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Essay on Gilgamesh's Heroism
A hero is someone who tries the best to help everyone and will do everything in his or her power
to help out another person. The term hero means different things to different people. Today many
people believe that a hero is a person who can accomplish what others can not or a person who
puts themselves on the line for the other people. Men, women and children can all be heroes if they
truly feel in their hearts the need to help others in even the smallest ways. In our modern world
heroes are defined in so many ways. Anyone can be a hero, a best friend, a devoted mother/father, a
teacher, etc. On the other hand, in the older days, before laws and technology, heroes were the men
who fought against evil things, who rescue damsels in...show more content...
Ancient Sumerian culture valued the ideas of heroism. The epic shows their societal values of
heroism, knowledge and loyalty and their importance. One of these values is the act of having right
conduct to others or heroism. Gilgamesh, in the story, displays heroic actions by slaying the Bull of
Heaven, which was created to destroy him. Gilgamesh praises "who is the most glorious of heroes,
the most eminent among men"(table 1, column iii, 23) Actually, the epic protagonist is Gilgamesh,
he is the main character in the story. Gilgamesh is a character who is very self–confident. He feels
that he is superior to others, due to the fact that he is two–thirds god, and one–third man. This
arrogance leads to his being cruel at the beginning of the story. Gilgamesh is described as,
two–thirds of him divine, one–third human. He oppresses the weak ones. Also he does not let the
young woman to go to her mother, the girl to be warrior, the bride to the young groom (table 1,
column ii, l, 12–13, 27–28). Gilgamesh is a man with no equal, so he feels superior. However, Enkidu
is created to show Gilgamesh that he is not the only hero. .".. Create again in the image of
Gilgamesh and let this limitation be as quick in hearts and as strong in arm so that these counter
forces might first engage...and finally
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Gilgamesh Research Paper
The strongest super human that ever existed was Gilgamesh. With his half human and half god self,
trying to keep people safe from the outside but not from himself. His government is oppressive and
a dictatorship. At the time he was a historical king from Uruk in Babylonia about 2000 B.C
Enkidu a man sent by the gods to fight Gilgamesh. Was part of the animals and lived with them, in
the meadows. Contrarily, Gilgamesh wanted to have all women as part of his bride chamber. And
that's where Enkidu catches him. But after they meet, Gilgamesh suddenly changes his way. After
Enkidu dies by a supposed illness induced by gods. Gilgamesh's heart is shattered.
After all what happened Gilgamesh wanted to seek immortality. He went to a mountain
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Essay On Gilgamesh
There is debate to whether or not the 12th tablet of the Epic of Gilgamesh belongs to the original
story. Gilgamesh showcases many tropes that we see in classic epics and novels of heros. He was
a man without fear, without a challenge, and at the beginning of the story he is painted out to be
more of a villain than a hero. This was do to his unrest, he need someone who could challenge him;
this would allow him to go down the path path of a hero. Enkidu was created by the gods to challenge
Gilgamesh and push him. I feel after he meets Enkidu, he starts to consider his fame more and
channels his gifts towards accomplishing feats instead terrorizing his people. Although, this
development happens later in his life I feel Gilgamesh holds higher...show more content...
In Tablet 7 (60–62) they talk about the underworld as Enkidu is passing into the afterlife. Despite
that the text doesn't really strike fear into the reader about the underworld. He is turned into a
dove and is taken to a house where the gods of the the underworld and afterlife reside. Fame is
glorified more in the first 11 tablets. So if it was presented the way it was in the 12th tablet it
would take away from that aspect. If I tell you what I saw of the ways of the Netherworld, O sit
you down and weep!' (194). This line alone depicts the differences in viewpoints in the first 11
tablets when compared to the 12th tablet. Its depicting the netherworld as a hellish place and
brings to question is fame worth it. Enkidu tells Gilgamesh of the people he saw; the man who
battle, the one who is left to rot in the fields. Enkidu states that the first man his love ones weep and
the second man has found no rest in the netherworld (195). This tablet tackles what happens to these
men of honor and fame and shows that regardless of what you do in the the human world, the
netherworld is ruthless to all. I begs the question is eternal glory and fame worth it in
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Essay on Epic of Gilgamesh
Title:Gilgamesh Type:Epic Author: Anonymous Theme:The central idea of Gilgamesh was the
greed that he had to receive eternal life. Gilgamesh was a selfish person who was half god and
half man and wanted to keep his youth after seeing Enkidu die. Gilgamesh knew his destiny was
not to receive eternal life because he was half man. He decided to go against the odds to fight
against not having eternal life searching for the secret despite what the Gods told him.
Exposition:The story dates between 2500–1500 B.C. Gilgamesh ruled in Uruk, a city in ancient
Mesopotamia. Protagonist:The epic is centered on Gilgamesh because he is the main character and
ruler of Uruk who in the beginning is rude and arrogant and has a journey...show more content...
Crisis:Death is the crisis for Gilgamesh and the fact he is half man is preventing him from living
forever. He decides to ignore the advice given to the gods and goes on a quest to find the boatman
Utnapishtim for eternal life. Climax:Gilgamesh goes on his journey for everlasting life and find
the boat man Utnapishtim for everlasting life. First, Gilgamesh is challenged to stay awake for 6
days and 7 nights, but he fails at the task. Secondly, he tells Gilgamesh that a prickly plant has the
answer for his eternal life and if he is able to capture it he will hold in his hands the answer for his
youth. As Gilgamesh goes to cleanse him self, a serpent takes his plant and Gilgamesh is
saddened because this now means death is in his path. He decides to make plans to take the plant
to the elderly men to renew their youth which shows leadership as a king is suppose to be.
Resolution or Denouement: In the beginning of the epic Gilgamesh the people of Uruk saw
Gilgamesh as a lousy, obnoxious, arrogant ruler. After his journeys to find everlasting life his heart
began to soften and see a different perspective of life. It was revealed long after Gilgamesh's death
that he was actually considered a god. This helps explain his fear towards death. Gilgamesh wanted
to physically be a great warrior until the end of time opposed to just another historic memory.
Although it was not actually death he was afraid of,
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Analysis of the Epic of Gilgamesh Essay
Analysis of the Epic of Gilgamesh The epic of Gilgamesh is the earliest primary document
discovered in human history dating back to approximately 2,000 B.C.E. This document tells a
story of an ancient King Gilgamesh, ruler of Sumer in 2,700 B.C.E. who is created gloriously by
gods as one third man and two third god. In this epic, Gilgamesh begins his kingship as an
audacious and immature ruler. Exhausted from complaints, the gods send a wild man named Enkidu
to become civilized and assist Gilgamesh to mature into a righteous leader. However, Enkidus death
causes Gilgamesh to realize his fear of immortality and search for an escape from death. On his
journey, Gilgamesh learns that the gods will not grant his wish and that he must...show more
content...
The author is praising Gilgamesh's leadership by communicating his intellectual capabilities deserve
respect. This, shows that ancient Mesopotamians believed that part of a great ruler's value was
revealed in their advanced intellectual capacities. The epic reveals that ancient Mesopotamia
understood that the basis of a monarch's legitimacy relied on the respect he carried for not only the
beings whom he rules and those who rule over him, but also his knowledge. The epic gives insight
to the ways in which ancient Mesopotamians valued life. This becomes most obvious when Enkidu
reveals to Gilgamesh his nightmare of the dark and enslaving afterlife as he is dying (The Epic of
Gilgamesh, 2). This leaves Gilgamesh with extreme terror of death which provokes his desperate
attempts to escape it. Giving death fearful and dark characteristics communicates that the afterlife
is a harrowing experience and life is the individual's harmonious experience. This serves to
establish that ancient Mesopotamians sensed that life was something to be cherished and conceived
of in a positive light. In addition, Mesopotamian life views are also illustrated when Gilgamesh
must accept that he will not receive his requests for immortality from the gods (The Epic of
Gilgamesh, 2). This suggests Mesopotamian society believed wise men should be grateful for their
destiny and that he or she should not reach beyond what they are given. In doing so, this
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Gilgamesh: a Hero's Journey Essay
2/29/12 Gilgamesh the Hero Gilgamesh, written by David Ferry, illustrates a story about a man
who knows everything, but continues to try and learn more. Although Gilgamesh may be arrogant,
he still remains a great ruler and commander of Uruk. Throughout the book, the adventures of
Gilgamesh fit Joseph Campbell's idea of the hero's journey. After analyzing the pieces to the hero's
journey, Gilgamesh is proven to be a true hero because his journey parallels that of the hero's
journey described by Campbell. The latter part of this paper will prove Gilgamesh is a hero using
Campbell's model, by analyzing the pieces of the hero's journey: separation or departure, the
initiation, and the return. The first element of the hero's...show more content...
