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Inherited white matter diseases• Primary demyelination – loss of normalformed myelin with preservation of axons. E.g–MS• S...
• Lysosomal and Peroxisomal Disorders-  specific catabolic enzymes are deficient,  resulting in the accumulation of products...
sphingolipidoses• Metachromatic Leukodystrophy- s the most  common lysosomal disorder and is  characterized by a deficiency...
• MR features of MLD include symmetric confluent  areas of high signal in-tensity on the T2-weighted  images within the per...
• Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) shows  evidence of in-creased signal within the white  matter abnormalities, with occas...
Metachromatic leukodystrophy. (a) T2-weighted MR image demonstrates bilateral confluent areas of   high signal intensity i...
•    Metachromatic    leukodystrophy. (a) T2-    weighted MR image    shows numerous linear    tubular structures with    ...
•   Metachromatic leukodystrophy    with involvement of the    corticospinal tract. (a) T2-    weighted MR image shows    ...
Krabbe Disease• Clinical features- Krabbe disease, or globoid cell  leukodys-trophy (GLD), is an autosomal recessive  inhe...
• The most characteristic MR finding in both the infantile  and late-onset forms of GLD is high signal intensity on  the T2...
•    Krabbe disease in a 2-year-old boy. T2-weighted MR image demonstrates symmetric high-signal-    intensity areas in th...
Mucopolysaccharidoses• The mucopolysaccharidoses include a group of  inherited metabolic disorders in which a lysosomal  e...
• Magnetic Resonance Findings- include poor gray  white matter differentiation with multiple patchy  areas of high signal ...
•    Mucopolysaccharidosis in a 4-year-old boy with Hurler disease. (a) T1-weighted MR image shows    multiple well-define...
Peroxisomal disorders• Peroxisomes absent  Zellweger Syndrome  Neonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy   Infantile Refsum Disease• p...
• Adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by deficiency  of enzyme acyl-CoA synthesase. This prevents  breakdown of very long-chain...
• Imaging• CT- large, symmetric low density lesions in parieto   occipital regions.• MR- three histopathologic zones can b...
• Contrast enhancement occurs at the lateral  margin of the zone of demyelination.• Decrease in NAA peak, increased lacate.
•   ALD in a 5-year-old    boy. (a) T2-weighted MR    image shows symmetric    confluent demyelination    in the peritrigo...
Zellweger Syndrome• Zellweger syndrome, or cerebrohepatorenal  syndrome, is an autosomal recessive disorder  caused by mul...
•   Zellweger syndrome in a 5-month-old girl. (a) T2-weighted MR image shows extensive areas of    diffuse high signal int...
Diseases Caused by Mitochondrial             Dysfunction• Mitochondrial encephalopathy comprises a  heterogeneous group of...
MELAS Syndrome• Patients with MELAS syndrome usually appear healthy at birth with  normal early development, then exhibit ...
• MR imaging demonstrates multiple cortical  and subcortical infarct-like lesions that cross  vascular boundaries, along w...
•    MELAS syndrome in a 10-year-    old boy with migrating    infarction. (a) Initial T2-    weighted MR image shows a   ...
Leigh Disease• Leigh disease, or subacute necrotizing  encephalomyelopathy, is an inherited, progressive,  neurodegenerati...
• Typical MR imaging findings include symmetric  putaminal involvement, which may be  associated with abnormalities of the...
•   Leigh disease in a 2-year-old boy. (a) T2-weighted MR image shows    bilateral high-signal-intensity areas in the puta...
Canavan Disease• Canavan disease or spongy degeneration of the  brain, is an autosomal recessive disorder of  amino acid m...
• T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrates  symmetric areas of homogeneous, diffuse low  signal intensity throughout the white ...
•   Canavan disease in a 6-    month-old boy with    macrocephaly. (a)T2-    weighted MR image shows    extensive high-sig...
