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making your culture work

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a Learning Lab to understand the importance of culture and practice with Schneider's model on organisational culture

Published in: Leadership & Management
  • Love this presentation. Is it possible to get it as a pdf to print he cards out better? Many Thanks
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  • Great job! the schneider matrix is very interesting to raise awareness of corporate culture and to compare with an Agile culture. We use it at Orange.
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making your culture work

  1. 1. making your culture work Prepared by: Nikolaos Batsios, Agile Coach @ Intracom-Telecom S.A Fredrik Mank, Agile Coach @ Ericsson Ericsson’s High Performance Team Coaching, Learning Lab September 2015
  2. 2. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› LL Objective › Entry: –Your experiences › Goal: –Understand why culture is important and how you can observe it –Highlight culture module such as Schneider, Denison & Laloux models on organization culture –Experiment with Schneider's culture module –Reflect on your own organization culture › Exit: –Map values and principles from theory to your reality and address potential improvements –Help your surrounding to take the next step
  3. 3. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› NEED FOR POWER Get and Keep Control The meaning and importance of culture
  4. 4. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› The meaning and importance of culture EXPERTISE VISIONARY
  5. 5. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› The meaning and importance of culture cultivation Non-violence Acceptance Respect grow
  6. 6. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› The meaning and importance of culture THINK DIFFERENT CHALLENGE THE STATUS QUO DIVERSITY
  7. 7. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› The meaning and importance of culture THERE IS NO MAGIC FORMULA FOR GREAT COMPANY CULTURE THE KEY IS JUST TO TREAT YOUR STAFF HOW YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE TREATED
  8. 8. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› The meaning and importance of culture FOCUS ON ONE THING SOCIAL MOVE FAST AND BREAK THINGS PARTNERSHIP
  9. 9. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› › …set of patterns of human activity within a bed or social group and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. Customs, laws, dress, architectural style, social standards, religious beliefs, and traditions are all examples of cultural elements. A culture...
  10. 10. Group discussion Is culture important? Why?
  11. 11. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› › Provides consistency for an organization and its people › Provides order and structure › Establishes and internal way of life for people (boundaries, ground rules, communication patterns, membership criteria) › Determines conditions for internal effectiveness (rewards, punishment, expectations, priorities, nature and use of power) › Sets patterns for internal relationships among people › Defines effective and ineffective performance › … culture is so important because…
  12. 12. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› Culture models... Schneider model
  13. 13. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› Culture models... Denison model
  14. 14. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› Culture models... Laloux model
  15. 15. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› › One observer per group! › In the handout you can find a set of cards representing some important dimensions related to each core culture. › For every dimension there are 4 different cards and each one of them is most suitable to just one core culture › As a group try to map every card from ever dimension in the core culture you believe is most suitable Group exercise (part 1)
  16. 16. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› Where the organization pays attention?, insights, innovation, inspiration, ideals, beliefs, meaning of relationships Where the organization pays attention? Facts, what can be seen, measured, tangible reality How the organization decide? People driven, participative, informal, emotional, important to people oriented, evolutionary How the organization decide? Detached, formal, scientific, emotionless, principle and law oriented
  17. 17. Group discussion
  18. 18. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› based on Schnieder’s model
  19. 19. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› › One observer per group › Think of your own organization › For every ten (10) dimensions that you have already mapped in the every quadrant, try to keep the card that represents most your organization and remove the rest ones. Group exercise (part 2)
  20. 20. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› example, of your own organizational culture
  21. 21. Group discussion
  22. 22. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› › Variant 1 - Agile Values and Principles: – Try to Map the Agile Manifesto values and principles in Schneider’s model to the extend possible. – Compare your results between your dominant organization culture outcome and the agile manifesto dominant culture. – Do they fit? › Variant 2 - Lean Values and Principles: – Try to map each one of the Lean values and principles in the most suitable culture quadrant – Compare your results between your dominant organization culture outcome and the innovation values. – Do they fit? › Variant 3 - Team Values: – Try with your team to map all dimensions as described in Shneider’s model in the most appropriate quadrand – Keep those that most represent your team now – IWhere do you want to be as a team? Are there any actions to move forward? Group exercise
  23. 23. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› › Speaker notes: William Scneider – Why Good Management Ideas Fail – Understanding Your Corporate Culture › How to make Your Culture Work (using Schneider model) by Michael Sahota › Laloux Culture Model, by Michael Sahota › Lean & Agile Adoption with the Laloux Culture model, by Peter Green › Reinventing Organizations, Frederic Laloux › The Reengineering Alternative, William Schneider › The Future of Management is Teal, Frederic Laloux References
  24. 24. handouts
  25. 25. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› › “Archetype”: the social institution origin of each one of the four cultures › “Way to Success”: how success is defined in each culture and the way the organization could succeed › “Leadership Focus”: the role of leader and leadership style in every culture › “Employee Role”: main employees characteristics and behaviors in every culture › “Decisions”: the way decisions are being made in every core culture › “Key Norms”: main norms and values characterize each organizational core culture › “Power Focus”: The nature of power and/or authority › “Climate”: describes the organizational environment related to relationships in every core culture › “Change”: approach to change › “Customers”: The way organizations approach their customer depending on their core culture Main Dimensions
  26. 26. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#›
  27. 27. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#›
  28. 28. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#›
  29. 29. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#›
  30. 30. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› Base management decisions on a long-term philosophy, even at the expense of short-term financial goals Move toward flow; move to ever-smaller batch sizes and cycle times to deliver value fast & expose weakness. Use pull systems; decide as late as possible. Level the work - reduce variability and overburden to remove unevenness. Build a culture of stopping and fixing problems; teach everyone to methodically study problems. Master norms (practices) to enable kaizen and employee empowerment. Use simple visual management to reveal problems and coordinate. Use only well-tested technology that serves your people and process. Grow leaders from within who thoroughly understand the work, live the philosophy, and teach it to others. Develop exceptional people and teams who follow your company’s philosophy. Respect your extended network of partners by challenging them to grow and helping them improve. Go see for yourself at the real place of work to really understand the situation and help. Make decisions slowly by consensus, thoroughly considering options; implement rapidly. Become and sustain a learning organization through relentless reflection and kaizen. Lean Principles
  31. 31. back up slides
  32. 32. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› How culture evolves › Pictures from Meetup in San Jose, USA (at PayPal Town Hall, 2015-02-18) presented by Michael Spayd
  33. 33. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› Daniel "Dan" R. Denison is Professor of Organization and Management at IMD Business School in Lausanne, Switzerland and Chairman and founding partner of Denison Consulting. His area of special interest is organizational culture and leadership, and the impact they have on the performance and effectiveness of organizations. His work on organizational culture is heavily cited in the field, and he is the author of a seminal article on the distinction between organizational culture and climate (the notion of organizational climate predates that of the organizational culture). His model of organizational culture is widely known and used in academic research in organizational culture, effectiveness and performance
 