Crossing the threshold is the last component of separation or departure. Campbell explains this as
leaving a world you know and entering a world that is unknown. In the book, Gilgamesh and Enkidu
leave Uruk after visiting Rimat–Ninsun. "Then from the Seven–Bolt Gate the two departed,/hearing
the warnings and blessings of the city" (Ferry 20). As the two companions leave the city they
know so well and begin their journey into the land they are unfamiliar with, they cross their
threshold. Since all of the elements of separation or departure are met in the beginning of the story,
Gilgamesh continues to meet the criteria to be a hero. The second piece needed for a hero's
journey is initiation, which includes the roads of trials, the belly of the whale, meetings, attonement
with the father, and the ultimate boon. Gilgamesh's fight against Huwawa was one of many
challenges he had during his journey. "Then Gilgamesh was afraid, and Enkidu/was afraid, and
they entered into the Forest, afraid" (Ferry 26). Just as a hero would act, Gilgamesh didn't let his
fears get the best of him, but instead he entered the Forest to fight Huwawa. Another challenge
Gilgamesh faces later in the story is fighting the Twin Dragon Scorpion Beings. When he came to
the mountain and saw the monster, fear spread through his body, but he didn't let it stop him from
his goal. "Terror in the body of Gilgamesh/seized hold of him
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Essay On Gilgamesh Class
Each grade (whether middle school, high school, or college) should help you discover a new goal
for yourself. Some teachers will be there to assist you in taking new measures and pushing yourself
to higher limits and some won't. I, unfortunately, had a teacher who didn't. Her name was Mrs. Orr
and all we did in her class was read short stories such as Gilgamesh and Beowulf and write
worksheets on them.
I never truly understood the meaning of writing an essay. Well, that is, until I came to college. Right
away I was given a writing portfolio. Most people in the class knew what that meant but I didn't
and that made me feel as if I shouldn't be there. But I decided that I won't give up. I want to get
farther than anyone in my family. Which should be easier since no one in my family went to
college. I had plenty of problems in the beginning of the year because I was new to the idea of
living on my own and providing for myself. I wasn't familiar with all of the work that I had to do in
such a short time. Which made adjusting to college difficult...show more content...
Wessels class so far; narrative, diagnostic and reflective. The Narrative essay is where I contained
the most difficulty. We had to write about a significant thing that happened in our past. I'm not
fond of writing stories about my past since I had problems that occurred and every time I think
about my past it takes me back to place where even demons wouldn't want to be. The diagnostic
essay was suitable considering it was my first. We basically had to write about what rules should be
added to the code of conduct. It was actually the easiest of the three. Speaking of, the last essay we
had to do was the one I'm doing now. Reflective essay. This one was a reflection of how we were in
high school versus how we are now pertaining to English class and essays. I didn't have a lot to say
since (as I mentioned before) my high school teachers never had us to do any real
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Gilgamesh Essay
Topical Essay 1
The story of "Gilgamesh" depicts all of the heroic triumphs and heart–breaking pitfalls a heroic
narrative should depict to be able to relate to today's audience. However, "Gilgamesh" was once
considered a lost and forgotten piece of literature for thousands of years, so there is a tremendous
gap between the time it was created and the time it was translated into language that today's audience
can understand. That gap in history makes several aspects of the story of "Gilgamesh" strange and
unfamiliar because what we now know about ancient Middle Eastern cultures and languages is a lot
less than what we know about the cultures that prospered after ancient Middle Eastern cultures.
Much of the content in the story of...show more content...
However, the prostitute was depicted as a nurturer and a symbol of pleasure. The prostitute seduced
Enkidu and taught him how to function properly in human society. The prostitute also played a
major role in Enkidu and Gilgamesh becoming friends because she led Enkidu to Uruk, which
was the place Gilgamesh ruled. The way the story of "Gilgamesh" ended was a bit strange to me
as well because typical heroic narratives end in heroism and triumph. In the story of "Gilgamesh"
Gilgamesh doesn't reach his goal of attaining eternal life at the end, instead he fails miserably and
meets the inevitable fate of death. I expected him to overcome the tremendous odds that were
stacked against him and victoriously become immortal. Today's audience is used to the hero
overcoming what most consider impossible at the end of a story. Although I found the story of
"Gilgamesh" to be somewhat strange it contained several familiar elements that are prevalent in
many heroic tales from the past and present. One familiar element was what some people refer to as
the "under–dog" factor. Gilgamesh and Enkidu embarked upon the most grueling and epic journey of
their lives just to find the vicious giant named Humbaba. The way that Humbaba was described in
the story made you feel like there is no way possible he can be defeated. This makes the audience
want to side with the lesser opponents because you can relate
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Gilgamesh Research Paper
The Epic of Gilgamesh inspires you to ponder who is this "Gilgamesh," and why is he so called
"Epic?" The first few pages allows you to recap on how Gilgamesh is a remarkable person, "two
thirds of him god, one third human" (tablet I, page 1). This powerful statement allows the reader to
understand that you reading about a person who wants to be represented as being more god than
being a human. Initially you think Gilgamesh as a great leader with powerful moves that no other
can overcome. While you read longer and strengthen your impression about Gilgamesh you often
notice his opposite side reveal his inner beast. "His companions are kept on their feet by his contests,
the young men of Uruk he harries without warrant. Gilgamesh lets
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Lessons Learned From the Epic of Gilgamesh Essay
The Epic of Gilgamesh, a Mesopotamian epic poem with no known author, is the story of the brute
King of Uruk, Gilgamesh, who was two–thirds divine and one–third human, which teaches readers
the unstoppable force of death, the wrath of the gods, and also the power of friendship, which are
illustrated to readers through the characters journeys, and those encountered along the way. The
poem, which is divided into twelve tablets, starts off with Gilgamesh being a vicious tyrant, one
who "would leave no son to his father... no girl to her mother"(Gilgamesh 101), and as for newly
married couples "was to join with the girl that night"(Gilgamesh 109) transitions to by the end of the
story an entirely new man.
One of the main...show more content...
Gilgamesh then goes on a fifty–five line long rant, just absolutely trashing Ishtar for her advances.
Ishtar then runs to her father, who just so happens to be Anu, to request the Bull of Heaven to
kill Gilgamesh. At first, Anu says that she provoked the king to say such things, but when Ishtar
says she will raise the dead, the god agrees to her request. Yet again, Anu must show his wrath.
The Bull of Heaven is released onto Uruk, but together, Gilgamesh and Enkidu are able to defeat
it and save the city. Enkidu throws part of the bull's body at Ishtar, and Gilgamesh hangs its
massive horns in his bedroom, which of course only further angered Ishtar. After a night of
celebration, Enkidu has a dream in which the gods say that he must die. Another example of the
wrath of the gods, Enkidu falls ill and dies after twelve days. Hoping to discover how he himself
can avoid the fate of his comrade, Gilgamesh goes on a journey to find Utnapishtim, a man who
survived a great flood and was granted eternal life by the gods. When Gilgamesh finds him,
Utnapishtim tells him the story of the flood he experienced, which was sent from the gods for no
other reason than they were angry. In The Epic of Gilgamesh, the wrath of the gods is provoked for
many reasons, whether it is to teach a lesson, or the gods are simply angry. Either way, the wrath of
the gods is present in this poem.
