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Fundamentals of a Good National History Day Project

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Get inside tips on putting together a good National History Day project from North Carolina's state coordinator for the program.

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Fundamentals of a Good National History Day Project

  1. 1. Fundamentals of a Good History DayFundamentals of a Good History Day ProjectProject Provided by National History Day in North CarolinaProvided by National History Day in North Carolina Office of Archives and HistoryOffice of Archives and History N. C. Department of Cultural ResourcesN. C. Department of Cultural Resources www.nchistoryday.orgwww.nchistoryday.org
  2. 2. ContentsContents  Basic Information, 3-4Basic Information, 3-4  Getting Started, 5-6Getting Started, 5-6  Developing a thesis, 7-8Developing a thesis, 7-8  Doing Research, 9-13Doing Research, 9-13  Creating a Bibliography,Creating a Bibliography, 14-1714-17  Creating a ProcessCreating a Process Paper, 18Paper, 18  Developing Your Project,Developing Your Project, 19-2219-22  Narrative v. Analysis, 23Narrative v. Analysis, 23  Categories, 24Categories, 24  Papers, 25-26Papers, 25-26  Web Sites, 27-29Web Sites, 27-29  Documentaries, 30-32Documentaries, 30-32  Performances, 33-34Performances, 33-34  Exhibits, 35-40Exhibits, 35-40  Judging, 41-45Judging, 41-45  Key Terms, 46-48Key Terms, 46-48  Contacts, 49Contacts, 49
  3. 3. Basic InformationBasic Information  Students will compete in either the junior or theStudents will compete in either the junior or the senior divisionsenior division  Junior Division is grades 6 through 8Junior Division is grades 6 through 8  Senior Division is grades 9 through 12Senior Division is grades 9 through 12  In all categories except historical papers, whichIn all categories except historical papers, which is only for individuals, you may choose tois only for individuals, you may choose to participate as an individual or in a group of 2 to 5participate as an individual or in a group of 2 to 5 peoplepeople  Students from different grades may workStudents from different grades may work together, but they must be in the same divisiontogether, but they must be in the same division
  4. 4. Basic InformationBasic Information Working in GroupsWorking in Groups • If you decide to work in a group, you need to thinkIf you decide to work in a group, you need to think about whether those you are considering working withabout whether those you are considering working with have the same work ethic and similar study/workhave the same work ethic and similar study/work habits. (For example: some students like to be readyhabits. (For example: some students like to be ready way in advance while others prefer working right toway in advance while others prefer working right to the deadline.)the deadline.) • Make sure potential teammates have the same visionMake sure potential teammates have the same vision for the project. Will everyone want to continue to workfor the project. Will everyone want to continue to work on the project as long as it advances to another levelon the project as long as it advances to another level or will they quit when the basic requirements are met?or will they quit when the basic requirements are met?
  5. 5. Getting StartedGetting Started  Begin by reading the rules for all categories. YouBegin by reading the rules for all categories. You may download them atmay download them at http://www.nhd.org/images/uploads/RuleBook14.pdf.http://www.nhd.org/images/uploads/RuleBook14.pdf.  With approval of your teacher, you may chooseWith approval of your teacher, you may choose a topic from world, national, state, or locala topic from world, national, state, or local history.history.  Your topic needs to relate to the annual theme.Your topic needs to relate to the annual theme. You may find theme information atYou may find theme information at http://www.nhd.org/AnnualTheme.htm.http://www.nhd.org/AnnualTheme.htm.  As you explore topics, make a list of how theyAs you explore topics, make a list of how they may relate to the thememay relate to the theme
  6. 6. Getting StartedGetting Started  Begin by doing preliminary research on a topicBegin by doing preliminary research on a topic that interests youthat interests you  As an example we will use the Wright BrothersAs an example we will use the Wright Brothers flightflight  Examine some secondary sources* such as aExamine some secondary sources* such as a book about the Wrights or about aviationbook about the Wrights or about aviation  *Secondary sources are ones that were written or created by*Secondary sources are ones that were written or created by someone who wassomeone who was notnot an eyewitness or a participant in thean eyewitness or a participant in the historical event or period. They are important because they providehistorical event or period. They are important because they provide context and varied opinions of the event.context and varied opinions of the event.
