For Sidney Bechet
h"p://
www.youtube.com/
watch?
v=zEOeeOtXOKU	
  
	
  
What is the poem about?
•  Larkin	
  writes	
  about	
  the	
  	
  
Jazz	
  composer	
  Sidney	
  Bechet	
  who	
  
he	
  ...
The Structure
•  Larkin	
  makes	
  the	
  poem	
  
have	
  a	
  jazz	
  beat,	
  and	
  the	
  rhyme	
  
scheme	
  and	
 ...
The First Stanza
•  In	
  the	
  first	
  stanza	
  the	
  
music	
  is	
  described	
  with	
  the	
  ‘shakes	
  
like	
  ...
The Second Stanza
•  The	
  first	
  scenario	
  of	
  love	
  	
  
and	
  beauty	
  is	
  described	
  in	
  the	
  	
  
s...
The Third Stanza
•  The	
  third	
  stanza	
  is	
  about	
  	
  
the	
  darker	
  side	
  of	
  New	
  Orleans.	
  	
  
‘...
The Fourth Stanza
•  In	
  this	
  stanza	
  Larkin	
  	
  
describes	
  the	
  wannabes,	
  that	
  sit	
  in	
  
the	
  ...
The Fifth Stanza
•  This	
  stanza	
  describes	
  	
  
how	
  music	
  affects	
  Larkin	
  himself.	
  	
  
He	
  uses	
 ...
The Sixth Stanza
•  Larkin	
  says	
  that	
  music	
  	
  
understands	
  him,	
  and	
  speaks	
  to	
  him	
  	
  
like...
Comparison – Love Songs In Age
•  Larkin	
  wrote	
  the	
  poem	
  
about	
  an	
  elderly	
  widow	
  who	
  	
  
finds	
...
Comparison – An Arundel Tomb
•  In	
  this	
  poem	
  Larkin	
  has	
  
a	
  posiPve	
  view	
  on	
  love	
  and	
  life,...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

For Sidney Bechet

146 views

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
146
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

For Sidney Bechet

  1. 1. For Sidney Bechet
  2. 2. h"p:// www.youtube.com/ watch? v=zEOeeOtXOKU    
  3. 3. What is the poem about? •  Larkin  writes  about  the     Jazz  composer  Sidney  Bechet  who   he  was  a  big  fan  of.     •  In  the  poem  New  Orleans  (birth   place  of  jazz)  is  described,  filled   with  happy  people  and  music.   •  There  is  a  posiPve  reflecPon   of  memories,  reminded  by     music,  about  love  and  happy   Pmes.    
  4. 4. The Structure •  Larkin  makes  the  poem   have  a  jazz  beat,  and  the  rhyme   scheme  and  stanza  scheme  is     unusual  and  unexpected  like  a     jazz  song.   •  The  poem  is  an  apostrophe     because  Larkin  talks  to     someone  as  though  they  were   present.  
  5. 5. The First Stanza •  In  the  first  stanza  the   music  is  described  with  the  ‘shakes   like  New  Orleans  reflect  in  the  water’.     This  simile  is  split  over  two  lines,   the  word  ‘shakes’    put  at  the   end  to  ripple  onto  the  next  line.  There     is  a  theme  of  water  in  this  stanza.     •  The  poem  is  set  up  as  a  cause    and  effect,  how  the  music  causes     people  to  imagine  different  places.  
  6. 6. The Second Stanza •  The  first  scenario  of  love     and  beauty  is  described  in  the     second  stanza.     •  ‘Balconies,  flower-­‐baskets  and     quadrilles’  are  romanPc  and     pre"y  features.  A  quadrille  is  a     square  dance  for  couples.     •  Everyone  is  ‘making  love’  and     ‘going  shares’  which  means     taking  it  easy.  This  is  a  calm,     relaxed  and  fun  atmosphere.    
  7. 7. The Third Stanza •  The  third  stanza  is  about     the  darker  side  of  New  Orleans.     ‘Storyville’  is  the  red-­‐light  district.   •  Larkin  describes  the  ‘sporPng-­‐house  girls’  (prosPtutes)   as  ‘like  circus  Pgers’.  Larkin  places  women  in     a  negaPve,  degrading  view  that’s  quite  sexist.  He   compares  the  ‘girls’  as  animals,  however  they     are  tamed  because  they  are  being  controlled.     Before  this  the  ‘Pgers’  were  wild  and     dangerous.     •  Larkin  refers  to  the  bible  that  states  ‘who     can  find  a  virtuous  woman?  For  her  price  is  far     above  rubies’.     •  If  women  were  priced  above  rubies  this  could     mean  that  they  were  expensive.  
  8. 8. The Fourth Stanza •  In  this  stanza  Larkin     describes  the  wannabes,  that  sit  in   the  audience.  ‘Manques’  are     would-­‐be  scholars.  The  word  also   meaning  ‘to  lack’  in  French,  the     scholars  unfulfilled  of  their  dreams.   •  Larkin  uses  a  simile  ‘like  old     plaids’  to  describe  the     audience.  Plaids  could  mean     they  are  interwoven  and  engrossed   into  the  music  as  its  close  to  them.  
  9. 9. The Fifth Stanza •  This  stanza  describes     how  music  affects  Larkin  himself.     He  uses  the  pronouns  ‘me’  and  ‘’my’.   •  The  music  makes  him  feel  the  way     love  is  said  to  make  people  feel.     However  this  could  be  a  paradox     because  he  thinks  he  loves  music,    but  doesn’t  know  because     he’s  never  loved.     •  ‘Like  an  enormous  yes’  is  a     caesura,  this  making  an  emphasise     on  Larkin’s  posiPve  view.  
  10. 10. The Sixth Stanza •  Larkin  says  that  music     understands  him,  and  speaks  to  him     like  a  person;  it  is  the  ‘natural  noise     of  good’.     •  ‘Long-­‐haired  grief  and  scored  pity’,     implies  that  when  Larkin  listens     to  music  he  forgets  his  problems.     This  relates  to  the  African  Americans,     how  jazz  music  was  based  on  their     music  and  ‘scored  pity’  is  a  pun    on  a  musical  score,  referring  to  the   pity  felt  when  listening  to  this  genre.    
  11. 11. Comparison – Love Songs In Age •  Larkin  wrote  the  poem   about  an  elderly  widow  who     finds  the  sheet  music  of  some     songs  she  used  to  play  when     she  was  young,  and  the  cello     plays  a  version  of  Bechet’s  blues     as  a  nostalgic  song  making     her  relive  memories.   •  Both  poems  are  about  music     and  how  they  relate  to  memories    and  love.    
  12. 12. Comparison – An Arundel Tomb •  In  this  poem  Larkin  has   a  posiPve  view  on  love  and  life,  with   a  happier  a^tude  compared  to  his   usual  themes.     •  Love  lasts  through  Pme,     whether  this  be  as  a  sculptural     tomb  or  in  the  form  of  music.    

×