Another theme that is also present in The Epic of Gilgamesh is the
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Epic of Gilgamesh Essay
The Epic of Gilgamesh is one of earliest known pieces of literature. Through years of storytelling
and translation, The Epic of Gilgamesh became a timeless classic. This story is believed to have
originated from Sumerian poems and legends about the king of Uruk, Gilgamesh. Throughout the
epic, many themes arose about women, love, and journeys and the one I would like to discuss is the
theme of death. Also, I will discuss if Gilgamesh accepts morality at the end of the story and the
development of Gilgamesh's character throughout the story. The story mainly focuses on the
character Gilgamesh and this wild man created by the gods, Enkidu in which Gilgamesh and Enkidu
later become good friends. Together they go upon quests to defeat...show more content...
But when Enkidu dies while fighting Humbaba, one can tell a change in Gilgamesh's character.
Since Enkidu was his close and only friend, it makes it more visible that everyone is mortal. One
may say that, by going into the forest and facing Humbaba, Gilgamesh makes a name for himself
and changes the views of the people in his city. The great accomplishment of killing Humbaba
makes him a better person because he protects his city and for his love of Enkidu and his people.
This is a considerable amount of change from the beginning of the story. There are no major
changes in the character of Gilgamesh until Enkidu enters the picture. Enkidu is the primary
reason for the ultimate changes in the personality and maturity of Gilgamesh. The main factor
contributing to the changes in Gilgamesh the love that develops with Enkidu. Enkidu is made to
make Gilgamesh more human. In the first paragraph of the book the gods are angry with
Gilgamesh and send down an equal of himself, they send down Enkidu. After becoming friends,
Gilgamesh changes because he has an equal to be with. From Cedar Forest, Gilgamesh is met by
Shamash, the Sun God, who tells him, "You will never find the life for which you are searching."
This upsets Gilgamesh because he has traveled so far for someone to tell him he cannot have what
he wants and is looking for. For there, Gilgamesh travels to see Siduri by the sea. Siduri will not let
Gilgamesh pass to through to see Utnapishtim, the only man with eternal
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Examples Of Gilgamesh As A Hero
Gilgamesh, in my opinion, would not be considered a "hero" because of his unscrupulous attitude
towards everyone he came in contact with besides Enkidu. He was ruthless, overbearing, and cold
hearted. But some view as if he was indeed a hero. In Roman and Greek literature it explains that the
qualities of a hero are born of royal birth, endures physical or emotional suffering, and performs
extraordinary feats. Gilgamesh possessed all of these. He was two thirds god and one third man. He
went on many adventures such as the defeat of Humbaba, Utnapishtim's flood, and facing the bull
sent down from the heavens. And lastly, he had to deal with the grief of Enkidu's death and face the
reality that he cannot live forever and the city he has disowned
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The Epic Of Gilgamesh Essay
Tonisia Tutt Professor Andre World Literature 1 October 11, 2015 The Epic of Gilgamesh does not
quite have a happy end. Truthfully, Gilgamesh is not successful in his mission. It is shortsighted and
deceived to expect that Gilgamesh, the saint, must be effective in his journey to hold the
characteristics of courage. An unsuccessful journey not harsh any more than a courageous ending is
essentially joyful. For recognitions of this, we need to look no more distant than the plenty of
thoughtful legends of great writing – the stories of Homer, Virgil 's Aeneid, and even Beowulf of the
Anglo–Saxon abstract convention. The Illiad end with the slaughter of Troy and the passing of
Achilles. The Odyssey, in spite of the fact that it sees the saint restored home, in any case includes
an entirely tough cost. The Aeneid, in like manner, shows in disaster. Like Achilles, Odysseus,
Aeneas, and various other exemplary legends, Gilgamesh too shows those qualities vital to an
ordinary scholarly saint, none of which needs to do, truth be told, with the unique idea of pleasure.
In spite of the fact that achievement is quite unimportant to the bravery of a specific journey, maybe
the first indicate considered in "Gilgamesh" is that the legend might really make progress. His level
of progress depends to a limited extent on what he needs to accomplish and what he accomplish.
Given the included creative component of the epic that they are developments of one or more
creators the accomplishment
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Gilgamesh And The Epic Of Gilgamesh
The maturation of Gilgamesh and his desire to acquire wisdom throughout his journey is quite
apparent. By overcoming difficulties such as upholding Uruk, becoming friends with Enkidu, and
various other scenarios, Gilgamesh proves that he did in fact grow up throughout the epic. As the
epic starts, Gilgamesh is portrayed as a self–centered, self–admiring leader who believes that he is
the only individual that can lead the city of Uruk. Gilgamesh believes that he is a god–like figure
and often refers to himself as one. He believes that he is above everyone else in the city of Uruk. For
example, in the epic there is a scene where Gilgamesh enters the city of Uruk, the epic describes the
scene as; "He entered the city of Uruk–the–Town–Square, and a crowd gathered around. He came to
a halt in the street of Uruk–the Town–Square, all gathered about, the people discussed him" (15).
This quote is a good example of how Gilgamesh expected those around him to respect and look up to
him as a god–like figure. He did not lead the city of Uruk humbly; he wasn't a leader who strived to
feel like a normal citizen of the city. Instead, Gilgamesh felt that he was entitled to more privileges
than the average person. Early on in the epic, Gilgamesh is described as a "tall, magnificent and
terrible, who opened passes in the mountains, who dug wells on the slopes of the uplands, and
crosses the ocean, the wide sea to the sunrise" (2). This demonstrates how selfish Gilgamesh truly
was, and how all
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Essay On Gilgamesh Hero's Journey
Austin KayatinFormal Assignment #2
Classical and Biblical literatureFebruary 16, 2016
Is Gilgamesh a hero? Or is he a man on a wrongful crusade which is consuming him entirely? We
can begin to look at the outline Campbell has created for hero's and reference it to Gilgamesh's
journey. There are several paths a hero must take before his/her journey is over. The first step to a
hero's journey is "The call to adventure". This is the departure stage of the hero's journey in which
they are uncovering a world not yet discovered and a force not yet understood. Gilgameshs
departure began with the loss of his friend, Enkidu. Gilgamesh, the king who was described as part
god, and part man abandoned his kingdom in search for Utnapishtim. He hoped that...show more
content...
It is there were he convinced the guards to allow him through the entrance in which mortals cannot
venture. The one scorpion told Gilgamesh that only gods dare to enter through the gates but the
other scorpion acknowledged that two–thirds of Gilgamesh is god, so he was allowed to pass.
Gilgamesh's next step in the heros outline is called the "road of trials". This is where the hero must
survive a succession of trials and use everything he/she has learned leading up to this point.
Gilgamesh has met Utnapishtim and has learned the story of the flood. He is consumed with so
much grief and his private agenda of immortality that he ignores what everyone has been telling
him. He insisted to Utnapishtim that he wants to be immortal, so he is given a test to stay awake for
seven days which he ultimately fails, like Utnapishtim knew he would. Gilgamesh requested
Utnapishtim for an item to show to his people of Uruk. He is told to retrieve a plant from the bottom
of the sea that will make him young again if he eats it. On Gilgamesh's trip back home, a serpent
steals the magical plant. Gilgamesh ignored the advice everyone
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Essay On Gilgamesh And Fear Of Death
In The Epic, Gilgamesh's understanding of his mortality is almost dismissive; he argues that since
all men die anyway, that then they might as well risk their lives to make a name for themselves.
Gilgamesh does not question the value of "making a name for himself" in a world where all great
heroes are forgotten–it is enough to use his allotted years to achieve fame and glory. In this case,
Gilgamesh believes that the value of life is to be remembered after death. Gilgamesh's mortality and
fear of death reflect on his human side and is consistent with the human condition of fearing death.
However, Enkidu views death differently. Gilgamesh rouses Enkidu with a speech, explaining to him
that since all men die anyway, they should not fear...show more content...
