FROM THOUGHT
TO ACTION
Today you will…
• Learn what “design thinking” is
• Learn how it has been successfully used in various industries
• Learn ...
Intel Confidential
Intel Confidential
..design thinking..
‘a human centered, creative, iterative and
practical approach to finding the best i...
Source: Stanford University d.school, Creative Common License
Flare
Focus
Build to Learn, Create and Iterate
Intel Confide...
Examples
Intel Confidential
Jane
Chen
Nagunand Murty
Razmig
Hovaghimian
Linus Liang
Rahul Panicker
Intel Confidential
20,000,000
Premature &
Low Birth Weight
Babies
Intel Confidential 13
$25,000
User Empathy & “Aha” moments.
Intel Confidential
Intel Confidential
Ideation and low resolution prototypes
Test &
Iteration
Intel Confidential
The EMBRACE Infant Warmer
Less than 1% the cost Thousands of lives saved
Intel Confidential
Akshay KothariAnkit Gupta
“Let’s
build an
app!”
Apple’s App Store “Hall of Fame”
TIME magazine top 50 iPhone app
Intel Confidential
Doug Dietz , innovation architect, GE Healthcare
d.thinking coach @ Stanford
Intel Confidential
Fantastic technology
Intel Confidential
Fantastic technology
Intel Confidential
But more than 80% of children must be sedated before use.
Intel Confidential
Studied users. Prototyped and iterated.
Intel Confidential
Now..Less than 10% of children are sedated
New problem: Kids want to do it again !
*http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/15/opinion/...
Empathize Ideate
Prototype
Test
Define
17 Focus Areas Investigated
2600+ Ideas Generated
70+ Usages Validated
6+ PoC/Apps ...
User-Focused App
Innovation
Intel Confidential
Source: Stanford University. Creative Common License, Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported.
Flare
Focus
d.thi...
Take-aways
• Identify who your user is. Talk with them.
• Establish a problem statement worth solving
• Step away from pow...
Additional Design Thinking resources
There are many books and videos available for anyone who wishes to learn more about D...
NPC 2014 North - From thought to action - Sachin Kelkar, Intel Software and Services Group
NPC 2014 North - From thought to action - Sachin Kelkar, Intel Software and Services Group
NPC 2014 North - From thought to action - Sachin Kelkar, Intel Software and Services Group
NPC 2014 North - From thought to action - Sachin Kelkar, Intel Software and Services Group
NPC 2014 North - From thought to action - Sachin Kelkar, Intel Software and Services Group
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NPC 2014 North - From thought to action - Sachin Kelkar, Intel Software and Services Group

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Presentation by Sachin Kelkar, Head - Scale Software Programs for Asia Pacific, Intel Software and Services Group at NASSCOM Product Conclave 2014 - North.

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  • Not new , concept , lot of hype
    Edison , hands on innovator
    Famous saying 1000 ways of doing differently
    Experimenting , prototyping
    Processes
     
    Not about one person but about a team
     
    Definition - many definition

    D thinking in heart of 3 vectors
    Designer sense
    Tech feasibility
    Eco viability


    Design Thinking is a lineal descendant of that tradition . Put simply it is a discipline that used the designer’s sensibility and methods to match people’s need with what is Technologically feasible and what is economically viable business strategy into customer value & market opportunity
  • Mindshare
     
    Getting ready mentally
    Why we are doing this
    Not in isolation
    Spread the culture
    Ijmprove velocity , drive intercations , create culture
    Lean startup - standford
    New buzzword -
  • Developed and promoted by universities like Stanford and innovation firms like IDEO, design thinking is a user-focused, possibility oriented innovation methodology that any team can apply to build creative solutions for complex problems. Our team alone has trained thousands of Intel leaders on the process and we have used it directly in myriad programs and projects to drive innovation.

    Design thinking uses a multi-phase approach.

    You navigate through a series of phases that bounce between “flaring” where you generate as many ideas and insights as possible and “focus” where you apply criteria to your ideas to identify the best ones you wish to proceed with.

    You first EMPATHIZE with users, through open-ended interviews and observation, identifying needs, emotions, and insights you can build on.

    You take those needs and insights and DEFINE a problem statement or Point of View worth pursuing, something you can get passionate about.

    You then IDEATE using a number of techniques to generate as many broad and bold ideas as possible about how you can address the challenge you’ve defined.

    You then prioritize your best ideas and create a low-resolution PROTOTYPE. The goal of the prototype is to create something that helps you learn more about your user and problem. It is very different from creating a prototype that takes six months and $1 million to build. It’s about doing things in hours and maybe days. A prototype can be a storyboard, a cardboard and duct-tape representation, a role-playing session, whatever. Lower resolution prototypes also better engage the imagination to help fill in gaps with new ideas. This phase really forces your team to deal with tough questions around feasibility, early.

