Week12 early20th c

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  • Sir/Mam, I am Feddie Cayabyab from Phil. a high school teacher and interested with your presentation.I just would like to ask you a favor to download your presentation for educational purposes. This will be very usefull and help students to better understands this kind of arts. I' am looking forward for your kind consideration. Thank you in advance. God bless!
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Week12 early20th c

  1. 1. Oliver Vernon @ David B. Smith Gallery 1543 A Wazee Street Denver, CO 80202 p 303.893.4234 | f 877.893.4234 11:30 on Wednesday April 7
  2. 3. <ul><li>Painting outdoors, dappled light, brushy paint </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Impressionism </li></ul></ul>
  3. 4. <ul><li>1886-1892 – Post-Impressionism </li></ul><ul><li>Generally, they considered Impressionism too casual or too naturalistic, and sought a means of exploring emotion in paint. </li></ul><ul><li>what they had in common was the rejection of the transient moment in favor of enduring concepts. </li></ul>
  4. 5. The Post-Impressionists Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Poster artist known as one of the first Graphic Designers Paul Cezanne Large block-like brushstrokes; Still lifes, Landscapes Vincent Van Gogh Loose brushstrokes and bright, vivid colors George Seurat Founder of Pointillism; Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte Auguste Rodin Bronze sculptor; Very loose and not detailed Paul Gauguin Broad color areas, stong outlines, tertiary color harmonies, exotic subjects
  5. 6. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec ” At the Moulin Rouge” . 1895
  6. 7. Edgar Degas, The Absinthe Drinker, 1876
  7. 8. Degas, Women on the Terrace of the Café, 1877
  8. 9. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec La Goulue , 1891.
  9. 10. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Ambassadeurs: Aristide Bruant 1892.
  10. 11. <ul><li>Cezanne broke space up into geometric, solid forms: rectangular landscape, pyramid-shaped mountain. His brushstrokes are also geometric. A favorite subject of his was this mountain near his home, which he drew or painted 75 times. </li></ul><ul><li>Picasso was intrigued by his writings on viewing nature in terms of its geometric structure: the cube, cylinder, and cone. This was an influence on the later Cubism movement. </li></ul>
  11. 12. Paul Cezanne, Card Players , 1890-92.
  12. 13. Paul Cezanne, Still Life with Apples , 1890.
  13. 14. Paul Cezanne, Still Life with Peppermint Bottle , 1890-94.
  14. 15. PAUL CÉZANNE, The Basket of Apples, ca. 1895. Oil on canvas, 2’ 3/8” x 2’ 7”.
  15. 16. Paul Cezanne, Mont Saint Victoire , 1885.
  16. 17. Instead of flattening space, he did the opposite. He actually broke space up into geometric, solid forms: rectangular landscape, pyramid-shaped mountain
  17. 18. Piet Mondrian
  18. 19. Van Gogh, The Potato Eaters , 1885.
  19. 20. Van Gogh, The Fourteenth of July in Paris , 1886-1887
  20. 22. Van Gogh Sunflowers , 1888.
  21. 23. Van Gogh The Night Cafe , 1888.
  22. 24. Vincent Van Gogh, Bedroom at Arles #3 , 1889.
  23. 25. Egon Schiele Artist's Room in Neulengbach, 1911 | oil on wood | 40x32cm
  24. 26. VINCENT VAN GOGH, Starry Night, 1889. Oil on canvas, approx. 2’ 5” x 3’ 1/4”. Museum of Modern Art, New York
  25. 29. Paul Gauguin, Te Aa No Areois (the Seed of Areoi), Oil on Burlap, 1892, 36x28”
  26. 30. PAUL GAUGUIN, The Vision after the Sermon or Jacob Wrestling with the Angel, 1888. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 3/4” x 3’ 1/2”.
  27. 31. PAUL GAUGUIN, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?, 1897. Oil on canvas, 4’ 6 13/ 16” x 12’ 3”.
