 1 – Given the cost of gas and mpg of car  Tier 2 – Given the mpg of car  Tier 3 – Asked to approximate cost and justify answer  A family plans to average 60 miles per hour and travel 6 hours per day stopping twice to eat for an hour each time.  Tier 1 – How long will it take to get to their destination? How many nights? If cost of hotel is $80/night – calculate the hotel cost for trip to destination.  Tier 2 – How long will it take? How many nights will they need to spend in hotels? Calculate hotel cost for trip to destination.  Tier 3 – How long? How many nights? Find hotels that include breakfast. Calculate the hotel costs for each stay.
  31. 31. Google Earth Ski Slopes http://2differentiate.pbworks.com/f/Google+Earth+Ski+Slopes.pdf Students will use Google Earth to obtain satellite images for a variety of ski slopes in North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. Students must then find the angle of elevation for two ski runs using right triangles, topographical measurements, an interactive ruler and trig functions. Students will take a screen shot of the satellite image, type their findings (with pictures attached) on a Word document and use correct arithmetic to solve the angle of elevation. Project Criteria:  Describe the project in sufficient detail (50 points)  Obtain a satellite image using Google earth of a ski resort (10 points)  Use the web based ruler function to find all measurements (15 points)  Use the "hand" function to find all elevations (15 points)  Using a digital camera, take a picture of your arithmetic then place the jpeg on your Word document (10 points)
  32. 32. Social Studies Content Specific Ideas
  33. 33. The Great Depression http://2differentiate.pbworks.com/f/SocMSTieredByContent_Process_Product.pdf  Tier 1 – This photo was taken during the Great Depression. If we could hear the people talking about their life, what would they be saying?  Tier 2 – This photograph was taken during the Great Depression. From what you see in the photograph, explain how you think this room may be used by the family and why.  Tier 3 – Assess the Great Depression’s social and economic impact on this family from evidence in the photograph.Marcus Miller and family, Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division
  34. 34. Recreate in 3D form a famous work of architecture or landform from your China. Compare and contrast this piece to one piece of modern day architecture or landform. Create a timeline starting at China’s invasion of Tibet to the present day. Include 10 major events and be prepared to explain your choices. Assume the identity of Confucius. Create a journal entry reflecting the ideas, values, and components of daily life for him. Imagine that you are a citizen of China who awakens to discover that all water has evaporated. Explain in detail how this would alter your way of life. Also, do this for the town where you live. As a mapmaker, you are commissioned to create a map of China including all natural land forms, a compass rose and a scale. Write a paragraph explain how geography affects the lives of people in China. You are a famous sculptor. Create a 3D representation of Shi Huangdhi’s terra cotta warriors. Include a museum exhibit card. As a reporter, write an article for your local newspaper summarizing Genghis Khan’s invasion of China. Include 2 political cartoons – one approving his take over and the other disapproving. You are an ancient scribe. Research and use Chinese ideograms to choose 6 that best describe you and your interests. Write each ideogram on a separate piece of paper using markers or paint to best recreate the calligraphy form. You’ve hired an interior decorator to use Feng Shui to redesign your room. Draw a before and after diagram of what your room looks like and explain why the interior decorator made the changes they did. CHINA Directions: You must choose 3 activities. Your choices must be selected using a Tic-Tac-Toe pattern. http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=391322
  35. 35. 5 Themes – Constructing Knowledge Working in small groups, ask students to locate the 10 largest cities. Common features (other than population) Geographic, infrastructure, history, economy/industry, social systems End Result: Generalizations relating to the 5 themes of geography
  36. 36. Bumper Sticker Rubrics for Social Studies Tier 1/Society Issues Possible Points Societal Message clearly stated 30 Illustration matches message 30 Colorful and appealing 20 Correct punctuation/grammar 20
  37. 37. Bumper Sticker Rubrics for Social Studies, continued Tier 2/ Economic Issues Possible Points Economic message is clearly stated and uses verbal irony 30 Illustration provides details of the financial literacy 30 Colorful and appealing 20 Correct punctuation/grammar 20
  38. 38. Bumper Sticker Rubrics for Social Studies, continued Tier 3/Political Issues Possible Points Political message is clearly stated and uses verbal irony or a pun 30 Illustration provides viewer deeper understanding of the topic 30 Graphically appealing – with appropriate fonts and sizes 20 Correct punctuation/grammar 20
  39. 39. Language Arts Content Specific Ideas
  40. 40. www.byrdseed.com/respondo
  41. 41. SCAMPER using Respondo!  Combine the setting of “Eleven” with that of “Thank You, Ma'am.” Explain how this would affect the conflict in “Thank You, Ma'am.”  Eliminate the conflict in Holes. Analyze how this would affect the characters.  Minimize the tone in “Harrison Bergeron”. Show how this would affect its plot.