  7. 7. Developing a ThesisDeveloping a Thesis You need to develop a main idea that willYou need to develop a main idea that will serve as the point or points you will proveserve as the point or points you will prove in your project. The rest of your project willin your project. The rest of your project will support your thesis statement.support your thesis statement. Your thesis may begin as a question: forYour thesis may begin as a question: for example, why was the first flight soexample, why was the first flight so significant?significant? Eventually this question will be made intoEventually this question will be made into a statement—your thesis statementa statement—your thesis statement
  8. 8. On December 17, 1903, Orville andOn December 17, 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright accomplished the firstWilbur Wright accomplished the first powered flight at Kitty Hawk, Northpowered flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Even though it lasted onlyCarolina. Even though it lasted only 12-seconds, it was the foundation for12-seconds, it was the foundation for the development of aviation as wethe development of aviation as we know it today.know it today. Sample Statement
  9. 9. Doing ResearchDoing Research  Use both primary* and secondary sourcesUse both primary* and secondary sources  Use a wide variety of sources—not just theUse a wide variety of sources—not just the internetinternet  There is no minimum or maximum number ofThere is no minimum or maximum number of sources required. You should use as many assources required. You should use as many as you need to prove your thesis statement andyou need to prove your thesis statement and present various viewpoints. It is important topresent various viewpoints. It is important to have some good primary sources.have some good primary sources.  *Primary sources are ones that were created or in use during the*Primary sources are ones that were created or in use during the period being studied. They may include diaries, documents, oralperiod being studied. They may include diaries, documents, oral history interviews with people from that time, published speeches,history interviews with people from that time, published speeches, photographs, maps, music, newspapers, magazines, etc.photographs, maps, music, newspapers, magazines, etc.
  10. 10. Doing ResearchDoing Research There are many good sources on theThere are many good sources on the internet as well, but be sure to use reliableinternet as well, but be sure to use reliable sites, such as those from governmentsites, such as those from government (.gov), university (.edu) or reputable(.gov), university (.edu) or reputable organizations (.org)organizations (.org) Evaluate all web sites, as well as all otherEvaluate all web sites, as well as all other sources, as to their reliability or their biassources, as to their reliability or their bias Do not rely on unsupervised sites likeDo not rely on unsupervised sites like WikipediaWikipedia
  11. 11. Doing ResearchDoing Research As you examine your sources, keep trackAs you examine your sources, keep track of them in a notebook or on note cardsof them in a notebook or on note cards Record the information you will need toRecord the information you will need to create a bibliographic entrycreate a bibliographic entry Note whether it is a primary or secondaryNote whether it is a primary or secondary sourcesource Write down what important things youWrite down what important things you learn from the sourcelearn from the source
  12. 12. Doing ResearchDoing Research  Write down questions it raises for youWrite down questions it raises for you  Ex: Does the author have a bias or a particular pointEx: Does the author have a bias or a particular point of view? Does it contradict another source you’veof view? Does it contradict another source you’ve seen?seen?  Write down quotations or main thoughts youWrite down quotations or main thoughts you might use in your project, and be sure to includemight use in your project, and be sure to include page numberspage numbers  In secondary sources, check the bibliography toIn secondary sources, check the bibliography to see what other sources the author used that yousee what other sources the author used that you might also examinemight also examine
  13. 13. Doing Research—Places to LookDoing Research—Places to Look School, public, or college librariesSchool, public, or college libraries ArchivesArchives MuseumsMuseums Historic SitesHistoric Sites Local, State, or National OrganizationsLocal, State, or National Organizations Personal Papers or PhotographsPersonal Papers or Photographs Personal InterviewsPersonal Interviews
  14. 14. Creating a BibliographyCreating a Bibliography You will create an annotated bibliographyYou will create an annotated bibliography using either MLA or Turabian style guideusing either MLA or Turabian style guide Divide your bibliography into primary andDivide your bibliography into primary and secondary sourcessecondary sources Create an annotation for each source—Create an annotation for each source— the annotation should tell how that sourcethe annotation should tell how that source was useful in understanding your projectwas useful in understanding your project It should not be an overview of everything inIt should not be an overview of everything in the sourcethe source
  15. 15. Edmonston, Catherine. Diary of a Secesh Lady: The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereaux Edmonston. Raleigh: North Carolina Division of Archives and History, 1979. Secondary Sources Franklin, John Hope. From Slavery to Freedom. New York: A.A. Knopf, 1947. Primary Sources From this source I learned how Mrs. Edmonston viewed slaves on her plantation. It helped me see how they were viewed as property rather than people. This provided me with a good overview of the history of African Americans. Sample bibliography entries
  16. 16. Creating a BibliographyCreating a Bibliography  TipsTips  Provide a complete citation. Someone reading yourProvide a complete citation. Someone reading your bibliography should know where to go and find thatbibliography should know where to go and find that source based on the information you give.source based on the information you give.  If you pull a primary source document from aIf you pull a primary source document from a secondary source, the main source should be listedsecondary source, the main source should be listed under secondary sources. Use your annotation tounder secondary sources. Use your annotation to explain that it included some primary source items.explain that it included some primary source items.  Do not list single photographs in your bibliography.Do not list single photographs in your bibliography. List the source or website where the photo was found.List the source or website where the photo was found. If you have many instances of using a single photoIf you have many instances of using a single photo and nothing else of substance from a source, create aand nothing else of substance from a source, create a separate section of the bibliography entitled “Photoseparate section of the bibliography entitled “Photo Sources” and list them there.Sources” and list them there.