Enkidu is a vital part of Gilgamesh's life. At the beginning of the story, Enkidu embodies the
opposite of Gilgamesh, his other half. After Enkidu's death Gilgamesh cannot go back to live as it
was, he is lost and for the first time in his life, afraid. The fate of all humankind, death, becomes the
last obstacle for Gilgamesh to conquer. When he learned of Utnapishtim– the immortal
human–Gilgamesh determined to be immortal as well and now has some proof that it is possible.
However, if living forever were possible than The Epic would not have a point. As Utnapishtim and
Siduri tell Gilgamesh death is inevitable. Thus life should be valued. To look forimmortality is a
waste of life and the gift of life should be appreciated because it has an end. Gilgamesh then wishes
to give the flower of immortality to the city of Uruk and return it to its glory. This change of heart in
Gilgamesh is nothing the reader would have expected at the beginning of the poem, as the poem
begins with descriptions of Gilgamesh's selfish characteristics. This setup allows us to now view the
distinct change in Gilgamesh and that Gilgamesh see's what immortality is. By restoring the city, he
is making not only his but Enkidu's memory immortal.
Gilgamesh, a figure of celestial stature, allows his mortal side to whittle away his power after the
death of Enkidu. Undeniably, defenseless before the validity of his end, he leaves Uruk and begins a
quest for
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Essay on The Epic of Gilgamesh
In the ancient Mesopotamian world, the realm of civilization was viewed to be highly illustrious. At
the same time, this state of advancement of great antiquity was also an attribute of divinity. The
elements of civilization were intimately associated to the highly esteemed divine mediation. Despite
the prominent theology culture in The Epic of Gilgamesh, divine intervention is not the only element
that could transform the crude heroic figures into sagacious men. Strength and power are definitely
not the only possessions that could advance one in life even though they clearly distinguish the
heroes from ordinary men. It is rather, more significantly, the process of internalization. No
civilization emerges directly and independently – it is...show more content...
Even though the King of Uruk is expected to be highly civilized, ironically he does not appear to be
so. Overwhelmed with ego, arrogance and complete misuse of power, Gilgamesh has condemned
civilization insofar his existence. He thwarts his humanity by emphasizing his strength and power in
order to be more successful, forsaking the well–being of his people. Hearing the laments and cries of
the people of Uruk, the gods then create Enkidu as a match for Gilgamesh. For Enkidu is a divine
creation, with "[a] virtue in him like the god of war Ninurta, long waved hair of the goddess of
corn Nisaba, and body of matted hair like the god of cattle Samuqan" (Sandars 63), one would
have expected him to be a lesson to Gilgamesh. However, the creation of Enkidu does not really
answer the people's grieving as an equal who can contend with Gilgamesh together and keep him
busy from all his iniquities (Sandars 62). Enkidu can never be Gilgamesh's match as he is created
completely human while Gilgamesh two third divine.
This strategy, in fact, works in a different manner whereby Enkidu teaches Gilgamesh the real
significance of being a human. This shows a fascinating twist as Gilgamesh's intention to "tame"
Enkidu by sending him a prostitute instead mirrors his taming by Enkidu. It is because Enkidu's
indulgence in sex with the prostitute "for six days and seven nights" that
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Essay On The Epic Of Gilgamesh
"The Epic of Gilgamesh" is a quest narrative that describes King Gilgamesh's journey and his
search for immortality. This epic is considered to be the most remarkable work of ancient
Mesopotamia, and one of the world's first pieces of literature (54). There is no specific author to
take credit for this incredible work. It is said to have developed progressively over a prolonged
span of a millennium. The epic made its first appearance during 2100 B.C.E in a series of poems
written in the earliest Mesopotamian language, Sumerian (54). It was engraved into stone, one of the
earliest forms of writing also known as "cuneiform". During the war, the tablets on which the epic
was written disappeared under rubble. Later, they were rediscovered during the nineteenth century.
Gilgamesh's epic explores what it means to be human, and how immortality can be achieved even
after death.
King Gilgamesh is on an important quest to achieve ultimate power beyond humanity. He is willing
to travel to the depths of Earth just to reach it. Along his journey, he meets interesting characters,
encounters several setbacks, and learns valuable lessons. The epic can be seen as a path that leads
humans to maturity and...show more content...
Goddess Ishtar was an obstacle that hindered him from reaching his destination. She persuaded her
father to send down a bull from heaven as a means of punishment for Gilgamesh's disrespect
(Karahashi and Lopez–Ruiz, 2006). Nonetheless, Gilgamesh meets Utnapishtim, in other words "He
Who Saw Life". He was the former king of Shurrupak that served great benefit to Gilgamesh. He had
the concoction Gilgamesh craved to taste, immortality; therefore, Gilgamesh sought for his
assistance. However, little did Gilgamesh know that what Utnapishtim had in store was something
much more valuable than eternal life
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Essay on Gilgamesh
Gilgamesh
Death in ancient Mesopotamia was something to be dreaded. Nowhere is there mentioned an
afterlife condition comparable to our ideas of heaven. Their netherworld, endured by all, must
have been the prototype of our idea of hell. It's a place wherein souls "are bereft of light, clay their
food" and "dirt is their drink." They are ruled over by the harrowing figure of Ereshkigal, forever
rending her clothes and clawing her flesh in mourning over her endless miscarriages. These
unpleasant descriptions are a natural reaction to the experience of burial, being trapped within the
earth where no light can reach and nothing can grow. In Gilgamesh, Enkidu bewails his fate "to sit
with the ghosts of the dead." This envokes...show more content...
The wings are a mockery of their condition. They, who in life surely looked enviously upon the
birds in the sky, have in death been given wings, and have nowhere to fly to. Today we speak of
angels, up in heaven, getting their wings, but the imagery here is better suited to Dante's Inferno.
Dirt for water, clay for food. Sounds pretty dismal, but there may be reason to believe you wouldn't
want the food down there. Those who are sent on an errand to the netherworld are cautioned not to
partake of any water or food offerred them. In Inanna's Descent Enki fashions an elegist and
myrmidon out of the dirt beneath his fingernails, appropriately for their task is to the netherworld.
Enki warns these two that, "They will offer you the river at its high water, may you not except it.
They will offer you the field when in grain, may you not except it." Perhaps by refusing the water
and grain they are mimicking death? More likely, the food and water of the netherworld are
poisonous to mankind. When Inanna is subdued in Inanna's Descent, she is transformed into a "slab
of tainted meat." Important here is the reference to butchering. Inanna is not just reduced to a rotting
corpse, but a slab of meat as it would have been portioned off for human
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Epic of Gilgamesh Essay examples
Good King, Bad Kind
Gilgamesh existed as one of the oldest known Sumerian rulers of all time and is accredited to many
accomplishments. Legend has it that he created the first Sumerian civilization, constructing a city
with many elaborate temples and immense walls. However, he has also been characterized as one of
the cruelest and most self–centered rulers of all. Throughout the course of Gilgamesh's life he goes
from being a womanizing, slave driving ruler to a negligent and stubborn king, who not even
god–sent Enkidu could help transform into a better king.
At first, Gilgamesh is a controlling and arrogant king, who thinks only of himself. He constantly
works the men, building enormous walls surrounding the...show more content...
The two immediately become companions because Gilgamesh finally finds his match. They set off
on an adventure to destroy the cedar forest and its guardian, Humbaba, all to be forever
remembered. Gilgamesh appears to be improving his ways and not exasperating his people.
However, Gilgamesh then takes his journey to be remembered one step too far and kills the bull
of heaven. This infuriates the gods so greatly that they decide that one out of Gilgamesh and
Enkidu must pay for their actions. The gods therefore bestow a deadly illness upon Enkidu, which
brings about his death. Enkidu's death devastates Gilgamesh, for he not only loses his best friend,
but also comes to the realization that he soon too will die. Not only does Gilgamesh lose his best
friend, but he also comes to the realization that he will also die some day. Thus, Gilgamesh decides
to seek out immortality so he will not have to endure death.