  42. 42. Writing Biographies http://2differentiate.pbworks.com/f/Biography_Tiered.JPG  Tier 1 – Write a biography of your famous person. Use the timeline you created to help you organize your ideas. Remember to answer the following questions as you write:  When and were was this person born? Where did your person live while growing up? What was his or her childhood like? What did he or she do when he/she became an adult? Why is your person famous?  Tier 2 – Write a biography of your famous person. Use your timeline to help you organize your ideas. Remember to emphasize why your person is famous.  Tier 3 – Tell the reader about your famous person’s life through a series of letters written over his/her lifespan from that person to a friend.
  43. 43. Category Swan Dive 20-18 points Freestyle 17-15 points Doggie Paddle 14-12 points Organization Carefully organized with varied transitions. Lead grabs reader’s attention. Conclusion works well. Details and paragraphs are flow logically. Has some transitions. Most parts of the portrait fit together. Most details and paragraphs flow logically. Few transitions used. Too many details are out of order. Idea Development Writer knows topic very well. Many interesting details. Significant events, contributions, and character traits are all included. Writer knows the topic. Most details fit and are interesting. Significant events, contributions, and character traits are included. Writer does not know enough about the topic. Needs more details Missing significant events, contributions, or character traits. Voice The portrait bears a clear imprint of the writer. The writer’s voice is lively and confident. The writer’s personality is evident in the essay. The writer does not project enough enthusiasm for the topic to come alive. Word Choice Writer uses a variety of strong words. Words create vivid pictures in reader’s mind. Writing has some strong words. Some words create pictures in the reader’s mind. Words do not show the writer’s meaning. Reader is confused by the writer’s choice of words Conventions Errors are so few and minor that they are easily overlooked. There are a few errors but meaning is not disrupted. Errors are serious enough to be distracting.
  44. 44. Think Dots – Vocabulary Review http://curry.virginia.edu/uploads/resourceLibrary/nagc_cubing__think_dots.pdf Connect It An automobile manufacturer wants to use this word as the name for its newest car. They have asked you to design the car– if this word were a car, what would it look like? Draw a picture. Define It What is this word’s definition? Explain what this word means in your own words. Use It Create a concrete poem using this word as the poem’s subject Collage It Create a collage of words and images which represents this word. Evaluate It In your opinion, is this word a “good” word or a “bad” word? In other words, is this word useful? Does it do a job that no other word can do? Personify It Give this word a personality– what do you think this word would be like if it were a person? Find another word from our list that you think would either be this word’s perfect match or worst enemy, and explain your rationale.
  45. 45. Just Remember… everyonegetting thesamething. everyonegetting what they need in order to be
  46. 46. Great Resources  http://ncaig.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/AIG+Booster+Shot+Series  www.birdseed.com  www.hoagiesgifted.org  www.2differentiate.pbworks.com  The Differentiator  Respondo!  Challenging Units for Gifted Students by Dr. Kenneth J. Smith and Susan Stonequist  (Two different books, one each for math and science)  Flip Book and Flip Book, Too by Dr. Sandra Kaplan
  47. 47. Your Turn Tic-Tac-Toe is a simple way to give students alternative ways of exploring and expressing key ideas and using key skills. Ideas of how to use:  Allow students to complete any 3 tasks--even if the completed tasks don't make a Tic-Tac- Toe.  Assign student tasks based on readiness.  Create different Tic-Tac-Toe boards based on readiness.  Create Tic-Tac-Toe boards based on learning styles or learning preferences.  Create Tic-Tac-Toe boards based on Multiple Intelligences.

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