Molas de Panamá y Tapetes de Otavalo

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Molas de Panamá y Tapetes de Otavalo

  1. 1. MOLAS AND OTAVALAN TAPESTRY MAKING DAY!!!<br />SAN BLAS, PANAMA<br />OTAVALO, ECUADOR<br />
  2. 2. MOLAS <br />DE <br />PANAMÁ<br />
  3. 3. HISTORY/INFORMATION: <br />Molas are the brightly colored appliqué panels made only in the San Blas region of Panama by the Kuna Indians. The Kunas have resided in the Panama/Colombia area for centuries. They managed to survive successive waves of European exploration and settlement. During the 1800s, the Indians began migrating eastward. The commercial activity of this introduced them to cloth, scissors, needles, and thread, thereby beginning the body adornment and clothing that was needle worked. The Kuna Indian women's traditional costume is colorful and the wearer expresses pride in her Kuna identity.<br />The term Mola can mean "cloth," "clothing," or "blouse." Girls learn to make Molas at a young age. A woman might spend up to 100 hours completing a Mola. The source for traditional design inspiration for Molas include the following: natural-world native animals (iguanas, lizards, parrots, fish), local vegetation (palm trees, coconut crops, sea grasses), and the shapes of the coral reefs around the San Blas islands.<br />
  4. 4. MOLAS DE PANAMA<br />
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  13. 13. EXAMPLES OF STUDENTS WORK<br />
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  15. 15. TAPETES DE OTAVALO ECUADOR<br />
  16. 16. OTAVALAN TAPESTRY<br />
  17. 17. Otavalo<br />Otavalo is two to three hours north of Quito by bus (20,000 sucres) <br />and sits between the Imbabura and Cotacachi volcanoes. Otavalo <br />(population 25,000) is famous for its Saturday Indian market, which <br />dates back to pre-Inca times. The Quechuan and Imbayan cultures<br /> populated scattered villages in what is today, Otavalo. <br />Saturday is the main market and worth the trip - There are three main plazas in which to see the market in full swing. Poncho Plaza is the main one for crafts, and you'll find lots of blankets, scarves, fajas, ponchos and tapestries. Otavaleños are very distinct-looking - the men have long braided hair and wear blue ponchos, white calf-length pants and alpargatas (sandals), while the women wear white blouses with embroidered flowers, an anaco (wrapped dress) and alpargatas. Otavaleños are world-famous for their arts,crafts and textiles and you can find them in every city and town of Ecuador (Agato is most popular village for this). Agato is about 5 miles from Otavalo and is a small weaving village. <br />
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  22. 22. Procedure<br />Choose 4 colors of paper. Cut out a design as the top piece. Choose a traditional Kuna Indian design for a shape.<br />Leaving a thin border, cut out the second color around the first shape. Glue the top to the second layer. You can use paper clips to help hold the paper together when cutting the shapes.<br />Then cut the third shape by layering the two glued shapes on top of the third. Glue all cut pieces together, being sure to leave a thin border around each time you cut. Save the black for last, as that is the traditional top layer.<br />From the scraps of paper left, cut out and glue details for eyes, mouths, or other ornamental traditional designs.<br />

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