Gilgamesh sets out on his journey for immortality, leaving his kingdom and people behind to fend
for themselves. He starts to become self–seeking just as he had before. He spends every waking
moment searching for immortality only to benefit himself. The whole purpose of the journey itself
is so that Gilgamesh can gain immortality for himself and be remembered forever. He doesn't realize
that his people are off on there own with no king to control the empire. Even when
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Essay On Gilgamesh

  • 1. Essay on Gilgamesh's Heroism A hero is someone who tries the best to help everyone and will do everything in his or her power to help out another person. The term hero means different things to different people. Today many people believe that a hero is a person who can accomplish what others can not or a person who puts themselves on the line for the other people. Men, women and children can all be heroes if they truly feel in their hearts the need to help others in even the smallest ways. In our modern world heroes are defined in so many ways. Anyone can be a hero, a best friend, a devoted mother/father, a teacher, etc. On the other hand, in the older days, before laws and technology, heroes were the men who fought against evil things, who rescue damsels in...show more content... Ancient Sumerian culture valued the ideas of heroism. The epic shows their societal values of heroism, knowledge and loyalty and their importance. One of these values is the act of having right conduct to others or heroism. Gilgamesh, in the story, displays heroic actions by slaying the Bull of Heaven, which was created to destroy him. Gilgamesh praises "who is the most glorious of heroes, the most eminent among men"(table 1, column iii, 23) Actually, the epic protagonist is Gilgamesh, he is the main character in the story. Gilgamesh is a character who is very self–confident. He feels that he is superior to others, due to the fact that he is two–thirds god, and one–third man. This arrogance leads to his being cruel at the beginning of the story. Gilgamesh is described as, two–thirds of him divine, one–third human. He oppresses the weak ones. Also he does not let the young woman to go to her mother, the girl to be warrior, the bride to the young groom (table 1, column ii, l, 12–13, 27–28). Gilgamesh is a man with no equal, so he feels superior. However, Enkidu is created to show Gilgamesh that he is not the only hero. .".. Create again in the image of Gilgamesh and let this limitation be as quick in hearts and as strong in arm so that these counter forces might first engage...and finally Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 2. Gilgamesh Research Paper The strongest super human that ever existed was Gilgamesh. With his half human and half god self, trying to keep people safe from the outside but not from himself. His government is oppressive and a dictatorship. At the time he was a historical king from Uruk in Babylonia about 2000 B.C Enkidu a man sent by the gods to fight Gilgamesh. Was part of the animals and lived with them, in the meadows. Contrarily, Gilgamesh wanted to have all women as part of his bride chamber. And that's where Enkidu catches him. But after they meet, Gilgamesh suddenly changes his way. After Enkidu dies by a supposed illness induced by gods. Gilgamesh's heart is shattered. After all what happened Gilgamesh wanted to seek immortality. He went to a mountain Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 3. Essay On Gilgamesh There is debate to whether or not the 12th tablet of the Epic of Gilgamesh belongs to the original story. Gilgamesh showcases many tropes that we see in classic epics and novels of heros. He was a man without fear, without a challenge, and at the beginning of the story he is painted out to be more of a villain than a hero. This was do to his unrest, he need someone who could challenge him; this would allow him to go down the path path of a hero. Enkidu was created by the gods to challenge Gilgamesh and push him. I feel after he meets Enkidu, he starts to consider his fame more and channels his gifts towards accomplishing feats instead terrorizing his people. Although, this development happens later in his life I feel Gilgamesh holds higher...show more content... In Tablet 7 (60–62) they talk about the underworld as Enkidu is passing into the afterlife. Despite that the text doesn't really strike fear into the reader about the underworld. He is turned into a dove and is taken to a house where the gods of the the underworld and afterlife reside. Fame is glorified more in the first 11 tablets. So if it was presented the way it was in the 12th tablet it would take away from that aspect. If I tell you what I saw of the ways of the Netherworld, O sit you down and weep!' (194). This line alone depicts the differences in viewpoints in the first 11 tablets when compared to the 12th tablet. Its depicting the netherworld as a hellish place and brings to question is fame worth it. Enkidu tells Gilgamesh of the people he saw; the man who battle, the one who is left to rot in the fields. Enkidu states that the first man his love ones weep and the second man has found no rest in the netherworld (195). This tablet tackles what happens to these men of honor and fame and shows that regardless of what you do in the the human world, the netherworld is ruthless to all. I begs the question is eternal glory and fame worth it in Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 4. Essay on Epic of Gilgamesh Title:Gilgamesh Type:Epic Author: Anonymous Theme:The central idea of Gilgamesh was the greed that he had to receive eternal life. Gilgamesh was a selfish person who was half god and half man and wanted to keep his youth after seeing Enkidu die. Gilgamesh knew his destiny was not to receive eternal life because he was half man. He decided to go against the odds to fight against not having eternal life searching for the secret despite what the Gods told him. Exposition:The story dates between 2500–1500 B.C. Gilgamesh ruled in Uruk, a city in ancient Mesopotamia. Protagonist:The epic is centered on Gilgamesh because he is the main character and ruler of Uruk who in the beginning is rude and arrogant and has a journey...show more content... Crisis:Death is the crisis for Gilgamesh and the fact he is half man is preventing him from living forever. He decides to ignore the advice given to the gods and goes on a quest to find the boatman Utnapishtim for eternal life. Climax:Gilgamesh goes on his journey for everlasting life and find the boat man Utnapishtim for everlasting life. First, Gilgamesh is challenged to stay awake for 6 days and 7 nights, but he fails at the task. Secondly, he tells Gilgamesh that a prickly plant has the answer for his eternal life and if he is able to capture it he will hold in his hands the answer for his youth. As Gilgamesh goes to cleanse him self, a serpent takes his plant and Gilgamesh is saddened because this now means death is in his path. He decides to make plans to take the plant to the elderly men to renew their youth which shows leadership as a king is suppose to be. Resolution or Denouement: In the beginning of the epic Gilgamesh the people of Uruk saw Gilgamesh as a lousy, obnoxious, arrogant ruler. After his journeys to find everlasting life his heart began to soften and see a different perspective of life. It was revealed long after Gilgamesh's death that he was actually considered a god. This helps explain his fear towards death. Gilgamesh wanted to physically be a great warrior until the end of time opposed to just another historic memory. Although it was not actually death he was afraid of, Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 5. Analysis of the Epic of Gilgamesh Essay Analysis of the Epic of Gilgamesh The epic of Gilgamesh is the earliest primary document discovered in human history dating back to approximately 2,000 B.C.E. This document tells a story of an ancient King Gilgamesh, ruler of Sumer in 2,700 B.C.E. who is created gloriously by gods as one third man and two third god. In this epic, Gilgamesh begins his kingship as an audacious and immature ruler. Exhausted from complaints, the gods send a wild man named Enkidu to become civilized and assist Gilgamesh to mature into a righteous leader. However, Enkidus death causes Gilgamesh to realize his fear of immortality and search for an escape from death. On his journey, Gilgamesh learns that the gods will not grant his wish and that he must...show more content... The author is praising Gilgamesh's leadership by communicating his intellectual capabilities deserve respect. This, shows that ancient Mesopotamians believed that part of a great ruler's value was revealed in their advanced intellectual capacities. The epic reveals that ancient Mesopotamia understood that the basis of a monarch's legitimacy relied on the respect he carried for not only the beings whom he rules and those who rule over him, but also his knowledge. The epic gives insight to the ways in which ancient Mesopotamians valued life. This becomes most obvious when Enkidu reveals to Gilgamesh his nightmare of the dark and enslaving afterlife as he is dying (The Epic of Gilgamesh, 2). This leaves Gilgamesh with extreme terror of death which provokes his desperate attempts to escape it. Giving death fearful and dark characteristics communicates that the afterlife is a harrowing experience and life is the individual's harmonious experience. This serves to establish that ancient Mesopotamians sensed that life was something to be cherished and conceived of in a positive light. In addition, Mesopotamian