Alexander Disease• Alexander disease, or fibrinoid leukodystrophy, is  characterized at pathologic analysis by massive  de...
• Alexander disease has a predilection for the frontal  lobe white matter early in its course. CT demonstrates  low attenu...
•    Alexander disease in a 5-year-old boy with macrocephaly. (a) T2-weighted MR    image shows symmetric demyelination in...
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Inherited white matter diseases

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Inherited white matter diseases

  1. 1. Inherited white matter diseases• Primary demyelination – loss of normalformed myelin with preservation of axons. E.g–MS• Secondary demyelination – known aetiologywith preferential destruction of myelin andaxons. E.g – ADEM,PML, osmoticdemyelination,etc.• Dysmyelination- defective formation ormaintenance of myelin.
  2. 2. • Lysosomal and Peroxisomal Disorders- specific catabolic enzymes are deficient, resulting in the accumulation of products (such as lipid, carbohydrate, or mu- copolysaccharide) that interfere with cell function and eventually lead to cell death. e.g - sphingolipidoses, mucopolysaccharidoses, and mucolipidoses
  3. 3. sphingolipidoses• Metachromatic Leukodystrophy- s the most common lysosomal disorder and is characterized by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase.• Autosomal recessive, 80% b/w 1-2 yrs.• Clinical- gait disturbance, frequent falls,seizures,mental deterioration,hypertonia.
  4. 4. • MR features of MLD include symmetric confluent areas of high signal in-tensity on the T2-weighted images within the periventricular and cerebellar white matter, with sparing of the subcortical U fibers until late in the disease• The signal abnormality progresses from the anterior to the posterior direction.• High signal intensity is seen on the T2-weighted images along the path of the corticospinal tracts in the posterior limbs ofthe internal capsules and brainstem• Distinguishing features of MLD include absence of contrast enhancement, frequent involvement of cerebellar white matter, and lack of involvement of deep gray matter.
  5. 5. • Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) shows evidence of in-creased signal within the white matter abnormalities, with occasional demonstration of the “tigroid” pattern, with decreased signal on the ADC map.• MR spectroscopy- decreased NAA,increase myo-inositol.
  6. 6. Metachromatic leukodystrophy. (a) T2-weighted MR image demonstrates bilateral confluent areas of high signal intensity in the periventricular white matter. Note the classic sparing of the subcortical U fibers (arrowheads). (b) Contrast material-enhanced MR image shows lack of enhancement in the demyelinated white matter, a finding that is characteristic of metachromatic leukodystrophy.
  7. 7. • Metachromatic leukodystrophy. (a) T2- weighted MR image shows numerous linear tubular structures with low signal intensity in a radiating (“tigroid”) pattern within the demyelinated deep white matter. (b) T2-weighted MR image shows a punctate (leopard skin) pattern in the demyelinated centrum semiovale, a finding that suggests sparing of the white matter. (c) On a contrast-enhanced T1- weighted MR image, the tigroid pattern seen in aappears as numerous punctate foci of enhancement (arrows) within the demyelinated white matter, which is unenhanced and has low signal intensity (leopard skin pattern).
  8. 8. • Metachromatic leukodystrophy with involvement of the corticospinal tract. (a) T2- weighted MR image shows bilateral high-signal-intensity areas in the periventricular white matter with posterior predominance. The corpus callosum is also involved (arrows). (b) T2-weighted MR image obtained at a lower level shows involvement of the descending pyramidal tracts of the medulla (arrows) and deep cerebellar white matter. Evolution of metachromatic leukodystrophy. (a) T2-weighted MR image shows bilateral confluent areas of high signal intensity in the periventricular white matter with sparing of the subcortical U fibers. (b)Follow-up MR image obtained 2 years later still demonstrates bilateral high- signal-intensity areas, but now with involvement of the subcortical U fibers (arrows). Mild ventricular dilatation with widening of the sulci suggests diffuse cortical atrophy.
