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Personal Planetoid We each get 4.4 acres Excluding the needs of the estimated 25 million other species
Footprints 4.4 Exists 6  Humans use 1 80% wild 0.75 Afghanistan 2 India 3 Global Living Project 4 China 6.25 Mexico 11.5 S...
We are alive at a unique time! Exponential Growth of Population and Consumerism IPAT
What will we do about it?
100 Year Plan 0.7 acres 9 Billion Two-child families 6 acres 1 Billion One-child families Footprint Goal with 80 % Wild Pr...
One New Idea <ul><li>On average, single child families for the next 100 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Average footprints worldw...
The primary factors that drive impact are in our control. (IPAT)  I mpact = P  x  A  x  T <ul><li>A – Affluence . How much...
Quantum Reductions
<ul><li>Sharing  – Two in car (1/2 footprint) </li></ul><ul><li>Caring  –Halve travel (1/4 footprint) </li></ul><ul><li>Co...
Zero Emission Vehicle
#2 Impact Item:   Housing (sq-ft. & embodied energy) 1/5 area/person X 1/5 impact/area = Factor 25 $1,500
Leveling foundation
First bale
Peeling rafters from the land
Alaska Mill – clear-cut free lumber
1 st  of 3 coats of adobe
Adobe –  clay, sand, lime and a pinch of concrete
Scavenger species in action
#3. Impact Item: Utilities One cord of Wood (R45 Walls)
Micro solar homestead – Vermont
Thermo-siphon solar hot water
A solar cooker or a UFO? Playing with renewables demystifies them.
 
 
Wood-fired cob bread oven
 
Hand washing clothes
#4 Impact Item: Diet Localvore Food Factor 25 Vegan 1/15 – 1/30 Local/Organic --¼ - ½ Organic -- ¼ -½ Veganic
WINTER Root Cellars Sprouting Grains Canned and Dried Syrup FALL Wild Edibles Garden Root Cellars Canning/Drying Fermentin...
Root cellar Stores vegetables for 6 months without energy
Rutabaga wrestling Sunday entertainment
Sometimes you just have too many carrots
Sprouting – live food all winter. Peas Lentils Alfalfa Fenugreek Sunflower seeds Mung beans Radish
 
Harvesting rye
The threshing floor
Winnowed winter rye
February’s Blueberries
Gathering wild foods
Wild Sandwich
<ul><li>Common Edible and Medicinal plants </li></ul><ul><li>Burdock -  Use first year roots as a  vegetable and second ye...
<ul><li>Milkweed -  Edible in all phases of its life cycle. Early shoots can be cooked like asparagus, the flowers can be ...
 
Barbequed road kill deer
Sandy likes it!
#5 Impact Item: General Consumerism <ul><li>Refuse </li></ul><ul><li>Rethink </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce </li></ul><ul><li>Re...
 
The Global Living Project Medicinal plant workshop Making tinctures
Sustainability Must Become the Default Option Easier And  Less Costly
Dartmouth College’s first Sustainability Coordinator
The Task: <ul><li>To embed principles of sustainability in all of Dartmouth's roles… </li></ul><ul><li>To make Dartmouth a...
IVY Sustainability Coordinators <ul><li>Brown University – Teichert, Kurt </li></ul><ul><li>Columbia –  Mesa,   Nilda </li...
Dartmouth’s CO2 Emissions
Cash Flow for implementing Carbon Neutrality at UCSB $1 Million/yr. Positive Cash Flow
<ul><li>Possible Solar Thermal Applications : </li></ul><ul><li>Make-up water for steam plant </li></ul><ul><li>Heating po...
Learning from Nature
 
 
Tending the inner fire
Sustainability asks us to look at the world differently.
Can we  take back some  Proxies?
Is it possible to meet some of our needs without Corporations and Oil?
But… How will we get around?
Who will  feed us?
How will we stay warm?
Where will the sweetness  for life come from?
In 1939 Gandhi concluded,   You cannot build non-violence on a factory civilization, but it can be built on self-contained...
The Winner? Most fun @ the smallest footprint.
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Jim Merkel: Radical Simplicity Part 2

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Jim Merkel of Dartmouth College on Simplicity

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Jim Merkel: Radical Simplicity Part 2

