Powerful Tools For Leaders

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Powerful Tools for Leaders

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Powerful Tools For Leaders

  1. 1. Powerful Tools for Leaders – Top Five Tools You Cannot Afford to be Without Naomi Caietti, PMP Connie Figley, PMP Danelle Peddell, PMP Jo Ferguson, PMP Kathy Miller, PMP Friday, 5 October 2:15 – 3:45 PMThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  2. 2. “Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.” - John F. KennedyThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  3. 3. Agenda • Levels of Leadership – Danelle Peddell • Accelerate Your Performance Using Emotional Intelligence – Kathy Miller • Growing Others – Connie Figley • Managing Conflict – Jo Ferguson • Continuous Growth & Development – Naomi Caietti • Interactive SessionsThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  4. 4. “Be yourself, who else is better qualified.” - Frank J. Giblin IIThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  5. 5. Levels of Leadership Danelle Peddell, PMP VP Volunteers & Programs, PMI South Western Ontario Chapter 2007 Leadership Institute Masters GraduateThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  6. 6. Levels of Leadership • Think of someone you would consider a good leader • Write down their qualities • Why are they followed?This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  7. 7. Levels of Leadership Personhood People Development Production Permission Position Source: John Maxwell: Leadership 101, Thomas Nelson Publishers, 2002 by Maxwell Motivation Inc., page 72This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  8. 8. Levels of Leadership Level 1 - Position • People follow because they have to • Limited by job description • Thrive on organizational charts, always asking ‘who do they report to’ • The ‘boss’ and only the boss • Believes blame game = problem solving • Typically not effective in a volunteer organizationThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  9. 9. Levels of Leadership Level 2 - Permission • People follow because they want to • Can be hardest level – requires the ‘softer’ stuff • You can love people and not lead them, but you cannot lead people without loving them • Build solid, lasting relationships • Build solid, lasting relationshipsThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  10. 10. Levels of Leadership Level 3 - Production • People follow because of what you have done for the organization • Turnover low, commitment high • Goals are happening, things are getting done • Leading is fun! Problems overcome with minimum effort • Results are evident, published – strong metrics orientation • Get together with goal of accomplishing an objectiveThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  11. 11. Levels of Leadership Level 4 - People Development • People follow because of what you have done for them • A true leader is great because of ability to empower others • Recognition by team consistently demonstrating superior performances • Followers are loyal to the leaderThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  12. 12. Levels of Leadership Level 5 - Personhood • People follow because of who you are and what you represent • Leadership mastery- level reserved for those people larger than life itself! • Leaders can spend all their professions leading and never get here • Followers will sacrifice muchThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  13. 13. Levels of Leadership Moving Up • What level is your good leader at? • What level are you at today? • Ensure own needs are met • Ask for feedback (those whose opinions you value) • Hear, understand, respond to and act upon next 4 toolsThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  14. 14. Levels of Leadership What level do you want to be at? • PMI Personhood • Professional People Development • Personal Production Permission Position Take it to the next level! Source: John Maxwell: Leadership 101, Thomas Nelson Publishers, 2002 by Maxwell Motivation Inc., page 72This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  15. 15. “The pessimist complains about the wind. The optimist expects it to change. The leader adjusts the sails.” - John MaxwellThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  16. 16. Accelerate Your Performance Using Emotional Intelligence Kathy Miller, PMP Director-at-Large, PMI Atlanta Chapter 2007 Leadership Institute Masters GraduateThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  17. 17. What is Emotional Intelligence? The ability to monitor one’s own and others emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use the information to guide one’s thinking and actions. - Daniel GolemanThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  18. 18. Emotional Intelligence Domains Self Awareness Ability to understand your emotions and their effect on others - Goleman et al, Primal LeadershipThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  19. 19. Emotional Intelligence Competencies Self Awareness Competencies – Emotional self awareness – Accurate self-assessment – Self confidenceThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  20. 20. Emotional Intelligence Domains Self Management Ability to control impulses and suspend judgment “Think before acting”This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  21. 21. Emotional Intelligence Competencies Self Management Competencies – Emotional self-control – Transparency – AdaptabilityThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  22. 22. Emotional Intelligence Competencies Self Management Competencies cont’d – Achievement – Initiative – OptimismThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  23. 23. Emotional Intelligence Domains Social Awareness Empathy, awareness of others emotionsThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  24. 24. Emotional Intelligence Competencies Social Awareness Competencies – Empathy – Organizational awareness – ServiceThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  25. 25. Emotional Intelligence Domains Social Skills Managing relationships with othersThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  26. 