Gtd and pomodoro

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A short introduction about two time management techniques : GTD (Getting Things Done) and Pomodoro Technique. Prepared by Naga Chokkanathan for CRMIT ( http://www.crmit.com/ )

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Gtd and pomodoro

  1. 1. GTD & Pomodoro Naga Chokkanathan January 2012Copyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  2. 2. Agenda Introduction GTD Pomodoro Resources Conclusion ReferencesCopyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  3. 3. Introduction • Time Management: One the hottest topics / issues of all time • More relevant today, with all the information overload / huge expectations / agile methodologies / quick results / decisions • How can we make best use of our time? • There are many techniques, we are introducing two of them in this session: – GTD & PomodoroCopyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  4. 4. GTD • GTD = Getting Things Done • Developed by David Allen in his book “Getting Things Done” • Main concepts: – Recording your tasks in a reliable way • using a system that you trust – This will free your mind from trying to remember and prioritize stuff – This recaptured mental energy can be put towards being more productive and efficientCopyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  5. 5. GTD (Contd) • 4 Steps – Collection (Various Sources) – Processing – Organization – Doing (Easiest part, Really!)Copyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  6. 6. GTD Processing • A Sample AlgorithmCopyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  7. 7. GTD Organizing • Each of your tasks will go to one of these places: – Trash – Reference – Someday – Project Planning – Waiting – Calendar – Task List • But, what if Task List becomes HUGE?Copyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  8. 8. Pomodoro Technique • Pomodoro = Tomato in italian • Technique introduced by Francesco CirilloCopyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  9. 9. Pomodoro Technique (Continued) • Steps – 1. Choose a task to be accomplished (from your task list) – 2. Set the timer to 25 Minutes (1 Pomodoro) – 3. Work on the task, when the the timer rings, STOP – 4. Take a short break (~5 Minutes) – 5. Go to step 2 • Very Large Tasks: For every 4 Pomodoros, take a long break • Very Small Tasks: Combine Smaller tasks to make 1 PomdoroCopyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  10. 10. Why 25 Minutes? • It depends on human attention span, may differ for individuals – 5 minutes is too little to focus on a task – 2 hours is too long (we get tired) – We need to decide on an optimal number, it may be 25 or 30 or 45 minutes for you (Customized Pomodoro!) • Should I really buy a tomato shaped timer? – Nope, no magic in tomato ☺ It works with any timer, But calling a task as ‘2 pomodoros worth’ is super cool ;)Copyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  11. 11. Resources • Usually a sheet of paper and a pencil is all you need to use GTD • Additionally, you would need a stop watch or timer for Pomodoro • But, if you insist on using a software for these: – GTD compatible Task Managers for PC / Phone • http://mashable.com/2009/01/29/getting-things-done/ – Pomodoro timers available in the market (physical and software) – Search for “GTD” or “Pomodoro” in your iTunes App Store / Android Market / Blackberry App WorldCopyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  12. 12. Conclusion • GTD and Pomodoro are wonderful techniques used by millions of people – But there is no assurance that they would work for you, at least not as it is (“Out of the box” ☺) – Usually, a combination of multiple techniques, which are personalized for you, will work for sure • Whichever technique you may use, constantly watch out and avoid these two things – Time wasting activities (There are too many, believe me!) – Overloaded mind / body (Means, a fine balance of Work / Relax is required)Copyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  13. 13. References • Books & Websites: – Getting Things Done By David Allen (Penguin, 2002) – The Pomodoro Technique By Frencesco Cirillo (Download for Free @ http://www.pomodorotechnique.com/book.html ) – http://www.toodledo.com/info/gtd.php – http://www.komarketingassociates.com/blog/organizing- projects-with-gtd-and-outlook-2007/ • Image Credits: – http://openclipart.org/detail/166670/clock-by-caig – http://openclipart.org/detail/154855/green-steps-by-netalloy – http://www.komarketingassociates.com/blog/wp- content/uploads/2007/11/gtd_chart.png – http://www.pomodorotechnique.com/ – http://blog.onlineclock.net/online-pomodoro-timers/Copyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information
  14. 14. Contact Information Email : contact@crmit.comCopyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved.This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it or assist in its implementation may beprepared, copied, published, and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this section are included on all suchcopies and derivative works. However, this document itself may not be modified in any way, including by removing the copyright notice or references to CRMIT, without thepermission of the copyright owners. This document and the information contained herein is provided on an "AS IS" basis and CRMIT DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES,EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY OWNERSHIPRIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.Copyright of CRMIT-© 2011. All rights reserved. Confidential Information

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