Community Heritage Grants
Workshop

National Archives of Australia
Topics
 Storage, including location,
environment, packaging
 Monitoring
 Handling and use
 Disasters
 Security
Preservation of Collections
Knowing your collection
• What type of material do you
have?
• How much do you have?
• Is it in good or bad condition?
• A...
Physical protection – Levels

1. Location

2. Building

3. Room

4. Furniture 5. Housing
Level 1: Storage Location
Where is your collection stored? What are the risks?
Level 2: Storage Building

Buildings chosen for records storage should:
• Be well constructed and secure
• Be fully weathe...
Level 3: Storage Room

Rooms chosen for records storage should:
• Have no external walls.
• Have cool, dry, stable conditi...
Level 4: Storage Furniture
Do:
• Give easy access
• Have clear labelling
• Use shelves made of coated metal
• Start shelve...
Level 5: Housing
• Use only archival materials – see our website for
information
• Think about your storage location and e...
Level 5: Housing

Oversized items
• Large items should be stored flat in folders,
Solander boxes or portfolios
• Plan cabi...
Using storage levels
Levels 3 and 4
the storage
environment or
room, and
shelving

Level 5
holds several objects together ...
Storage – Environment
• Most materials in archival collections like
cool, dry, stable conditions.
– Stability is important...
Storage – Light
• Light = heat + UV; causes extreme and irreversible damage.
• Most changes are slow and not obvious, so i...
Storage – Pests and Mould
• Insects eat organic materials.
• Mice, rats and birds can also damage collections.

• Moulds d...
Handling and Use
Do:

Don’t:

• Insist on clean hands
or gloves
• Keep work areas
clean and free from
clutter
• Store vuln...
Security
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Supervise the reference area
Ensure twenty-four hour protection
Separate the reference and...
Disasters
 Some obvious disaster scenarios are
flood, fire and earthquake.

 Large outbreaks of insect, pest or mould
ac...
Monitoring your collection
• Check storage area regularly
for insects and environment
– Insects: sticky traps
– Environmen...
If you discover a problem
•
•
•
•
•

Pests: sudden increase in numbers or types
Mould: new growth
Environment: unusual flu...
Help and information
• Follow your organisation’s disaster plan

• Check information sheets at national and state
institut...
Protecting and preserving small collections by Prue McKay
Protecting and preserving small collections by Prue McKay
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Protecting and preserving small collections by Prue McKay

732 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
732
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Further levels include the building and its location.
  • Protecting and preserving small collections by Prue McKay