  28. 32. GEORGES SEURAT, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, 1884–1886. Oil on canvas, approx. 6’ 9” ´ 10’. The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago
  29. 33. Georges Seurat's The Circus (oil on canvas, 73x 59-1/8 inches), 1890
  30. 34. Fauves <ul><li>The fauves (wild beasts) gained this name through the use of wild, subjective colors. </li></ul><ul><li>Fauvism did not last long, a mere three years or so, but was crucial for the development of modern art. </li></ul><ul><li>Fauvism was part of a larger trend in Europe called Expressionism, which arose as artists came to believe that the fundamental purpose of art was to express their intense feelings toward the world. </li></ul>
  31. 35. Henri Matisse, Le Bonheur de Vivre (The Joy of Life), 1905-06. Oil on canvas, 5’ 8” x 7’ 9”
  32. 36. HENRI MATISSE, Red Room (Harmony in Red), 1908–1909. Oil on canvas, approx. 5’ 11” x 8’ 1”.
  33. 37. ANDRÉ DERAIN, The Dance, 1906. Oil on canvas, 6’ 7/8” x 6’ 10 1/4”.
  34. 38. Impressionism to Expressionism <ul><li>Impressionism </li></ul><ul><li>Post-Impressionism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pointillism </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fauvism </li></ul><ul><li>Expressionism </li></ul>
  35. 39. EDVARD MUNCH, The Cry, 1893. Oil, pastel, and casein on cardboard, 2’ 11 3/4” x 2’ 5”. National Gallery, Oslo.
  36. 40. Edward Munch, &quot;Madonna&quot; ,1894. 
  37. 41. Jasper Johns SCENT Lithograph, linocut and woodcut, 1976 Edward Munch, Self Portrait: Between Clock and Bed 1940-42; Oil on canvas, 149.5 x 120.5 cm
  38. 42. Daniel Richter &quot;tuwenig„, 2004 212 x 261 cm / 83 3/7 x 102 3/4 &quot;
  39. 43. Egon Schiele, Seated Nude with Extended Right Arm, 1910, Black chalk and watercolor on paper
  40. 48. <ul><li>Die Brucke (the bridge) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kirchner </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Influence of Munch </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Der Blaue Reiter (the blue rider) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vasili Kandinsky </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Franz Marc </li></ul></ul>
  41. 49. Expressionism and the Avant-Garde <ul><li>The avant-garde was originally a military term, referring to the detachment of soldiers that went first into battle. </li></ul><ul><li>Expressionism, which arose as artists came to believe that the fundamental purpose of art was to express their intense feelings toward the world. </li></ul>
  42. 50. ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER, Street, Dresden, 1908 (dated 1907). Oil on canvas, 4’ 11 1/4” x 6’ 6 7/8”. Museum of Modern Art, New York
  43. 51. VASSILY KANDINSKY, Improvisation 28 (second version), 1912. Oil on canvas, 3’ 7 7/8” x 5’ 3 7/8”. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
  44. 54. FRANZ MARC, Fate of the Animals, 1913. Oil on canvas, 6’ 4 3/4” x 8’ 9 1/2”.
  45. 57. Otto Dix &quot;Machine Gunners Advancing&quot; from Der Krieg (1924)
  46. 60. OTTO DIX, Der Krieg (The War), 1929–1932. Oil and tempera on wood, 6’ 8 1/3” x 13’ 4 3/4”.
  47. 61. EMIL NOLDE, Saint Mary of Egypt among Sinners, 1912. Left panel of a triptych, oil on canvas, approx. 2’ 10” x 3’ 3”.