26. Emotional Intelligence Competencies Relationship Management Competencies – Inspirational leadership – Influence – Developing others – Change catalystThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  27. 27. Emotional Intelligence Competencies Relationship Management Competencies cont’d – Conflict management – Building bonds – Teamwork and collaborationThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  28. 28. Emotional Intelligence - How savvy are you? - CIO magazine, March 1, 2003 You are in a meeting in which executives are discussing the company’s ERP implementation when the VP of supply chain takes credit for work you did. What do you do?This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  29. 29. Emotional Intelligence - How savvy are you? - CIO magazine, March 1, 2003 A. Confront the VP right then and there. After all, you are no pushover, and it is not fair that he get the credit you deserve. B. After the meeting, take the VP aside and tell him that you would appreciate it if in the future he would credit you when speaking about the work. C. You do not do anything. You hate conflict, and you know nothing would be gained either by making a scene or by confronting the VP. D. After the VP speaks, thank him for the work he did and give the group more specific details about what you were trying to accomplish and the challenges you overcame.This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  30. 30. The Credit Stealing Colleague By demonstrating an awareness of work place dynamics, publicly recognizing your own accomplishments in a non-threatening manner will disarm your colleague. Public confrontations can be ineffective and may look like poor sportsmanship on your part. Although less threatening, private confrontations are also less effective in that they will not help your personal reputation. A. 0 points – Immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work. B. 5 points – After the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell him that you would appreciate in the future, that he credit you when speaking about your work C. 0 points – Nothing it is not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public. D. 10 points – After the colleague speaks, publicly thank him for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish.This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  31. 31. Emotional Intelligence (EI) Tools, Tips and Techniques 1. Take responsibility for yourself – your thoughts, feelings and choicesThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  32. 32. EI Tools, Tips and Techniques 2. Turn up the volume on your empathy and become accepting.This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  33. 33. EI Tools, Tips and Techniques 3. Stop attributing negative intent to what others sayThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  34. 34. EI Tools, Tips and Techniques 4. Build high Emotional Intelligence of teamThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  35. 35. “Leaders must be close enough to relate to others, but far enough ahead to motivate them.” - John MaxwellThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  36. 36. Growing Others Connie Figley, PMP Component Services Member Advisory Group 2007 Leadership Institute Masters GraduateThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  37. 37. Growing Others “I start with the premise that the function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers.” - Ralph NaderThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  38. 38. Growing Others Motivating & Empowering Definitions Motivate: To provide with an incentive; move to action; impel Empower: 1) To invest with power; 2) To equip or supply with an ability; enable Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004.This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  39. 39. Growing Others Motivating & Empowering What is the difference? Motivate Empower • Lack of ownership • Ownership • Lack of authority • Authority to act • Making people want to work • Internal happiness • External force • Internal drive to get resultsThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  40. 40. Growing Others Empowerment Have you ever been in a situation of having “all the responsibility but none of the authority”? To empower someone you need to give them the authority and keep or share the responsibility.This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  41. 41. Growing Others “One is too small a number to achieve greatness.” - John C. MaxwellThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  42. 42. Growing Others Mentoring • What is it? • Why is it important? • How do you do it?This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  43. 43. Growing Others Mentoring • Many other terms are used to describe similar activities to mentoring – Coaching, equipping, counseling, teaching, etc. Definition: • Mentor: To serve as a trusted counselor or teacher, especially in occupational settings. Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004.This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  44. 44. Growing Others Mentoring • Why do it? – People who are not growing and developing in their jobs – leave. – Developing your people makes you a better leader – Individuals who become better leaders become mentors themselvesThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  45. 45. Growing Others Mentoring Tips and Techniques • Actively seek out opportunities to mentor • Maximize mentoring as a learning experience • Be engaged as a mentor • Know your strengths and challenges as a mentor • Know your team; those you are mentoring • Find a mentor for yourselfThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  46. 46. “Great leaders are almost always great simplifiers, who can cut through argument, debate, and doubt to offer a solution everybody can understand.” - General Colin PowellThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  47. 47. Managing Conflict Jo Ferguson, PMP VP Membership, Columbia River Basin Chapter 2007 Leadership Institute Masters GraduateThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  48. 48. Conflict • Conflict is increasingly intense disagreement • Conflict is not necessarily bad • Leaders in teams need to learn to recognize conflict: – Before it starts – During the conflictThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  49. 