  17. 17. Creating a BibliographyCreating a Bibliography Tips—sample photo bibliographic entryTips—sample photo bibliographic entry ““The Nineteenth Century in Print.” AmericanThe Nineteenth Century in Print.” American Memory, Library of Congress. OnlineMemory, Library of Congress. Online collection.collection. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpcoop/moahtml/mnchome.htmlhttp://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpcoop/moahtml/mnchome.html This source provided a number of primary source images about 19This source provided a number of primary source images about 19th-th- century life that I was able to use in my documentary.century life that I was able to use in my documentary. Photo SourcesPhoto Sources  ““Ku Klux Klan Parade,” 1926Ku Klux Klan Parade,” 1926 http://www.flickr.com/photos/32912172http://www.flickr.com/photos/32912172  ““We Serve Whites Only,” http://blog.joehuffman.org/content/binary/WhitesOnly.gifWe Serve Whites Only,” http://blog.joehuffman.org/content/binary/WhitesOnly.gif
  18. 18. Creating a Process PaperCreating a Process Paper  Your process paper should be stapled to yourYour process paper should be stapled to your bibliography. It should not exceed 500 wordsbibliography. It should not exceed 500 words and it should tell:and it should tell:  How you chose your topicHow you chose your topic  Where you did your research (in general terms). YouWhere you did your research (in general terms). You might say “I started at my school library and went to amight say “I started at my school library and went to a university library, looked on the internet, etc.”university library, looked on the internet, etc.”  How you put your project together: some basic factsHow you put your project together: some basic facts like how you made your exhibit board, how youlike how you made your exhibit board, how you designed your props, what editing program you used,designed your props, what editing program you used, etc.etc.  How your topic relates to the themeHow your topic relates to the theme
  19. 19. Developing Your ProjectDeveloping Your Project  When you have a good grasp of your subject,When you have a good grasp of your subject, and a sufficient number of good sources, you willand a sufficient number of good sources, you will choose how to present that informationchoose how to present that information  You may choose one of 5 categories: historicalYou may choose one of 5 categories: historical paper, exhibit, performance, documentary, webpaper, exhibit, performance, documentary, web sitesite  In all categories except historical papers, youIn all categories except historical papers, you may choose to participate as an individual or inmay choose to participate as an individual or in a group of 2 to 5 people. Papers are individualsa group of 2 to 5 people. Papers are individuals only.only.