  48. 63. <ul><li>Harsh emotion, social criticism, subjective color, dynamic compositions, frequently used contour lines </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Expressionism as seen in the work of Schiele, and Kirchner </li></ul></ul>
  49. 64. Picasso <ul><li>Blue Period </li></ul><ul><li>Rose Period </li></ul><ul><li>African-Influenced Period </li></ul><ul><li>Cubism </li></ul><ul><li>Classicism and Surrealism </li></ul><ul><li>Later Works </li></ul>
  50. 65. Pablo Picasso,”First Communion”, 1895-6, oil on canvas, 166 x 118 cm, Museu Picasso, Barcelona. The Tragedy 1903, oil on wood, 1.053 x .690 m (41 7/16 x 27 3/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington Les Demoiselles d'Avignon Paris, 1907 Oil on canvas 8' x 7'8&quot; (243.9 x 233.7 cm.) The Museum of Modern Art, New York
  51. 66. Picasso (Rose period)
  52. 67. Egon Schiele, Fraulein Beer , Oil on Canvas, 190x120 cm, 1914
  53. 68. Pablo Picasso The Tragedy , 1903
  54. 69. GEORGES BRAQUE, The Portuguese, 1911. Oil on canvas, 3’ 10 1/8” x 2’ 8”.
  55. 70. GEORGES BRAQUE, Bottle, Newspaper, Pipe and Glass, 1913. Charcoal and various papers pasted on paper, 1’ 6 7/8” x 2’ 1 1/4”.
  56. 71. Guernica shows the Nazi German bombing of Guernica, Spain, by twenty-eight bombers, on April 26, 1937 during the Spanish Civil War. The attack killed between 250 and 1,600 people, and many more were injured.
  57. 72. PABLO PICASSO, Guernica, 1937. Oil on canvas, 11’ 5 1/2” x 25’ 5 3/4”. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid.
  58. 75. Picasso Basquait
  59. 76. <ul><li>Responses to Cubism: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Italian Futurism: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Began in February 1909 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Futurists decided that motion itself was the glory of the new 20th century. Celebrated speed, energy, industrialization </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2. Russian Suprematism: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kazimir Malevich was leader of the Russian avant-garde. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>- Founded in 1915. </li></ul>
  60. 77. Giacomo Balla, Swifts Paths of Movement – Dynamic Sequences
  61. 78. UMBERTO BOCCIONI, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space, 1913 (cast 1931). Bronze, 3’ 7 7/8” high x 2’ 10 7/8” x 1’ 3 3/4”. Museum of Modern Art, New York
  62. 79. Umberto Boccioni. States of Mind: The Farewells . 1911. Oil on canvas. 70. x 96cm.
  63. 80. Umberto Boccioni, Charge of the Lancers , Tempera and collage on board, 32x50 cm, 1915
  64. 81. GINO SEVERINI, Armored Train, 1915. Oil on canvas, 3’ 10” x 2’ 10 1/8”. Collection of Richard S. Zeisler, New York.
  65. 82. CONSTANTIN BRANCUSI, Bird in Space, 1928. Bronze (unique cast), 4’ 6” x 8” x 6” high.
  66. 83. Kazimir Malevich. Suprematist Painting (Eight Red Rectangles) . 1915. Oil on canvas. 57 x 48 cm
  67. 84. KAZIMIR MALEVICH, Suprematist Composition: Airplane Flying, 1915 (dated 1914). Oil on canvas, 1’ 10 7/8” x 1’ 7”.
  68. 85. <ul><li>De Stijl : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dutch = ‘The style’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Founded in Leiden in 1917 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Style of austere (severe) abstract clarity </li></ul></ul>
  69. 86. Art Nouveau <ul><li>Popular at the turn of the century – 1890-1905 </li></ul><ul><li>Style of art, architecture and decorative arts </li></ul><ul><li>Characterized by organic, floral, plant-inspired motifs, with highly stylized curvilinear forms.’ </li></ul><ul><li>Bridges Neoclassicism and modernism </li></ul>
  70. 87. <ul><li>Organic, floral, plant-like motifs, stylized curvilinear forms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Art Nouveau </li></ul></ul>
  71. 89. Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939) 'Job' 1898 Colour lithograph
  72. 91. Alfons MUCHA &quot;DONNA BIZANTINA BRUNA&quot;, 1897
  73. 93. Gustav Klimt, Judith , 1901

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