  9. 9. Krabbe Disease• Clinical features- Krabbe disease, or globoid cell leukodys-trophy (GLD), is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder that commonly presents within the first 6 months of life. Deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme galactocerebroside- galactosidase results in the accumulation of galactocerebroside in macrophages.• By 6 months of age, the infant pre-sents with spasticity, irritability, and fever, without signs of infection
  10. 10. • The most characteristic MR finding in both the infantile and late-onset forms of GLD is high signal intensity on the T2-weighted images found along the lengths of the corticospinal tracts. Additional findings in the early- onset form include abnormal signal intensity within the cerebellar white matter and deep gray nuclei (dentate,basal ganglia, thalamus), with progressive involvement of the parietooccipital white matter and posterior portion of the corpus callosum.• Classically, the subcortical U fibers arespared until late in the disease.• The CT findings of hyperdense thalami,caudate nuclei, and corona radiata are characteristic but not specific
  11. 11. • Krabbe disease in a 2-year-old boy. T2-weighted MR image demonstrates symmetric high-signal- intensity areas in the deep white matter. The internal and external capsules are also involved (arrowheads). Note the bilateral areas of abnormal signal intensity in the thalami (arrows).
  12. 12. Mucopolysaccharidoses• The mucopolysaccharidoses include a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which a lysosomal enzyme deficiency results in the inability to degrade the mu-copolysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans) heparan sulfate, ker-atan sulfate, and/or dermatan sulfate. All of the mucopolysaccharidoses are inherited by an autosomal recessive transmission, except for Hunter disease, which is an X-linked recessive.• clinical features are shared by these disorders, including the typical gargoyle features, numerous skeletal abnormalities(dwarfism), cardiac anomalies, CNS abnormalities, and frequent involvement of the visual and auditory systems.
  13. 13. • Magnetic Resonance Findings- include poor gray white matter differentiation with multiple patchy areas of high signal intensity on the T2-weighted images within theperiventricular white matter.• Prominent cystic or dilated perivascular spaces may also be seen, which represent vacuolated cells distended with mucopolysaccharide.• Thickening of the skull and meninges can be seen. Spinalcord compression is common, especially at the foramen mag-num and upper cervical level, resulting from dural thickening secondary to mucopolysaccharide deposits. Spinal cord com- pression may also be seen in association with atlantoaxial sub-luxation or thoracic gibbus. Nerve root compression has alsobeen described.
  14. 14. • Mucopolysaccharidosis in a 4-year-old boy with Hurler disease. (a) T1-weighted MR image shows multiple well-defined areas of low signal intensity in the central and subcortical white matter. (b) T2-weighted MR image demonstrates multiple well-defined areas of high signal intensity in the deep and subcortical white matter.
  15. 15. Peroxisomal disorders• Peroxisomes absent Zellweger Syndrome Neonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy Infantile Refsum Disease• peroxisomes present with single enzyme deficiency Adrenoleukodystrophy ( x-linked) Adrenomyeloneuropathy Hyperoxaluria type 1 Pseudo-zellweger syndrome• Peroxisomes present with multiple enzyme defects Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata
  16. 16. • Adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by deficiency of enzyme acyl-CoA synthesase. This prevents breakdown of very long-chain fatty acids, which accumulate in numerous tissues.• X- linked ALD is seen in males. Affects b/w 3- 10 yrs.• Clinical – visual and behavioral disturbances are the most frequent initial symptoms. Seizures, hearing loss, spastic quadraparesis occurs.
  17. 17. • Imaging• CT- large, symmetric low density lesions in parieto occipital regions.• MR- three histopathologic zones can be delineated on MR. - central necrotic zone is seen as a hypointense signal on T1W1 and a homogeneously very hyperintense region on T2. - the intermediate zone of active demyelination and inflammation enhances following contrast - peripheral- nonenhancing edematous area that is slightly hypointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2.Abnormal signals is usually present in the lateral geniculate bodies and auditory pathways, as well as the corpus callosum, splenium and corticospinal tracts.