  20. 20. Developing Your ProjectDeveloping Your Project  Create an introduction that includes your thesisCreate an introduction that includes your thesis statementstatement  The body of your project should include the mainThe body of your project should include the main ideas that you learned from your research andideas that you learned from your research and that support your thesisthat support your thesis  Demonstrating historical significance requiresDemonstrating historical significance requires you to show change over timeyou to show change over time  Include context (what the situation was before theInclude context (what the situation was before the event), describe the event itself, and explain howevent), describe the event itself, and explain how history was changed because of the eventhistory was changed because of the event
  21. 21. Developing Your ProjectDeveloping Your Project  Demonstrate that you have considered differentDemonstrate that you have considered different views, including opinions that may differ fromviews, including opinions that may differ from your own, about this event. Indicate why youyour own, about this event. Indicate why you think they are right or wrong.think they are right or wrong.  Remember to make the connection to the themeRemember to make the connection to the theme wherever you can without overdoing it. It is notwherever you can without overdoing it. It is not good enough to mention it only in thegood enough to mention it only in the introduction.introduction.  Draw a conclusion that re-states the main ideasDraw a conclusion that re-states the main ideas from your thesis statementfrom your thesis statement
  22. 22. Developing Your ProjectDeveloping Your Project Create an interesting title, preferably oneCreate an interesting title, preferably one that indicates the connection to the themethat indicates the connection to the theme If needed, use a subtitle to further clarifyIf needed, use a subtitle to further clarify your ideayour idea Use the body of your project to show theUse the body of your project to show the evidence that supports your thesisevidence that supports your thesis
  23. 23. Narrative vs. AnalyticalNarrative vs. Analytical Your project must show analysis. It is notYour project must show analysis. It is not sufficient to just tell that things happen.sufficient to just tell that things happen. You must explain why they are important.You must explain why they are important. Narrative: On December 7, 1941 theNarrative: On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor.Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Analytical: On December 7, 1941 theAnalytical: On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, whichJapanese attacked Pearl Harbor, which brought the United States into the conflict andbrought the United States into the conflict and changed the outcome of the war.changed the outcome of the war.
  24. 24. CategoriesCategories  TipsTips  In choosing a category, think about your ownIn choosing a category, think about your own strengths and interests; but also think about whichstrengths and interests; but also think about which category best suits your topic. For example, if yourcategory best suits your topic. For example, if your topic does not lend itself to many images, you mighttopic does not lend itself to many images, you might want to think about a historical paper or performance,want to think about a historical paper or performance, which do not need images, rather than documentary,which do not need images, rather than documentary, which needs many.which needs many.  Once you decide upon a category, read the rules forOnce you decide upon a category, read the rules for that category periodically to make sure you arethat category periodically to make sure you are following them. Knowing and following the rules isfollowing them. Knowing and following the rules is your responsibility.your responsibility.
  25. 25. Individual Category--PapersIndividual Category--Papers Historical papers are for individualHistorical papers are for individual participation onlyparticipation only The title page should haveThe title page should have onlyonly the title,the title, the student name(s), and the category andthe student name(s), and the category and division and applicable word counts. (Seedivision and applicable word counts. (See the rule book for more information.)the rule book for more information.) Do not put art or other things on the titleDo not put art or other things on the title page, and do not use a binderpage, and do not use a binder
  26. 26. Individual Category--PapersIndividual Category--Papers  Be sure to include footnotes or citations withinBe sure to include footnotes or citations within your paper to give credit to the ideas of othersyour paper to give credit to the ideas of others  The paper must be no less than 1,500 wordsThe paper must be no less than 1,500 words and no more than 2,500 wordsand no more than 2,500 words  TipsTips  Proof, proof, proof your paper. Ask others to read it.Proof, proof, proof your paper. Ask others to read it.  Try reading it out loud to see how it sounds to youTry reading it out loud to see how it sounds to you  Be consistent in the tenses you use. Do not switchBe consistent in the tenses you use. Do not switch between past and present.between past and present.  See sample:See sample: http://www.nationalhistoryday.org/CategoryPaper.htmhttp://www.nationalhistoryday.org/CategoryPaper.htm