 Dan Denison's research, teaching, and consulting focuses on organizational culture and leadership and the impact that they have on the performance and effectiveness of organizations. His latest book, with IMD colleague Robert Hooijberg, Leading Culture Change in Global Organizations: Aligning Culture and Strategy, was published in June 2012. His research has shown a strong relationship between organizational culture and business performance metrics such as profitability, growth, customer satisfaction, and innovation. He has consulted with many leading corporations regarding organizational change, leadership development, and the cultural issues associated with mergers & acquisitions, turnarounds, and globalization.
 
 Professor Dan Denison has written four other books, including Corporate Culture and Organizational Effectiveness, published by John Wiley in 1990. He is also the author of the Denison Organizational Culture Survey and the Denison Leadership Development Surveys. His articles have appeared in leading journals such as The Academy of Management Journal, The Academy of Management Review, Organization Science, The Administrative Science Quarterly, and The Journal of Organizational Behavior. He is the Chairman of Denison Consulting › Professor Dan Denison › Organization and Management
 PhD University of Michigan
 dan.denison@imd.ch DAN DENISON
  34. 34. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› William E. schneider
  35. 35. Nikolaos Mpatsios, Fredrik Mank | Ericsson Internal | 2015-05-11 | Page ‹#› Frederic Laloux Frederic Laloux works as an adviser, coach, and facilitator for corporate leaders who feel called to explore fundamentally new ways of organizing. A former Associate Partner with McKinsey & Company, he holds an MBA from INSEAD and a degree in coaching from Newfield Network in Boulder, Colorado. 
 
 His groundbreaking research in the field of emerging organizational models has been described as groundbreaking, brilliant, spectacular, impressive, and world-changing by some of the most respected scholars in the field of human development. Frederic Laloux lives in Brussels, Belgium, with his wife, Hélène, and their two children. http://www.reinventingorganizations.com/

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