  1. 1. Personal Planetoid We each get 4.4 acres Excluding the needs of the estimated 25 million other species
  2. 2. Footprints 4.4 Exists 6 Humans use 1 80% wild 0.75 Afghanistan 2 India 3 Global Living Project 4 China 6.25 Mexico 11.5 Spain 13.5 UK 24 USA Footprint – acres Nation or group
  3. 3. We are alive at a unique time! Exponential Growth of Population and Consumerism IPAT
  4. 4. What will we do about it?
  5. 5. 100 Year Plan 0.7 acres 9 Billion Two-child families 6 acres 1 Billion One-child families Footprint Goal with 80 % Wild Projected Population in 2100  
  6. 6. One New Idea <ul><li>On average, single child families for the next 100 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Average footprints worldwide stable, but much better distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>In 100 years, 80 percent of Earth’s bioproductive space would be available for the estimated 25 million other species. </li></ul>
  7. 7. The primary factors that drive impact are in our control. (IPAT) I mpact = P x A x T <ul><li>A – Affluence . How much we consume. </li></ul><ul><li>P – Population . How many children we have. </li></ul><ul><li>T– Technology . How efficiently we employ tools. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Quantum Reductions
  9. 9. <ul><li>Sharing – Two in car (1/2 footprint) </li></ul><ul><li>Caring –Halve travel (1/4 footprint) </li></ul><ul><li>Conserving – 2 x the mpg (1/8 footprint) </li></ul><ul><li>More sharing – 4 in car (1/16) </li></ul><ul><li>Caring – Half travel again (1/32 ) </li></ul>Bike Commuter Car Commuter Bus Commuter #1 Impact Item: Transportation Factor 24
  10. 10. Zero Emission Vehicle
  11. 11. #2 Impact Item: Housing (sq-ft. & embodied energy) 1/5 area/person X 1/5 impact/area = Factor 25 $1,500
  12. 12. Leveling foundation
  13. 13. First bale
  14. 14. Peeling rafters from the land
  15. 15. Alaska Mill – clear-cut free lumber
  16. 16. 1 st of 3 coats of adobe
  17. 17. Adobe – clay, sand, lime and a pinch of concrete
  18. 18. Scavenger species in action
  19. 19. #3. Impact Item: Utilities One cord of Wood (R45 Walls)
  20. 20. Micro solar homestead – Vermont
  21. 21. Thermo-siphon solar hot water
  22. 22. A solar cooker or a UFO? Playing with renewables demystifies them.
  23. 25. Wood-fired cob bread oven
  24. 27. Hand washing clothes
  25. 28. #4 Impact Item: Diet Localvore Food Factor 25 Vegan 1/15 – 1/30 Local/Organic --¼ - ½ Organic -- ¼ -½ Veganic
  26. 29. WINTER Root Cellars Sprouting Grains Canned and Dried Syrup FALL Wild Edibles Garden Root Cellars Canning/Drying Fermenting SUMMER Wild Edibles Garden Canning/Drying SPRING Wild Edibles Root Cellars Purchasing (for Winter) Sprouting
  27. 30. Root cellar Stores vegetables for 6 months without energy
  28. 31. Rutabaga wrestling Sunday entertainment
  29. 32. Sometimes you just have too many carrots
  30. 33. Sprouting – live food all winter. Peas Lentils Alfalfa Fenugreek Sunflower seeds Mung beans Radish
  31. 35. Harvesting rye
  32. 36. The threshing floor
  33. 37. Winnowed winter rye
  34. 38. February’s Blueberries
  35. 39. Gathering wild foods
  36. 40. Wild Sandwich
  37. 41. <ul><li>Common Edible and Medicinal plants </li></ul><ul><li>Burdock - Use first year roots as a vegetable and second year roots medicinally. A powerful blood cleanser and overall tonic to the lymphatic system. </li></ul><ul><li>Chickweed - Delicious and nutritious. Cooling, helps to absorb nutrients, neutralizes toxins and dissolves cysts. </li></ul><ul><li>Dandelion - Helps to remove toxicants from the body through strengthening the liver. The delicious young leaves are packed with vitamins and minerals and the root is nice to eat in soup or stir-fry or roasted and used as a coffee substitute. </li></ul><ul><li>Fiddlehead ferns - Formally known as the ostrich fern, this delicious spring treat. I love to sauté the young, unfurling heads with garlic and olive oil. </li></ul><ul><li>Goldenrod - Fresh or dried leaves and flowers make a ice tea. Useful for dispelling flatulence and treating colds. </li></ul><ul><li>Jewelweed - Best known as an antidote for poison ivy, it is generally soothing to the skin. Young shoots can be boiled in two changes of water and eaten as a spring green. </li></ul><ul><li>Lambs Quarters - One of the most nutritious plants you can eat. Early, everywhere and delicious, lambs quarters will nourish you completely. Long live the weeds! </li></ul>