life views are also illustrated when Gilgamesh must accept that he will not receive his requests for immortality from the gods (The Epic of Gilgamesh, 2). This suggests Mesopotamian society believed wise men should be grateful for their destiny and that he or she should not reach beyond what they are given. In doing so, this Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 6. Gilgamesh: a Hero's Journey Essay 2/29/12 Gilgamesh the Hero Gilgamesh, written by David Ferry, illustrates a story about a man who knows everything, but continues to try and learn more. Although Gilgamesh may be arrogant, he still remains a great ruler and commander of Uruk. Throughout the book, the adventures of Gilgamesh fit Joseph Campbell's idea of the hero's journey. After analyzing the pieces to the hero's journey, Gilgamesh is proven to be a true hero because his journey parallels that of the hero's journey described by Campbell. The latter part of this paper will prove Gilgamesh is a hero using Campbell's model, by analyzing the pieces of the hero's journey: separation or departure, the initiation, and the return. The first element of the hero's...show more content... Crossing the threshold is the last component of separation or departure. Campbell explains this as leaving a world you know and entering a world that is unknown. In the book, Gilgamesh and Enkidu leave Uruk after visiting Rimat–Ninsun. "Then from the Seven–Bolt Gate the two departed,/hearing the warnings and blessings of the city" (Ferry 20). As the two companions leave the city they know so well and begin their journey into the land they are unfamiliar with, they cross their threshold. Since all of the elements of separation or departure are met in the beginning of the story, Gilgamesh continues to meet the criteria to be a hero. The second piece needed for a hero's journey is initiation, which includes the roads of trials, the belly of the whale, meetings, attonement with the father, and the ultimate boon. Gilgamesh's fight against Huwawa was one of many challenges he had during his journey. "Then Gilgamesh was afraid, and Enkidu/was afraid, and they entered into the Forest, afraid" (Ferry 26). Just as a hero would act, Gilgamesh didn't let his fears get the best of him, but instead he entered the Forest to fight Huwawa. Another challenge Gilgamesh faces later in the story is fighting the Twin Dragon Scorpion Beings. When he came to the mountain and saw the monster, fear spread through his body, but he didn't let it stop him from his goal. "Terror in the body of Gilgamesh/seized hold of him Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 7. Essay On Gilgamesh Class Each grade (whether middle school, high school, or college) should help you discover a new goal for yourself. Some teachers will be there to assist you in taking new measures and pushing yourself to higher limits and some won't. I, unfortunately, had a teacher who didn't. Her name was Mrs. Orr and all we did in her class was read short stories such as Gilgamesh and Beowulf and write worksheets on them. I never truly understood the meaning of writing an essay. Well, that is, until I came to college. Right away I was given a writing portfolio. Most people in the class knew what that meant but I didn't and that made me feel as if I shouldn't be there. But I decided that I won't give up. I want to get farther than anyone in my family. Which should be easier since no one in my family went to college. I had plenty of problems in the beginning of the year because I was new to the idea of living on my own and providing for myself. I wasn't familiar with all of the work that I had to do in such a short time. Which made adjusting to college difficult...show more content... Wessels class so far; narrative, diagnostic and reflective. The Narrative essay is where I contained the most difficulty. We had to write about a significant thing that happened in our past. I'm not fond of writing stories about my past since I had problems that occurred and every time I think about my past it takes me back to place where even demons wouldn't want to be. The diagnostic essay was suitable considering it was my first. We basically had to write about what rules should be added to the code of conduct. It was actually the easiest of the three. Speaking of, the last essay we had to do was the one I'm doing now. Reflective essay. This one was a reflection of how we were in high school versus how we are now pertaining to English class and essays. I didn't have a lot to say since (as I mentioned before) my high school teachers never had us to do any real Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 8. Gilgamesh Essay Topical Essay 1 The story of "Gilgamesh" depicts all of the heroic triumphs and heart–breaking pitfalls a heroic narrative should depict to be able to relate to today's audience. However, "Gilgamesh" was once considered a lost and forgotten piece of literature for thousands of years, so there is a tremendous gap between the time it was created and the time it was translated into language that today's audience can understand. That gap in history makes several aspects of the story of "Gilgamesh" strange and unfamiliar because what we now know about ancient Middle Eastern cultures and languages is a lot less than what we know about the cultures that prospered after ancient Middle Eastern cultures. Much of the content in the story of...show more content... However, the prostitute was depicted as a nurturer and a symbol of pleasure. The prostitute seduced Enkidu and taught him how to function properly in human society. The prostitute also played a major role in Enkidu and Gilgamesh becoming friends because she led Enkidu to Uruk, which was the place Gilgamesh ruled. The way the story of "Gilgamesh" ended was a bit strange to me as well because typical heroic narratives end in heroism and triumph. In the story of "Gilgamesh" Gilgamesh doesn't reach his goal of attaining eternal life at the end, instead he fails miserably and meets the inevitable fate of death. I expected him to overcome the tremendous odds that were stacked against him and victoriously become immortal. Today's audience is used to the hero overcoming what most consider impossible at the end of a story. Although I found the story of "Gilgamesh" to be somewhat strange it contained several familiar elements that are prevalent in many heroic tales from the past and present. One familiar element was what some people refer to as the "under–dog" factor. Gilgamesh and Enkidu embarked upon the most grueling and epic journey of their lives just to find the vicious giant named Humbaba. The way that Humbaba was described in the story made you feel like there is no way possible he can be defeated. This makes the audience want to side with the lesser opponents because you can relate Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 9. Gilgamesh Research Paper The Epic of Gilgamesh inspires you to ponder who is this "Gilgamesh," and why is he so called "Epic?" The first few pages allows you to recap on how Gilgamesh is a remarkable person, "two thirds of him god, one third human" (tablet I, page 1). This powerful statement allows the reader to understand that you reading about a person who wants to be represented as being more god than being a human. Initially you think Gilgamesh as a great leader with powerful moves that no other can overcome. While you read longer and strengthen your impression about Gilgamesh you often notice his opposite side reveal his inner beast. "His companions are kept on their feet by his contests, the young men of Uruk he harries without warrant. Gilgamesh lets Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 10. Lessons Learned From the Epic of Gilgamesh Essay The Epic of Gilgamesh, a Mesopotamian epic poem with no known author, is the story of the brute King of Uruk, Gilgamesh, who was two–thirds divine and one–third human, which teaches readers the unstoppable force of death, the wrath of the gods, and also the power of friendship, which are illustrated to readers through the characters journeys, and those encountered along the way. The poem, which is divided into twelve tablets, starts off with Gilgamesh being a vicious tyrant, one who "would leave no son to his father... no girl to her mother"(Gilgamesh 101), and as for newly married couples "was to join with the girl that night"(Gilgamesh 109) transitions to by the end of the story an entirely new man. One of the main...show more content... Gilgamesh then goes on a fifty–five line long rant, just absolutely trashing Ishtar for her advances. Ishtar then runs to her father, who just so happens to be Anu, to request the Bull of Heaven to kill Gilgamesh. At first, Anu says that she provoked the king to say such things, but when Ishtar says she will raise the dead, the god agrees to her request. Yet again, Anu must show his wrath. The Bull of Heaven is released onto Uruk, but together, Gilgamesh and Enkidu are able to defeat it and save the city. Enkidu throws part of the bull's body at Ishtar, and Gilgamesh hangs its massive horns in his bedroom, which of course only further angered Ishtar. After a night of celebration, Enkidu has a dream in which the gods say that he must die. Another example of the wrath of the gods, Enkidu falls ill and dies after twelve days. Hoping to discover how he himself can avoid the fate of his comrade, Gilgamesh goes on a journey to find Utnapishtim, a man who survived a great flood and was granted eternal life by the gods. When Gilgamesh finds him, Utnapishtim tells him the story of the flood he experienced, which was sent from the gods for no other reason than they