    You then TEST your prototype with users. You aren’t testing your ideas to impress or to validate, but to learn. Failing is totally fine, as long as you learn from it and use it to evolve your problem statement and your solution.

    You iterate through these as often as you need, until you get to a point when you think you’ve got a solution ready to take forward. Through these phases, there is a set of specific d.thinking tools and rules you apply to move you forward.

    It’s actually kind of simple. And cheap. Doing this BEFORE product development increases:

    Customer focus
    # of compelling options
    Agreement on priorities
    Foresight on Viability issues
    Odds of success
  • A few years ago, five graduate students from different programs at Stanford enrolled in a design thinking class focused on delivering solutions for developing nations. Linus, Jane, Razmig, Rahul, and Nagunand were MBA students, computer science students, grad students. They were given a class project in which they were required to apply the specific methods of design thinking to come up with an innovative solution to a problem.

    The problem they were assigned was significant.
  • There are 20 million premature or low birth-weight babies born each year. Premature and low birth-weight babies are extremely delicate when born and most do not have ample body-fat or physical capabilities to maintain a proper body temperature. To these babies, the temperature of this room would feel like ice water poured onto their skin. This is a significant issue in developing countries where such babies are at extremely high risk and about 4 million of them die within the first 4 weeks of life.

    This is a problem worth getting passionate about.

    What kind of solution could these five students come up with to help these children?
  • Traditionally, premature babies are cared for in incubators in hospital nurseries. Each incubator costs about $25000. That’s a lot of money for a rural hospital in say, Nepal, to spend. The team concluded that they needed to design a cheaper incubator, one they could get to all of the hospitals. They spent a lot of time analyzing materials cost, studying manufacturing constraints, and gaming through how to provide an affordable solution for hospitals.

    But then they were reminded that in the design thinking process, you must always start with the user. So they decided they needed to go on a road trip.
  • For Spring Break, instead of heading to some beach somewhere, they went to Nepal. They toured hospitals and they spoke with nurses, and doctors and government workers. They noticed something. There actually didn’t seem to be a shortage of incubators. There seemed to be enough on hand.

    Then the doctors told them that most of the people in the country lived a day away from the nearest hospital. The students also realized their tour didn’t include any conversations with mothers or families. The team cancelled the remaining visits they had scheduled to hospitals and headed into the villages.

    They quickly found out that 80% of babies born in Nepal are born at home and many of the mothers could not travel for hours to get to a hospital after going through labor. Nor could their babies. And in most of these villages there was no electricity. So it didn’t matter how inexpensive the hospital’s incubator were– they wouldn’t be used because parents would not bring their babies to the hospital. And if you brought the incubators to the village, they wouldn’t work, because there was no electricity.

    This was their AHA moment. The original problem statement they defined was to “design a low cost incubator for rural hospitals”. Their new problem statement became: “help desperate parents in a rural villages keep their newborns warm”.

    After meeting with families & midwives, they gathered a long list of insights and needs to work from, they reframed the problem statement. They then entered the ideation stage of design thinking.
  • Working as a group, using specific d.thinking brainstorming tools and building off of each other’s ideas and insights, they went through extensive ideation sessions to come up with simple ideas for solutions.

    They realized they needed a solution that kept babies warm and was extremely cheap. It could not require electricity. It needed to be easily portable. It needed to be sanitary.

    They gathered various materials – sleeping bags, hot water bottles, baby dolls, duct tape, etc – and started creating what design thinkers call low-resolution prototypes to begin testing ideas. The purpose of their prototypes was to learn more about their user, to fail fast and early so they can get to the right solution. After many rounds of iteration and testing, they arrived at a solution.
  • The team formed a new company and launched the EMBRACE Infant warmer.

    The product has been highlighted by Wired, ABC, Forbes, and lots of mainstream press, as well as winning multiple awards.

    The product costs around half a percent of a traditional incubator.

    It is light and completely portable. It uses an insertable warmer utilizing a phase-change wax that can be warmed by hot water and can hold it’s temperature for up to 6 hours. It has no seams, making it easy to wash and sanitize. It can be carried by the mothers kangaroo style, much like how they carry their babies today.

    It is now shipping in India where they estimate it has saved more than 100 thousand lives. They are partnered with GE Healthcare who will be using their global distribution channels to get it to mothers who need it.

    Not only is the product profitable it is set to save millions of lives in the next few years.

    The team attributes their success to the specific process of design thinking.
  • Ankit Gupta and Akshay Kothari were two computer science students at Stanford who wanted to create an app. They enrolled in a design thinking class and immediately began applying the d.thinking process to define a product.

    At the time, lots of people were frustrated by the experience of getting news on devices. They talked to lots of people and did low-rez post-it’s on cardboard prototypes and tested them, then, because they were broke and didn’t have an office or lab, they did much of their development in cafes.

