Providing Students a Window to the Past!

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Do you want your students to leave your classroom with a deeper, longer lasting understanding of Social Studies? This session will enable you to develop your student’s critical thinking skills by immersing them in the inquiry process using primary source documents. Resources will be shared.

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Providing Students a Window to the Past!

  1. 1. Concept Based Lesson Plan: Grade 8 – Goldsboro February 7, 2014 Unit of Study: From the Mountains to the Sea Lesson Overview Lesson Title: Experiencing the Coastal Plain Region of North Carolina Learning Outcomes: (Describe what you want students to take away from this lesson)  Students will explore the mystery and legend of the disappearance of the lost colony.  Students will find locations on maps, and discuss the connection between piracy and Coastal geography.  Students will analyze historic maps, and compare them to modern maps.  Students will examine what life was like on a pirate ship, and learn how piracy both effected and was affected by the economic situation in the colonies and the geographic features of North Carolina.  Students will learn how artists create projects using inspiration from nature, and then students will create their own individual artwork.  Students will understand that coastal people have created folk art and work tools out of necessity using natural resources and inspiration from nature. Students will have the opportunity to make their own duck decoy.  Students will be introduced to cultural traditions associated with Coastal Plains residents, such as dialect, music and dance. Lesson Description The session will begin with all students standing in a circle. They will be provided with an inflatable globe and instructed to randomly toss it at one another. When they catch the globe they have to yell out one word that they associate with “North Carolina.” Next, they will count off and be dispersed at the various “history labs” that will be located throughout the room. The lab will be an artifact along with a worksheet with some guiding questions pertaining to the artifact. They will be told to view the artifact through the lens of a historian and will conclude the collaborative experience through the development of a guiding question that will drive their future inquiries. Finally, we will reconvene to reflect on: What if I were to have asked you to look at your artifact through the lens of a cultural anthropologist? Clarifying Objectives: 8.H.1.2 Summarize the literal meaning of historical documents in order to establish context 8.H.1.3 Use primary and secondary sources to interpret various historical perspectives 8.H.1.4 Use historical inquiry to evaluate the validity of sources used to construct historical narratives 8.H.3.1 Explain how migration and immigration contributed to the development of North Carolina and the United States from colonization to contemporary times 8.H.3.3 Explain how individuals and groups have influenced economic, political and social change in North Carolina and the United States 8.G.1.1 Explain how location and place have presented opportunities and challenges for the movement of people, goods, and ideas in North Carolina and the United States 8.G.1.2 Understand the human and physical characteristics of regions in North Carolina and the United States 8.G.1.3 Explain how human and environmental interaction affected quality of life and settlement patterns in North Carolina and the United States
  2. 2. 8.E.1.1 Explain how conflict, cooperation, and competition influenced periods of economic growth and decline 8.E.1.2 Use economic indicators to evaluate the growth and stability of the economy of North Carolina and the United States. 8.C.1.1 Explain how influences from Africa, Europe, and the Americas impacted North Carolina and the United States 8.C.1.2 Summarize the origin of beliefs, practices, and traditions that represent various groups within North Carolina and the United States 8.C.1.3 Summarize the contributions of particular groups to the development of North Carolina and the United States Approximate Time Needed: 85 minutes Generalizations and Guiding Questions (What Students Should Understand) Generalization: Migration and immigration help to shape the development of a state and nation by contributing new ideas, culture and a workforce.  What group helped the North Carolina settlers? (F)  What dangers do immigrants often encounter? (C)  How did the first immigrants to North Carolina survive? (F) Generalization: Individuals and groups motivated by economic, political, or social grievances can be powerful forces for societal change.  How is privateering different than privacy? (F)  How did pirates contribute to the settlement of coastal North Carolina? (F)  What motivated civilizations to want to migrate?(C) Generalization: The physical characteristics of a place may limit the mobility of people, goods and ideas.  What geographical features attract settlers? (C)  How did North Carolina’s coastal geography affect the settlement of the colony? (F)  What physical characteristics aided settlement patterns? (F)  How is fishing important commercially? (F) Generalization: Humans may modify the environment in a way that improve the quality of life through economic growth or environmental development that results in increased human comfort.  What physical conditions provided the greatest challenges for immigrants? (F)  Are foods and weapons a want or a need?(C) Generalization: Diverse cultures are valuable to the development of a society. (PT – see below)  Why has a legend been created about Virginia Dare? (F)  What makes a society “civilized”? (P)