were angry. In The Epic of Gilgamesh, the wrath of the gods is provoked for many reasons, whether it is to teach a lesson, or the gods are simply angry. Either way, the wrath of the gods is present in this poem. Another theme that is also present in The Epic of Gilgamesh is the Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 11. Epic of Gilgamesh Essay The Epic of Gilgamesh is one of earliest known pieces of literature. Through years of storytelling and translation, The Epic of Gilgamesh became a timeless classic. This story is believed to have originated from Sumerian poems and legends about the king of Uruk, Gilgamesh. Throughout the epic, many themes arose about women, love, and journeys and the one I would like to discuss is the theme of death. Also, I will discuss if Gilgamesh accepts morality at the end of the story and the development of Gilgamesh's character throughout the story. The story mainly focuses on the character Gilgamesh and this wild man created by the gods, Enkidu in which Gilgamesh and Enkidu later become good friends. Together they go upon quests to defeat...show more content... But when Enkidu dies while fighting Humbaba, one can tell a change in Gilgamesh's character. Since Enkidu was his close and only friend, it makes it more visible that everyone is mortal. One may say that, by going into the forest and facing Humbaba, Gilgamesh makes a name for himself and changes the views of the people in his city. The great accomplishment of killing Humbaba makes him a better person because he protects his city and for his love of Enkidu and his people. This is a considerable amount of change from the beginning of the story. There are no major changes in the character of Gilgamesh until Enkidu enters the picture. Enkidu is the primary reason for the ultimate changes in the personality and maturity of Gilgamesh. The main factor contributing to the changes in Gilgamesh the love that develops with Enkidu. Enkidu is made to make Gilgamesh more human. In the first paragraph of the book the gods are angry with Gilgamesh and send down an equal of himself, they send down Enkidu. After becoming friends, Gilgamesh changes because he has an equal to be with. From Cedar Forest, Gilgamesh is met by Shamash, the Sun God, who tells him, "You will never find the life for which you are searching." This upsets Gilgamesh because he has traveled so far for someone to tell him he cannot have what he wants and is looking for. For there, Gilgamesh travels to see Siduri by the sea. Siduri will not let Gilgamesh pass to through to see Utnapishtim, the only man with eternal Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 12. Examples Of Gilgamesh As A Hero Gilgamesh, in my opinion, would not be considered a "hero" because of his unscrupulous attitude towards everyone he came in contact with besides Enkidu. He was ruthless, overbearing, and cold hearted. But some view as if he was indeed a hero. In Roman and Greek literature it explains that the qualities of a hero are born of royal birth, endures physical or emotional suffering, and performs extraordinary feats. Gilgamesh possessed all of these. He was two thirds god and one third man. He went on many adventures such as the defeat of Humbaba, Utnapishtim's flood, and facing the bull sent down from the heavens. And lastly, he had to deal with the grief of Enkidu's death and face the reality that he cannot live forever and the city he has disowned Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 13. The Epic Of Gilgamesh Essay Tonisia Tutt Professor Andre World Literature 1 October 11, 2015 The Epic of Gilgamesh does not quite have a happy end. Truthfully, Gilgamesh is not successful in his mission. It is shortsighted and deceived to expect that Gilgamesh, the saint, must be effective in his journey to hold the characteristics of courage. An unsuccessful journey not harsh any more than a courageous ending is essentially joyful. For recognitions of this, we need to look no more distant than the plenty of thoughtful legends of great writing – the stories of Homer, Virgil 's Aeneid, and even Beowulf of the Anglo–Saxon abstract convention. The Illiad end with the slaughter of Troy and the passing of Achilles. The Odyssey, in spite of the fact that it sees the saint restored home, in any case includes an entirely tough cost. The Aeneid, in like manner, shows in disaster. Like Achilles, Odysseus, Aeneas, and various other exemplary legends, Gilgamesh too shows those qualities vital to an ordinary scholarly saint, none of which needs to do, truth be told, with the unique idea of pleasure. In spite of the fact that achievement is quite unimportant to the bravery of a specific journey, maybe the first indicate considered in "Gilgamesh" is that the legend might really make progress. His level of progress depends to a limited extent on what he needs to accomplish and what he accomplish. Given the included creative component of the epic that they are developments of one or more creators the accomplishment Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 14. Gilgamesh And The Epic Of Gilgamesh The maturation of Gilgamesh and his desire to acquire wisdom throughout his journey is quite apparent. By overcoming difficulties such as upholding Uruk, becoming friends with Enkidu, and various other scenarios, Gilgamesh proves that he did in fact grow up throughout the epic. As the epic starts, Gilgamesh is portrayed as a self–centered, self–admiring leader who believes that he is the only individual that can lead the city of Uruk. Gilgamesh believes that he is a god–like figure and often refers to himself as one. He believes that he is above everyone else in the city of Uruk. For example, in the epic there is a scene where Gilgamesh enters the city of Uruk, the epic describes the scene as; "He entered the city of Uruk–the–Town–Square, and a crowd gathered around. He came to a halt in the street of Uruk–the Town–Square, all gathered about, the people discussed him" (15). This quote is a good example of how Gilgamesh expected those around him to respect and look up to him as a god–like figure. He did not lead the city of Uruk humbly; he wasn't a leader who strived to feel like a normal citizen of the city. Instead, Gilgamesh felt that he was entitled to more privileges than the average person. Early on in the epic, Gilgamesh is described as a "tall, magnificent and terrible, who opened passes in the mountains, who dug wells on the slopes of the uplands, and crosses the ocean, the wide sea to the sunrise" (2). This demonstrates how selfish Gilgamesh truly was, and how all Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 15. Essay On Gilgamesh Hero's Journey Austin KayatinFormal Assignment #2 Classical and Biblical literatureFebruary 16, 2016 Is Gilgamesh a hero? Or is he a man on a wrongful crusade which is consuming him entirely? We can begin to look at the outline Campbell has created for hero's and reference it to Gilgamesh's journey. There are several paths a hero must take before his/her journey is over. The first step to a hero's journey is "The call to adventure". This is the departure stage of the hero's journey in which they are uncovering a world not yet discovered and a force not yet understood. Gilgameshs departure began with the loss of his friend, Enkidu. Gilgamesh, the king who was described as part god, and part man abandoned his kingdom in search for Utnapishtim. He hoped that...show more content... It is there were he convinced the guards to allow him through the entrance in which mortals cannot venture. The one scorpion told Gilgamesh that only gods dare to enter through the gates but the other scorpion acknowledged that two–thirds of Gilgamesh is god, so he was allowed to pass. Gilgamesh's next step in the heros outline is called the "road of trials". This is where the hero must survive a succession of trials and use everything he/she has learned leading up to this point. Gilgamesh has met Utnapishtim and has learned the story of the flood. He is consumed with so much grief and his private agenda of immortality that he ignores what everyone has been telling him. He insisted to Utnapishtim that he wants to be immortal, so he is given a test to stay awake for seven days which he ultimately fails, like Utnapishtim knew he would. Gilgamesh requested Utnapishtim for an item to show to his people of Uruk. He is told to retrieve a plant from the bottom of the sea that will make him young again if he eats it. On Gilgamesh's trip back home, a serpent steals the magical plant. Gilgamesh ignored the advice everyone Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 16. Essay On Gilgamesh And Fear Of Death In The Epic, Gilgamesh's understanding of his mortality is almost dismissive; he argues that since all men die anyway, that then they might as well risk their lives to make a name for themselves. Gilgamesh does not question the value of "making a name for himself" in a world where all great heroes are forgotten–it is enough to use his allotted years to achieve fame and glory. In this case, Gilgamesh believes that the value of life is to be remembered after death. Gilgamesh's mortality and fear of death reflect on his human side and is consistent with the human condition of fearing death. However, Enkidu views death differently. Gilgamesh rouses Enkidu with a speech, explaining to him that since all men die anyway, they should not fear...show more content... Enkidu is a vital part of Gilgamesh's life. At the beginning of the story, Enkidu embodies the opposite of Gilgamesh, his other half. After Enkidu's death Gilgamesh cannot go back to live as it was, he is lost and for the first time