  38. 42. <ul><li>Milkweed - Edible in all phases of its life cycle. Early shoots can be cooked like asparagus, the flowers can be steamed or stir fried, and the seed pods can be boiled. When cooking young shoots and seed pods, cycle it through a few changes of water.. </li></ul><ul><li>Nettle - Overall one of the most nourishing plants out there. Gentle enough for everyday use, it strengthens and fortifies kidneys, adrenal glands, lungs, intestines and arteries. Also stimulates digestion, good for urinary tract. Nettle is especially good for women during pregnancy, childbirth and lactation. </li></ul><ul><li>Ox-eye Daisy - Very common, the leaves are a delicious addition to salads. </li></ul><ul><li>Plantain - The young leaves are tasty in an early spring salad. </li></ul><ul><li>Raspberry - A yummy tea can be made of the leaves - good support for women's reproductive systems. The root is helpful for digestive issues. The berries are not only delicious, but are also mildly laxative. </li></ul><ul><li>Red Clover - High in protein, the whole plant can be eaten, preferably cooked. The flowers make a lovely tea good for respiratory issues and stimulating to the liver and gall bladder. </li></ul><ul><li>Rose - The hips contain a lot of vitamin C - infuse in honey for optimal nutritive value. </li></ul><ul><li>Sorrels - Wood sorrel and sheep sorrel - both very common. The leaves are a nice, tangy addition to salads. </li></ul><ul><li>St. John’s Wort - Useful in treating nervous conditions such as insomnia. </li></ul><ul><li>Violet - The leaves are nourishing (two of them contain your daily dose of vitamin C) and are great in early spring salads. They help support digestion, the immune system, nerves, lungs and the reproductive system. </li></ul>
  39. 44. Barbequed road kill deer
  40. 45. Sandy likes it!
  41. 46. #5 Impact Item: General Consumerism <ul><li>Refuse </li></ul><ul><li>Rethink </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce </li></ul><ul><li>Reuse </li></ul><ul><li>Recycle </li></ul>
  42. 48. The Global Living Project Medicinal plant workshop Making tinctures
  43. 49. Sustainability Must Become the Default Option Easier And Less Costly
  44. 50. Dartmouth College’s first Sustainability Coordinator
  45. 51. The Task: <ul><li>To embed principles of sustainability in all of Dartmouth's roles… </li></ul><ul><li>To make Dartmouth a model of sustainability. </li></ul>
  46. 52. IVY Sustainability Coordinators <ul><li>Brown University – Teichert, Kurt </li></ul><ul><li>Columbia – Mesa, Nilda </li></ul><ul><li>Cornell – Koyanagi, Dean </li></ul><ul><li>Dartmouth – Merkel, James </li></ul><ul><li>Harvard – Sharp, Leith </li></ul><ul><li>Penn – Riley, David </li></ul><ul><li>Princeton – Weber, Shana </li></ul><ul><li>Yale -- Newman, Julie </li></ul>
  47. 53. Dartmouth’s CO2 Emissions
  48. 54. Cash Flow for implementing Carbon Neutrality at UCSB $1 Million/yr. Positive Cash Flow
  49. 55. <ul><li>Possible Solar Thermal Applications : </li></ul><ul><li>Make-up water for steam plant </li></ul><ul><li>Heating pools and hot water in the gym </li></ul><ul><li>Leased equipment with positive cash flow in one to two years. </li></ul>
  50. 56. Learning from Nature
  51. 59. Tending the inner fire
  52. 60. Sustainability asks us to look at the world differently.
  53. 61. Can we take back some Proxies?
  54. 62. Is it possible to meet some of our needs without Corporations and Oil?
  55. 63. But… How will we get around?
  56. 64. Who will feed us?
  57. 65. How will we stay warm?
  58. 66. Where will the sweetness for life come from?
  59. 67. In 1939 Gandhi concluded, You cannot build non-violence on a factory civilization, but it can be built on self-contained villages.
  60. 68. The Winner? Most fun @ the smallest footprint.

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