    1. 1. Community Heritage Grants Workshop National Archives of Australia
    2. 2. Topics  Storage, including location, environment, packaging  Monitoring  Handling and use  Disasters  Security
    3. 3. Preservation of Collections
    4. 4. Knowing your collection • What type of material do you have? • How much do you have? • Is it in good or bad condition? • Are some items more important or valuable than others? • Does the material need to be better organised? • What resources do you have?
    5. 5. Physical protection – Levels 1. Location 2. Building 3. Room 4. Furniture 5. Housing
    6. 6. Level 1: Storage Location Where is your collection stored? What are the risks?
    7. 7. Level 2: Storage Building Buildings chosen for records storage should: • Be well constructed and secure • Be fully weatherproof • Have good drainage • Be well maintained
    8. 8. Level 3: Storage Room Rooms chosen for records storage should: • Have no external walls. • Have cool, dry, stable conditions • Be away from known risks • Have reduced light levels • Be secure • Have functional fire and smoke detection systems • Be subject to good housekeeping practices.
    9. 9. Level 4: Storage Furniture Do: • Give easy access • Have clear labelling • Use shelves made of coated metal • Start shelves 150 mm off the floor • Have tables nearby Don’t: • Store items on outer walls • Use the top of shelving units • Store items on the floor
    10. 10. Level 5: Housing • Use only archival materials – see our website for information • Think about your storage location and environment and how this will impact on your requirements for packaging • Package appropriately for the format, and for easy access • Poor packaging can be worse for a collection than no packaging • Repackage anything that is currently poorly housed • Extra paper and card packaging can be used as insulation inside boxes containing collection items
    11. 11. Level 5: Housing Oversized items • Large items should be stored flat in folders, Solander boxes or portfolios • Plan cabinets are preferable to open shelving • Interleaving or encapsulating items is recommended • Very large items can be rolled individually around cores
    12. 12. Using storage levels Levels 3 and 4 the storage environment or room, and shelving Level 5 holds several objects together as a group, e.g. a box, and wraps around or encloses an individual object, e.g. a folder around a file. If Level 5b is Archival Archival Not archival Not archival And Level 5a is Archival Not archival Archival Not archival Then Levels 4 and 3 are Less important Important Important Extremely important Ideal storage: Level 3 fully controlled stable conditions, Level 4 inert materials and Level 5 archival
    13. 13. Storage – Environment • Most materials in archival collections like cool, dry, stable conditions. – Stability is important – Ideal conditions: • 20°C ± 2° • 50% relative humidity ± 5% • Make sure there are no humid spots where mould can grow. • Reduce dust and pollution Paper cockled (wobbly) from too many changes in humidity
    14. 14. Storage – Light • Light = heat + UV; causes extreme and irreversible damage. • Most changes are slow and not obvious, so it is difficult to know they are occurring. • Paper will go yellow or brown and turn brittle. • Dyes will fade. • Block sunlight in storage areas, using curtains or blinds • Turn off lights when storage area is not in use • Store vulnerable items in opaque containers
    15. 15. Storage – Pests and Mould • Insects eat organic materials. • Mice, rats and birds can also damage collections. • Moulds digest and break down the materials they feed on. • Mould can be hazardous to your health. • Learn about and practise Integrated Pest Management • Monitor your storerooms • Store items in closed containers • Practise good housekeeping in storage and work areas • Keep humidity below 65%
    16. 16. Handling and Use Do: Don’t: • Insist on clean hands or gloves • Keep work areas clean and free from clutter • Store vulnerable items so they can be protected while viewed • Make working copies of very fragile items • Use supports to carry items • Make items easy to locate and retrieve • Eat or drink in storage areas or work areas • Use document feeders to photocopy fragile material • Pack items too tightly into boxes or shelves • Use pen on or near original material – always use pencil • Use post-it notes, plastic flags or PVC paperclips on original material
    17. 17. Security • • • • • • • • • • • Supervise the reference area Ensure twenty-four hour protection Separate the reference and storage areas Do not leave materials unattended or exposed Require researchers to register Institute a borrowing system to track materials Restrict the amount of material a researcher can use at one time Don't let researchers bring large bags Explain your research rules, restrictions, and facilities on a sign or handout Don't allow archival material to leave the premises Examine records after use
    18. 18. Disasters  Some obvious disaster scenarios are flood, fire and earthquake.  Large outbreaks of insect, pest or mould activity also count as disasters.  Create a Disaster Preparedness Plan  Store your collection safely  Monitor your collection  Monitor the storage areas  Regularly clean storage areas  Keep disaster response materials handy Flood at Uni of WA, 2010 Example of disaster bin
    19. 19. Monitoring your collection • Check storage area regularly for insects and environment – Insects: sticky traps – Environment: data loggers or non-recording monitors for temperature and relative humidity • Check items regularly for mould, insect and other damage.
    20. 20. If you discover a problem • • • • • Pests: sudden increase in numbers or types Mould: new growth Environment: unusual fluctuations or high/low humidity Disaster: leaking roof, fire damage Security: lost or stolen materials • Determine what has changed since last normal results/readings • Rectify if possible, or call for help • Consult your Disaster Preparedness Plan
    21. 21. Help and information • Follow your organisation’s disaster plan • Check information sheets at national and state institutions • See useful web links on your handout • Contact a conservator – find them via the AICCM website (www.aiccm.org.au)

    ×