  18. 18. • Contrast enhancement occurs at the lateral margin of the zone of demyelination.• Decrease in NAA peak, increased lacate.
  19. 19. • ALD in a 5-year-old boy. (a) T2-weighted MR image shows symmetric confluent demyelination in the peritrigonal white matter and the corpus callosum.(b) On a T1- weighted MR image, the peritrigonal lesions appear hypointense.(c) Gadolini um-enhanced T1- weighted MR image reveals a characteristic enhancement pattern in the intermediate zone (arrows) representing active (d) ALD involving the corpus callosum splenium. T2-weighted MR image shows the corpus callosum splenium with diffuse high signal intensity (arrows). No abnormality of the periventricular white matter is seen.
  20. 20. Zellweger Syndrome• Zellweger syndrome, or cerebrohepatorenal syndrome, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by multiple enzyme defects and characterized by liver dysfunction with jaundice, marked mental retardation, weakness, hypotonia, and craniofacial dysmorphism. It may lead to death in early childhood. The severity of disease varies and is determined by the degree of peroxisomal activ-ity.
  21. 21. • Zellweger syndrome in a 5-month-old girl. (a) T2-weighted MR image shows extensive areas of diffuse high signal intensity in the white matter. The gyri are broad, the sulci are shallow, and there is incomplete branching of the subcortical white matter, findings that suggest a migration anomaly with pachygyria. (b) On a T1-weighted MR image, the white matter abnormalities demonstrate low signal intensity.
  22. 22. Diseases Caused by Mitochondrial Dysfunction• Mitochondrial encephalopathy comprises a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders caused by a proved or proposed defect in the oxidative metabolic pathways of energy production, probably owing to a structural or functional mitochondrial defect. Some reasonably well-defined disorders include MELAS syndrome, Kearn-Sayre syndrome, Leigh disease, and MERRF syndrome .
  23. 23. MELAS Syndrome• Patients with MELAS syndrome usually appear healthy at birth with normal early development, then exhibit delayed growth, episodic vomiting, seizures, and recurrent cerebral injuries resembling stroke.• Stroke like events, probably the result of a proliferation of dysfunctional mitochondria in the smooth muscle cells of small arteries, may give rise to either permanent or reversible deficits.• At light microscopy, MELAS syndrome is characterized by the presence of ragged red fibers in skeletal muscle. This finding simply implies degeneration of granular fibers and a proliferation of mitochondria.• At electron microscopy, the affected tissue demonstrates an increased number of mitochondria, which are enlarged and have lipoid inclusions.• Serum and cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels are usually elevated.
  24. 24. • MR imaging demonstrates multiple cortical and subcortical infarct-like lesions that cross vascular boundaries, along with varying degrees of generalized cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. The parietal and occipital lobes and the basal ganglia are frequently involved. Follow-up MR images may show resolution and subsequent reappearance of the abnormal areas.• MELAS is distinguishedfrom MERRF and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) by thestrokelike events and episodic vomiting.
  25. 25. • MELAS syndrome in a 10-year- old boy with migrating infarction. (a) Initial T2- weighted MR image shows a high-signal-intensity lesion in the left occipital lobe (arrows). Prominent cortical sulci are seen in the right occipital lobe, a finding that suggests cortical atrophy.(b) On a contrast- enhanced T2-weighted MR image, the lesion demonstrates no enhancement. (c) Follow-up MR image obtained 15 months later shows another lesion in the left temporal area (arrowheads). (d) Photomicrogr aph (original magnification, ×40; Gomori methenamine silver stain) of the muscle biopsy specimen reveals scattered ragged red fibers (arrows). (e) Electron micrograph reveals an increased number of mitochondria (arrows), which are somewhat irregular in shape.