  27. 27. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— Web SitesWeb Sites  May contain no more than 1200May contain no more than 1200 studentstudent composedcomposed wordswords  Quotations, illustrations, charts, etc. not created byQuotations, illustrations, charts, etc. not created by the student are not included in the word countthe student are not included in the word count  Create the web site using the web site editorCreate the web site using the web site editor accessed at the NHD web siteaccessed at the NHD web site  Home page should include student name(s), title,Home page should include student name(s), title, category, division, number of student-composedcategory, division, number of student-composed words in the website, number of words in the processwords in the website, number of words in the process paper, and a menu that directs the viewer to otherpaper, and a menu that directs the viewer to other parts of the projectparts of the project
  28. 28. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— Web SitesWeb Sites  All pages must be connected with hypertextAll pages must be connected with hypertext links; automatic redirects are not permittedlinks; automatic redirects are not permitted  The bibliography must be included on the webThe bibliography must be included on the web site butsite but will notwill not be included in the word countbe included in the word count  The website may contain multimedia clips (audio, video, or both) that total no more than four minutes (e.g., use one four-minute clip, four one-minute clips, two two-minute clips, etc.). Included in the four-minute total is any music or songs that play after a page loads. Clips should not containClips should not contain student composed wordsstudent composed words
  29. 29. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— Web SitesWeb Sites  TipsTips  Be sure that the project contains all of the elements ofBe sure that the project contains all of the elements of any good History Day project—thesis statement,any good History Day project—thesis statement, body, conclusionbody, conclusion  Use images, charts, interviews, etc. to illustrate theUse images, charts, interviews, etc. to illustrate the points you will make using your 1200 wordspoints you will make using your 1200 words  Organize your web site so people may go to any ofOrganize your web site so people may go to any of the tabs and still understand your point—in otherthe tabs and still understand your point—in other words, they don’t have to go in a particular order towords, they don’t have to go in a particular order to understand it.understand it.  See sample:See sample: http://www.nationalhistoryday.org/CategoryWebsite.htmhttp://www.nationalhistoryday.org/CategoryWebsite.htm
  30. 30. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— DocumentariesDocumentaries  Documentaries may be no longer than 10Documentaries may be no longer than 10 minutesminutes  Your thesis statement should be obvious in theYour thesis statement should be obvious in the presentation. It should also have all thepresentation. It should also have all the elements of any good History Day project.elements of any good History Day project.  Include a brief list of sources at the end of theInclude a brief list of sources at the end of the projectproject  TipsTips  Create a story board that shows what illustrations willCreate a story board that shows what illustrations will be used with each part of your scriptbe used with each part of your script
  31. 31. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— DocumentariesDocumentaries  TipsTips  The strongest documentaries will have a voice narration and willThe strongest documentaries will have a voice narration and will make good use of documentary photographs and film clips (likemake good use of documentary photographs and film clips (like those documentaries you see on PBS or History Channel)those documentaries you see on PBS or History Channel)  It is good to incorporate interviews with people who experiencedIt is good to incorporate interviews with people who experienced the event or with expertsthe event or with experts  However, use only as much of a clip as you need to supportHowever, use only as much of a clip as you need to support your point. The judges want to know whatyour point. The judges want to know what youyou know.know.  Use all the time allotted to you. A 10-min documentary will haveUse all the time allotted to you. A 10-min documentary will have more info than an 8-min one.more info than an 8-min one.  See sample:See sample: http://www.nationalhistoryday.org/CategoryDocumentary.htmhttp://www.nationalhistoryday.org/CategoryDocumentary.htm
  32. 32. Sample Story BoardSample Story Board Sketch or Describe scene Opening shot of a bird in flight Outline script or voiceover For hundreds of years man dreamed of being able to soar like the birds… Production Notes Fade to next shot Sketch or Describe scene Outline script or voiceover Production Notes Sketch or Describe scene Outline script or voiceover Production Notes Sketch or Describe scene Outline script or voiceover Production Notes Sketch or Describe scene Outline script or voiceover Production Notes
  33. 33. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— PerformancesPerformances  Performances may not be longer than 10Performances may not be longer than 10 minutes in lengthminutes in length  Students are responsible for writing the scriptStudents are responsible for writing the script and creating any backdropsand creating any backdrops  TipsTips  Plan movements for each part of your play. KnowPlan movements for each part of your play. Know where you will be standing, sitting or stooping forwhere you will be standing, sitting or stooping for each part of the script. Think about facial expressionseach part of the script. Think about facial expressions and gestures. You may want to use a story boardand gestures. You may want to use a story board similar to the one for documentaries to track thesesimilar to the one for documentaries to track these things.things.