    They spent hours a day in cafes and tested their work with other people in the café every chance they got. They were doing 7 to 10 user tests a day, every day, through the entire development of the product, which gave them incredible feedback.

    Six weeks after starting the project and applying the d.thinking model, they founded a company and launched an app…

  • Their product was the Pulse News Reader. It’s a slick and seamless way to enjoy customized news content. It is one of the most popular news apps out there. It is available on Iphones, ipads, android devices, Kindles. It is in the Apple App Store “Hall of Fame”, was one of the top “paid” apps, was designated by TIME magazine as one of the top 50 iphone apps, and was shown off by Steve Jobs on stage for the launch of the Ipad.

    Both Ankit and Akshay credit their success to the design thinking process.

    To quote Ankit -- “It’s not about trying to come up with the one genius idea, but trying and failing at 100 other solutions before arriving at the best one.”
  • Another great example of design thinking comes from General Electric.

    Doug Dietz is a senior innovation architect at GE healthcare and a design thinking student.

    Doug was in charge of building state of the art MRI machines.
  • NPC 2014 North - From thought to action - Sachin Kelkar, Intel Software and Services Group

    1. 1. FROM THOUGHT TO ACTION
    2. 2. Today you will… • Learn what “design thinking” is • Learn how it has been successfully used in various industries • Learn to put D Thinking in Practice Intel Confidential
    3. 3. Intel Confidential
    4. 4. Intel Confidential ..design thinking.. ‘a human centered, creative, iterative and practical approach to finding the best ideas and ultimate solutions’
    5. 5. Source: Stanford University d.school, Creative Common License Flare Focus Build to Learn, Create and Iterate Intel Confidential
    6. 6. Examples
    7. 7. Intel Confidential Jane Chen Nagunand Murty Razmig Hovaghimian Linus Liang Rahul Panicker
    8. 8. Intel Confidential 20,000,000 Premature & Low Birth Weight Babies
    9. 9. Intel Confidential 13 $25,000
    10. 10. User Empathy & “Aha” moments. Intel Confidential
    11. 11. Intel Confidential Ideation and low resolution prototypes Test & Iteration
    12. 12. Intel Confidential The EMBRACE Infant Warmer Less than 1% the cost Thousands of lives saved
    13. 13. Intel Confidential Akshay KothariAnkit Gupta “Let’s build an app!”
    14. 14. Apple’s App Store “Hall of Fame” TIME magazine top 50 iPhone app Intel Confidential
    15. 15. Doug Dietz , innovation architect, GE Healthcare d.thinking coach @ Stanford Intel Confidential
    16. 16. Fantastic technology Intel Confidential
    17. 17. Fantastic technology Intel Confidential But more than 80% of children must be sedated before use.
    18. 18. Intel Confidential Studied users. Prototyped and iterated.
    19. 19. Intel Confidential
    20. 20. Now..Less than 10% of children are sedated New problem: Kids want to do it again ! *http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/15/opinion/kelley-creativity/index.html
    21. 21. Empathize Ideate Prototype Test Define 17 Focus Areas Investigated 2600+ Ideas Generated 70+ Usages Validated 6+ PoC/Apps Developed 3+ Patent Disclosures Filed Intel Confidential Design Thinking @ our group
    22. 22. User-Focused App Innovation Intel Confidential
    23. 23. Source: Stanford University. Creative Common License, Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported. Flare Focus d.thinking tools Be more human centered. Understand user’s needs Prototype everything! Test early. Test often Collaborate. Innovation is a team sport Have a bias toward action
    24. 24. Take-aways • Identify who your user is. Talk with them. • Establish a problem statement worth solving • Step away from powerpoint. Generate ideas in collaborative group settings • Be like Edison: Prototype cheaply, quickly, and often • Test your ideas early with users and iterate Intel Confidential 28
    25. 25. Additional Design Thinking resources There are many books and videos available for anyone who wishes to learn more about Design Thinking. Below are a few pointers to get you started, but we encourage you to explore on your own to find out what’s out there. Stanford’s d.school: • Stanford’s “Virtual Crash Course in Design Thinking”: http://dschool.stanford.edu/dgift/ (includes participant and facilitator guide for the gift giving exercise) Books: • Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking Toolkit for Managers, by Jeanne Liedtka & Tim Ogilvie • The Design of Business: Why Design Thinking is the Next Competitive Advantage by Roger L. Martin • Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation by Tim Brown TED Talks (Google TED Talk, speaker’s name, and name of video) • Tim Brown, “A Call for Design Thinking” • Doug Dietz, “Transforming Healthcare for Children and Their Families” • Jane Chen, “Jane Chen: A warm embrace that saves lives”

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