  26. 26. Leigh Disease• Leigh disease, or subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy, is an inherited, progressive, neurodegenerative disease of infancy or early childhood.• Affected infants and children typically present with hypotonia and psychomotor deterioration. Ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, ptosis, dystonia, and swallowing difficulties inevitably ensue.• Characteristic pathologic abnormalities include microcystic cavitation, vascular proliferation, neuronal loss, and demyelination of the midbrain, basal ganglia, and cerebellar dentate nuclei and, occasionally, of the cerebral white matter
  27. 27. • Typical MR imaging findings include symmetric putaminal involvement, which may be associated with abnormalities of the caudate nuclei, globus pallidi, thalami, and brainstem and, less frequently, of the cerebral cortex. The cerebral white matter is rarely affected. Enhancement may be seen at MR imaging and may correspond to the onset of acute necrosis.
  28. 28. • Leigh disease in a 2-year-old boy. (a) T2-weighted MR image shows bilateral high-signal-intensity areas in the putamen and globus pallidus (arrows). (b) On a T1-weighted MR image, the lesions demonstrate low signal intensity (arrows).
  29. 29. Canavan Disease• Canavan disease or spongy degeneration of the brain, is an autosomal recessive disorder of amino acid metabolism found predominantly in children of Ashkenazi Jewish decent.• It is due to deficiency of NAA acylase with excessive accumulation of NAA.• Clinical signs and symptoms become manifest within the first few months of life, marked by hypotonia, head lag, increased head circumference(greater than 98 th%), seizures, and failure to achieve motor mile-stones.
  30. 30. • T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrates symmetric areas of homogeneous, diffuse low signal intensity throughout the white matter, whereas T2-weighted imaging shows nearly homogeneous high signal intensity throughout the white matter. The subcortical U fibers are preferentially affected early in the course of the disease. In rapidly progressive cases, the internal and external capsules are involved, and the cerebellar white matter is usually affected as well. As the disease progresses, atrophy becomes conspicuous.
  31. 31. • Canavan disease in a 6- month-old boy with macrocephaly. (a)T2- weighted MR image shows extensive high-signal- intensity areas throughout the white matter, resulting in gyral expansion and cortical thinning. Striking demyelination of the subcortical U fibers is also noted. (b) T1-weighted MR image shows demyelinated white matter with low signal intensity. (c) Photomicrogr aph (original magnification, ×200; hematoxylin-eosin stain) shows ballooning of the myelin sheaths of oligodendrocytes due to massive intramyelinic edema.
  32. 32. Alexander Disease• Alexander disease, or fibrinoid leukodystrophy, is characterized at pathologic analysis by massive deposition of Rosenthal fibers (dense, eosinophilic, rodlike cytoplasmic inclusions found in astrocytes) in the subependymal, subpial, and perivascular regions• Characterized by early onset of macrocephaly, psychomotor retardation, and seizure. Death occurs within 2–3 years.• The diagnosis is made on the basis of a combination of macrocephaly, early onset of clinical findings, and imaging findings, but definite diagnosis usually requires brain biopsy or autopsy.
  33. 33. • Alexander disease has a predilection for the frontal lobe white matter early in its course. CT demonstrates low attenuation in the deep frontal lobe white matter. Enhancement is often seen near the tips of the frontal horns early in the disease course. The characteristic frontal lobe areas of hyperintensity are seen at T2- weighted MR imaging. These hyperintense areas progress posteriorly to the parietal white matter and internal and external capsules. The subcortical white matter is affected early in the disease course. In the late stages of the disease, cysts may develop in affected regions of the brain.
  34. 34. • Alexander disease in a 5-year-old boy with macrocephaly. (a) T2-weighted MR image shows symmetric demyelination in the frontal lobe white matter. The internal and external capsules and parietal white matter are also involved. (b)Photomicrograph (original magnification, ×100; hematoxylin-eosin stain) of the pathologic specimen shows deposition of Rosenthal fibers (arrows).

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