  34. 34. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— PerformancesPerformances  TipsTips  Keep sets (backdrops, props) as simple as possible.Keep sets (backdrops, props) as simple as possible. Remember you must be able to set them up and takeRemember you must be able to set them up and take them down by yourself.them down by yourself.  Costumes can be simple as well. For instance, if youCostumes can be simple as well. For instance, if you change characters within your play, you might usechange characters within your play, you might use just a hat or a shawl to indicate a new character.just a hat or a shawl to indicate a new character. Transitions should be as quick as possible.Transitions should be as quick as possible.  To be successful in performance you mustTo be successful in performance you must actact.. Project your words and show emotion!Project your words and show emotion!  See sample:See sample: http://www.nationalhistoryday.org/CategoryPerformance.htmhttp://www.nationalhistoryday.org/CategoryPerformance.htm
  35. 35. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— ExhibitsExhibits Exhibits may be no more than 6 ft. high,Exhibits may be no more than 6 ft. high, 40 inches wide, and 30 inches deep.40 inches wide, and 30 inches deep. Circular exhibits may be 30 inches inCircular exhibits may be 30 inches in diameter.diameter. They may not have any more than 500They may not have any more than 500 student-generated wordsstudent-generated words Brief citations citing sources and directBrief citations citing sources and direct quotations from others do not count in thequotations from others do not count in the 500-word limit500-word limit
  36. 36. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— ExhibitsExhibits TipsTips Begin by writing five 100-word paragraphsBegin by writing five 100-word paragraphs that describe the significance of your topic.that describe the significance of your topic. One should be your thesis statement, anotherOne should be your thesis statement, another your conclusion. The other words can beyour conclusion. The other words can be distributed among your labels to interpret yourdistributed among your labels to interpret your project.project. Do not use excessive quotations in yourDo not use excessive quotations in your exhibit. Use only those items that will help youexhibit. Use only those items that will help you make your point.make your point.
  37. 37. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— ExhibitsExhibits TipsTips Do not use large blocks of text. AnDo not use large blocks of text. An exhibit is a visual category, so youexhibit is a visual category, so you use a minimum of words and gooduse a minimum of words and good illustrations.illustrations. Make sure your exhibit is organizedMake sure your exhibit is organized logically to make it easy to followlogically to make it easy to follow
  38. 38. Individual and Group Categories—Individual and Group Categories— ExhibitsExhibits TipsTips Choose words and illustrations carefully. YourChoose words and illustrations carefully. Your board should not look cluttered.board should not look cluttered. While tri-fold designs are most often used,While tri-fold designs are most often used, you may use other designs as long as they doyou may use other designs as long as they do not exceed size limits.not exceed size limits. Use all the space allotted to you. A 6-ft exhibitUse all the space allotted to you. A 6-ft exhibit will allow for more information in an attractivewill allow for more information in an attractive layout than will a 4-ft board.layout than will a 4-ft board.
  39. 39. Sample Exhibit LayoutSample Exhibit Layout (Tri-fold design)(Tri-fold design) Th e s is S ta te m e n t C o n c lu s io n S e c tio n H e a d e r S e c t io n H e a d e r P h o to s , p ic t u r e s , d o c u m e n ts , n e w s p a p e r h e a d in g s , e t c . w ith la b e ls th a t p r o v id e c o n te x t. W h a t w e r e t h in g s lik e le a d in g u p to th e e v e n t? P h o to s , p ic t u r e s , d o c u m e n ts , n e w s p a p e r h e a d in g s , e t c . w ith la b e ls d e s c r ib in g th e h is t o r ic a l e v e n t . P h o to s , p ic t u r e s , d o c u m e n ts , n e w s p a p e r h e a d in g s , e t c . w ith la b e ls e x p la in in g h o w th in g s c h a n g e d a s a r e s u lt o f th e e v e n t. M e n t io n c u r r e n t is s u e s if a p p lic a b le . T h is p a n e l T h is p a n e l
  40. 40. Judging ProjectsJudging Projects  Projects will be reviewed by qualified judges atProjects will be reviewed by qualified judges at each level of competition. Their primary purposeeach level of competition. Their primary purpose is to help you continue to learn from youris to help you continue to learn from your experience.experience.  They will read your paperwork and view yourThey will read your paperwork and view your projectproject  The judges will ask you questions about yourThe judges will ask you questions about your project. They may ask specific questions aboutproject. They may ask specific questions about your topic or they may ask questions such asyour topic or they may ask questions such as “What was your most useful source?”“What was your most useful source?”  The judges will provide feedback to suggestThe judges will provide feedback to suggest ways to improve your projectways to improve your project
  41. 41. Judging ProjectsJudging Projects Your project will be judged on theYour project will be judged on the following criteria:following criteria: Historical Quality—60% of the scoreHistorical Quality—60% of the score The project must demonstrate:The project must demonstrate:  Historical Accuracy and Historical SignificanceHistorical Accuracy and Historical Significance  Analysis and InterpretationAnalysis and Interpretation  Historical Context and PerspectiveHistorical Context and Perspective  BalanceBalance  Solid Research using both primary and secondarySolid Research using both primary and secondary sourcessources
  42. 42. Judging ProjectsJudging Projects Clarity of Presentation—20%Clarity of Presentation—20% Original, creative, well organized, interestingOriginal, creative, well organized, interesting Written material is clear and grammaticallyWritten material is clear and grammatically correctcorrect Meets criteria for individual categoriesMeets criteria for individual categories Adherence to theme—20%Adherence to theme—20% Clearly demonstrates a relationship to theClearly demonstrates a relationship to the theme throughout the projecttheme throughout the project
  43. 43. Judging ProjectsJudging Projects TipsTips Know your topic well. If you do, youKnow your topic well. If you do, you should be prepared to answer judges’should be prepared to answer judges’ questions; however, the project shouldquestions; however, the project should be able to stand on its own. Judgesbe able to stand on its own. Judges should be able to get all the essentialshould be able to get all the essential information by looking at your projectinformation by looking at your project without you explaining it to them.without you explaining it to them.