  3. 3. Essential Content Knowledge and Skills Content Knowledge (what students should know) Skills (what students should be able to do)  Examples of historical documents and their associated events or issues.  The different types of information primary sources can provide.  The difference between a primary and a secondary source.  How to differentiate between the value of primary and secondary sources.  Examples of primary and secondary sources.  Appropriate questions to ask in order to interpret various historical perspectives  Historical inquiry is the research or investigation of past events.  Historical inquiry seeks to answer the provocative questions.  Reasons for migration within the United States and to and from North Carolina.  Changing demographics of North Carolina and the United States as a result of immigration to the United States and migration within the United States and North Carolina.  The beliefs, feelings and actions of individual people who affected change in North Carolina and the United States.  How groups were motivated to and have affected change in North Carolina and the United States.  How to describe the various regions of North Carolina and the United States in terms of physical environment.  The various types of regions.  The unifying characteristics that define a particular region in North Carolina and the United States.  How and why regions may change.  Specific examples of geographic, cultural, political, economic and ethnic regions.  Various ways North Carolinians have adapted to and modified the environment and the corresponding  Abstract a general theme or point of a historical document by articulating its word for word meaning.  Use different sources of information (both primary and secondary) from multiple perspectives to understand and interpret a particular event or issue.  Analyze various primary source documents  Formulate historical provocative and conceptual questions.  Gather data from a variety of sources (both primary and secondary).  Interpret data in a historical context.  Support interpretations with historical evidence.  Assess interpretations of history and determine how valuable each interpretation is to the reader.  Determine bias and perspective in a historical source.
  4. 4. outcomes of those adaptations and modifications.  Various ways in which nature has impacted the quality of life and settlement patterns in North Carolina and the United States.  How people competed for scarce resources, cooperated to achieve economic goals, or had conflicting view points over an economic issue.  How economic growth impacted selected groups.  Scenarios of growth and stability in North Carolina and the United States in relation to economic indicators.  How the cultural practices, values and belief systems of American Indians influenced the way of life of Africans and Europeans.  How the interaction of American Indians, Africans, and Europeans influenced each other.  Selected information about various groups’ culture.  Geographic regions and country origins of immigrants to North Carolina and the United States.  Examples of cultural diffusion present in North Carolina and the United States.  The cultural, political, and economic impact of various native and immigrant groups on North Carolina and the United States.  The specific contributions of various groups to the development of North Carolina and the United States.  The contributions of various demographic groups. Assessment Plan Learning Experiences Assessment Type Instructional Strategies Students will research Performance Task: Students will research the diverse cultures that came to live together in the coastal region in the 16th Century. Using a graphic organizer, students will record the contributions that each culture contributed to North Carolina development. Using this information, students will deliver an address to a fourth grade class explaining how Inquiry based instructional labs in which students study artifacts and primary source documents. Graphic Organizer This will guide the driving question(s) in order to support students throughout the inquiry process Public Speaking Prior to delivering the students address to the rest of the class, they will be provided with a rubric on effective public speaking strategies. Argumentative writing Students will have had experienced at least
  5. 5. North Carolina would be different today if it had not been for their cultures early contributions. one argumentative writing assignment prior to the assignment of this performance task in which they will have to have supported their argument with historical evidence (see rubric) Lesson Details and Procedures Learning Targets (should be derived from assessments)  I can assess the value of various types of sources  I can formulate driving questions  I can interpret historical events that are derived from multiple perspectives.  I can deliver an oral presentation  I can write an argumentative essay  I can complete a graphic organizer  I can determine bias in a historical source Anticipatory Set/Hook The session will begin with all students standing in a circle. They will be provided with an inflatable globe and instructed to randomly toss it at one another. When they catch the globe they have to yell out one word that they associate with “North Carolina.” Methods and Procedures (Teacher Input Guided Practice and Independent Practice) Next, they will count off and be dispersed at the various “history labs” that will be located throughout the room. The lab will be an artifact along with a worksheet with some guiding questions pertaining to the artifact. They will be told to view the artifact through the lens of a historian and will conclude the collaborative experience through the development of a guiding question that will drive their future inquiries. Stations: (Historian card at all stations except for Geographer card at Map station) 1. Marine life & Coastal Art Prints (Artifact Analysis Worksheet) 2. Historical and modern Maps (Map worksheet) 3. Pieces of 8 – coins, Ship’s Biscuit recipe and Pirate flags (with information cards) 4. Dugout Canoe & photos (Worksheet) 5. Duck Decoy & Shells (Artifact Analysis Worksheet) 6. Water color drawings of the Lost Colony & Article: “The Legend of the White Doe” (Corresponding Worksheet) Closing/Assessment Finally, we will reconvene to reflect on: What if I were to have asked you to look at your artifact through the lens of a cultural anthropologist? (Disperse Cultural Anthropologist Handouts) Accommodations for Differentiated Instruction Pending in- class IEPs Material/Resources Needed – Teacher Notes History in a Box: North Carolina History Museum Artifact Analysis Worksheet http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets/artifact_analysis_worksh eet.pdf This can serve as a first unit. Students would benefit from being exposed prior to this lesson.

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