49. A Conflict Model Sender Problem Receiver • Stage 1 - Communication is open, The Problem although both disagree • Stage 2 - Communication is The Problem partially closed, although the problem is still being considered The Problem • Stage 3 - Communication is closed and the only objective is to protect self-worth Source: Adapted from work originally published by Dr. Elias H. Porter and the Personal Strengths Publishing, Inc.This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  50. 50. Strong Will We all know strong will when we see it: “Whenever I am backed into a corner and told “Do it or else”, I simply ‘else’, I may not be confrontational or loud, but I know there is nothing I really have to do – except die, which I am willing to do. And since I’m willing to die and you’re not, I win (Okay, I’m dead, but I win).” - Cynthia Ulrich Tobias, You can’t Make Me (But I can be Persuaded)This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  51. 51. Engaged Strong Will is Not Conflict • Know when your strong will is engaged • Know when strong will is engaged in others • When someone engages your strong will, do not challenge - make a temporary truce • When you see two strong wills engaged in your team members, carefully take action • Remember that strong will can be a positive forceThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  52. 52. Communication Issues May Not Indicate Conflict Communication from the same point of view - Agreement is highly likely, even if it looks like violent disagreement Data Communication from different points of view – Conflict is highly likely, so a common vision is necessary Data DataThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  53. 53. Recognizing Strong Will Versus Communication Issues • Strong will or communication issues can look like conflict, but have subtle differences • Tools to recognize the differences: – Learn to listen to your body – Listen effectively • Words • Tone • Pitch – Watch others’ body languageThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  54. 54. Tips to Manage Conflict • Recognize the difference between strong will, communication issues, or conflict • Understand and know yourself and your team members • Acknowledge the conflict • Control your emotions, but legitimize the feelings of team members • Recognize the stage of conflict that people are in • Help conflicted team members focus on the other, the problem, and themselvesThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  55. 55. More Tips to Manage Conflict • Tell your team know how you deal with conflict • Involve the entire group to resolve conflict • Make sure that your project team is aligned • Take a time-out and allow the team members to disengage • Bottom line: reflect, reflect, reflect • Remember, conflict can be positive or negative – learn to use it wiselyThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  56. 56. “You dont just stumble into your future. You create your own future.” - Roger SmithThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  57. 57. Continuous Growth and Development Naomi Caietti, PMP PMI Professional Awards Member Advisory Group PMI ISSIG Assistant Director Component Affairs 2007 Leadership Institute Masters GraduateThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  58. 58. Continuous Growth and Development “To master or thrive on change, we need to embrace perpetual growth and development, continuous learning, and constant improvement. Thats the stuff true change leadership is made of.” Source: Jim Clemmers article, "Mastering Change Through Continuous Growth, Learning, and Improvement"This is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  59. 59. Benefits of Leadership Tools Tools Benefits Levels of Leadership Flexibility Emotional Intelligence Self Awareness Growing Others Development Managing Conflict Adaptability Continuous Growth and Continuous Learning DevelopmentThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  60. 60. Personal Vision • Definition #1: What you want to be, do, feel, think, own, associate with, and impact by some date in the future • Definition #2: Senge defines personal vision as what you want to create of yourself and the world around you http://www.mentoringgroup.com/html/articles/mentee_2.html CCC/THE MENTORING GROUP, www.mentoringgroup.com, 13560 Mesa Drive, Grass Valley, CA 95949, USA, Phone: 530.268.1146 Fax: 530.268.3636 e-mail: info@mentoringgroup.comThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  61. 61. Why Should You Create a Personal Vision? • It is YOUR unique leadership strategy • Showcases your greatest passions in life • Motivates you to inspire those around you to reach their own dreams • Encourages you to define your path to success personally and professionallyThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  62. 62. Tips on Continuous Learning Hone Your Personal Leadership Style • Find a mentor • Mentor other component volunteers or leaders • Read or listen to leadership books • Participate in webinars, podcasts, and educational training for personal improvement • Establish your own rules of engagementThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  63. 63. Tips on Continuous Learning continued Stretch and Grow • Step out of your safety zone without a net! – Develop new skills – Network with leaders who are in positions you aspire to – Take on new responsibilities • Take time out for reflection • Maintain balance in your lifeThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.
  64. 64. Execution – Five Tools • Begin your journey of self discovery and celebrate your level of leadership • Manage your emotions as well as others and lead your teams and organizations with a calmer focus • Develop more leaders through mentoring. • Understand and recognize conflict in order to adapt and lead your team to focus on the problem and themselves to find the best solution • Grow and develop your leadership skills one day at a time and you will become a better leaderThis is the property of the Project Management Institute and may not bereproduced or disseminated without the expressed written permission of PMI.

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