  44. 44. Judging ProjectsJudging Projects  TipsTips  Participants in groups should be sure to contributeParticipants in groups should be sure to contribute equally to the discussion. Don’t let just one groupequally to the discussion. Don’t let just one group member dominate the conversation. Judges want tomember dominate the conversation. Judges want to know that all members participated and learned fromknow that all members participated and learned from the project.the project.  Know the rules and follow them. Points may beKnow the rules and follow them. Points may be deducted for rules violations. For a copy of the rulesdeducted for rules violations. For a copy of the rules seesee http://www.nhd.org/images/uploads/RuleBook14.pdf.http://www.nhd.org/images/uploads/RuleBook14.pdf.
  45. 45. Key TermsKey Terms  Historical Significance—demonstrates changeHistorical Significance—demonstrates change over time. In order to know if something isover time. In order to know if something is significantsignificant in historyin history, enough time must have, enough time must have passed for people to evaluate its significance.passed for people to evaluate its significance.  Primary Source—a source that was created or inPrimary Source—a source that was created or in use during the time period being studieduse during the time period being studied  Secondary Source—a source created bySecondary Source—a source created by someone who did not experience an event first-someone who did not experience an event first- handhand
  46. 46. Key TermsKey Terms  Bibliography—a list of source materials that areBibliography—a list of source materials that are used to research your project.used to research your project.  Annotation—an explanatory note that describesAnnotation—an explanatory note that describes how each source in the bibliography was usefulhow each source in the bibliography was useful in learning about your topic. (Note: it should notin learning about your topic. (Note: it should not be a description of the content of the source.)be a description of the content of the source.)  Thesis Statement—declares what you believeThesis Statement—declares what you believe and what you intend to proveand what you intend to prove  Plagiarism—using the works of others withoutPlagiarism—using the works of others without proper attributionproper attribution
  47. 47. Key TermsKey Terms  Bias—a particular way of looking at things thatBias—a particular way of looking at things that prevents unprejudiced consideration.prevents unprejudiced consideration.  Perspective—a particular point of view.Perspective—a particular point of view. Historical works should attempt to look atHistorical works should attempt to look at multiple perspectives.multiple perspectives.  Context—background information; what thingsContext—background information; what things were like before the event took placewere like before the event took place  Student Composed—text the student hasStudent Composed—text the student has created to explain the project. Includes titles,created to explain the project. Includes titles, subtitles, captions, etc. It does not include briefsubtitles, captions, etc. It does not include brief citations showing where an illustation came fromcitations showing where an illustation came from or direct quotations.or direct quotations.
  48. 48. Need Assistance?Need Assistance? ContactsContacts If you have questions about rules or topicsIf you have questions about rules or topics or need help finding sources, feel free toor need help finding sources, feel free to contact the state coordinator Jo Anncontact the state coordinator Jo Ann Williford at joann.williford@ncdcr.gov or byWilliford at joann.williford@ncdcr.gov or by calling (919) 807-7284.calling (919) 807-7284. Additional information may be found at:Additional information may be found at: www.nchistoryday.orgwww.nchistoryday.org www.nhd.orgwww.nhd.org

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