in his life, afraid. The fate of all humankind, death, becomes the last obstacle for Gilgamesh to conquer. When he learned of Utnapishtim– the immortal human–Gilgamesh determined to be immortal as well and now has some proof that it is possible. However, if living forever were possible than The Epic would not have a point. As Utnapishtim and Siduri tell Gilgamesh death is inevitable. Thus life should be valued. To look forimmortality is a waste of life and the gift of life should be appreciated because it has an end. Gilgamesh then wishes to give the flower of immortality to the city of Uruk and return it to its glory. This change of heart in Gilgamesh is nothing the reader would have expected at the beginning of the poem, as the poem begins with descriptions of Gilgamesh's selfish characteristics. This setup allows us to now view the distinct change in Gilgamesh and that Gilgamesh see's what immortality is. By restoring the city, he is making not only his but Enkidu's memory immortal. Gilgamesh, a figure of celestial stature, allows his mortal side to whittle away his power after the death of Enkidu. Undeniably, defenseless before the validity of his end, he leaves Uruk and begins a quest for Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 17. Essay on The Epic of Gilgamesh In the ancient Mesopotamian world, the realm of civilization was viewed to be highly illustrious. At the same time, this state of advancement of great antiquity was also an attribute of divinity. The elements of civilization were intimately associated to the highly esteemed divine mediation. Despite the prominent theology culture in The Epic of Gilgamesh, divine intervention is not the only element that could transform the crude heroic figures into sagacious men. Strength and power are definitely not the only possessions that could advance one in life even though they clearly distinguish the heroes from ordinary men. It is rather, more significantly, the process of internalization. No civilization emerges directly and independently – it is...show more content... Even though the King of Uruk is expected to be highly civilized, ironically he does not appear to be so. Overwhelmed with ego, arrogance and complete misuse of power, Gilgamesh has condemned civilization insofar his existence. He thwarts his humanity by emphasizing his strength and power in order to be more successful, forsaking the well–being of his people. Hearing the laments and cries of the people of Uruk, the gods then create Enkidu as a match for Gilgamesh. For Enkidu is a divine creation, with "[a] virtue in him like the god of war Ninurta, long waved hair of the goddess of corn Nisaba, and body of matted hair like the god of cattle Samuqan" (Sandars 63), one would have expected him to be a lesson to Gilgamesh. However, the creation of Enkidu does not really answer the people's grieving as an equal who can contend with Gilgamesh together and keep him busy from all his iniquities (Sandars 62). Enkidu can never be Gilgamesh's match as he is created completely human while Gilgamesh two third divine. This strategy, in fact, works in a different manner whereby Enkidu teaches Gilgamesh the real significance of being a human. This shows a fascinating twist as Gilgamesh's intention to "tame" Enkidu by sending him a prostitute instead mirrors his taming by Enkidu. It is because Enkidu's indulgence in sex with the prostitute "for six days and seven nights" that Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 18. Essay On The Epic Of Gilgamesh "The Epic of Gilgamesh" is a quest narrative that describes King Gilgamesh's journey and his search for immortality. This epic is considered to be the most remarkable work of ancient Mesopotamia, and one of the world's first pieces of literature (54). There is no specific author to take credit for this incredible work. It is said to have developed progressively over a prolonged span of a millennium. The epic made its first appearance during 2100 B.C.E in a series of poems written in the earliest Mesopotamian language, Sumerian (54). It was engraved into stone, one of the earliest forms of writing also known as "cuneiform". During the war, the tablets on which the epic was written disappeared under rubble. Later, they were rediscovered during the nineteenth century. Gilgamesh's epic explores what it means to be human, and how immortality can be achieved even after death. King Gilgamesh is on an important quest to achieve ultimate power beyond humanity. He is willing to travel to the depths of Earth just to reach it. Along his journey, he meets interesting characters, encounters several setbacks, and learns valuable lessons. The epic can be seen as a path that leads humans to maturity and...show more content... Goddess Ishtar was an obstacle that hindered him from reaching his destination. She persuaded her father to send down a bull from heaven as a means of punishment for Gilgamesh's disrespect (Karahashi and Lopez–Ruiz, 2006). Nonetheless, Gilgamesh meets Utnapishtim, in other words "He Who Saw Life". He was the former king of Shurrupak that served great benefit to Gilgamesh. He had the concoction Gilgamesh craved to taste, immortality; therefore, Gilgamesh sought for his assistance. However, little did Gilgamesh know that what Utnapishtim had in store was something much more valuable than eternal life Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 19. Essay on Gilgamesh Gilgamesh Death in ancient Mesopotamia was something to be dreaded. Nowhere is there mentioned an afterlife condition comparable to our ideas of heaven. Their netherworld, endured by all, must have been the prototype of our idea of hell. It's a place wherein souls "are bereft of light, clay their food" and "dirt is their drink." They are ruled over by the harrowing figure of Ereshkigal, forever rending her clothes and clawing her flesh in mourning over her endless miscarriages. These unpleasant descriptions are a natural reaction to the experience of burial, being trapped within the earth where no light can reach and nothing can grow. In Gilgamesh, Enkidu bewails his fate "to sit with the ghosts of the dead." This envokes...show more content... The wings are a mockery of their condition. They, who in life surely looked enviously upon the birds in the sky, have in death been given wings, and have nowhere to fly to. Today we speak of angels, up in heaven, getting their wings, but the imagery here is better suited to Dante's Inferno. Dirt for water, clay for food. Sounds pretty dismal, but there may be reason to believe you wouldn't want the food down there. Those who are sent on an errand to the netherworld are cautioned not to partake of any water or food offerred them. In Inanna's Descent Enki fashions an elegist and myrmidon out of the dirt beneath his fingernails, appropriately for their task is to the netherworld. Enki warns these two that, "They will offer you the river at its high water, may you not except it. They will offer you the field when in grain, may you not except it." Perhaps by refusing the water and grain they are mimicking death? More likely, the food and water of the netherworld are poisonous to mankind. When Inanna is subdued in Inanna's Descent, she is transformed into a "slab of tainted meat." Important here is the reference to butchering. Inanna is not just reduced to a rotting corpse, but a slab of meat as it would have been portioned off for human Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 20. Epic of Gilgamesh Essay examples Good King, Bad Kind Gilgamesh existed as one of the oldest known Sumerian rulers of all time and is accredited to many accomplishments. Legend has it that he created the first Sumerian civilization, constructing a city with many elaborate temples and immense walls. However, he has also been characterized as one of the cruelest and most self–centered rulers of all. Throughout the course of Gilgamesh's life he goes from being a womanizing, slave driving ruler to a negligent and stubborn king, who not even god–sent Enkidu could help transform into a better king. At first, Gilgamesh is a controlling and arrogant king, who thinks only of himself. He constantly works the men, building enormous walls surrounding the...show more content... The two immediately become companions because Gilgamesh finally finds his match. They set off on an adventure to destroy the cedar forest and its guardian, Humbaba, all to be forever remembered. Gilgamesh appears to be improving his ways and not exasperating his people. However, Gilgamesh then takes his journey to be remembered one step too far and kills the bull of heaven. This infuriates the gods so greatly that they decide that one out of Gilgamesh and Enkidu must pay for their actions. The gods therefore bestow a deadly illness upon Enkidu, which brings about his death. Enkidu's death devastates Gilgamesh, for he not only loses his best friend, but also comes to the realization that he soon too will die. Not only does Gilgamesh lose his best friend, but he also comes to the realization that he will also die some day. Thus, Gilgamesh decides to seek out immortality so he will not have to endure death. Gilgamesh sets out on his journey for immortality, leaving his kingdom and people behind to fend for themselves. He starts to become self–seeking just as he had before. He spends every waking moment searching for immortality only to benefit himself. The whole purpose of the journey itself is so that Gilgamesh can gain immortality for himself and be remembered forever. He doesn't realize that his people are off on there own with no king to control the empire. Even when Get more content on HelpWriting.net