A Vision for Indigenous Evaluation | Nan Wehipeihana Keynote presentation at the 2013 AES Conference

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Indigenous evaluation is fundamentally about how you 'see' the world (worldview) and how we know things (epistemology) and the nature of reality (ontology).

To grow the space for Indigenous evaluation to thrive and flourish requires non-Indigenous evaluators to want to, be committed to, have a reason to see the world through alternate eyes, and do things differently.

So why should evaluators care and why might they want to see and do things differently. For reasons of:
(1) For reasons of social justice (Greene, House, Mertens)
(2) To do no harm and practice within an ethic of care
(3) For reasons related to multicultural validity (Kirkhart, La France, Nichols)

Nan put forward a framework for reflecting on evaluation practice and ways of working with Indigenous peoples. The framework invites evaluators to reflect on their evaluation practice as a way of increasing participation by Indigenous peoples in evaluation. The framework can also be used as a tool to reflection on practice with all evaluation participants.

The intellectual endeavor of decolonizing practice "has to set out ways to proceed through a colonizing world. It needs radical compassion that reaches out, that seeks collaboration and that is open to possibilities that can only be imagined as other things fall into place" (Linda Tuhiwai Smith, 2012, Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples, p.xii).

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  • To the indigenous peoples of this landTo the ‘traditional owners’ guardians of this land where we gather todayTo their traditional knowledge holders/ and to their ‘houses’ of learningTo all here today from near and far
  • A Vision for Indigenous Evaluation | Nan Wehipeihana Keynote presentation at the 2013 AES Conference

    1. 1. A Vision for Indigenous Evaluation Nan Wehipeihana Keynote Presentation Australasian Evaluation Society 2013 Conference 3 September, Brisbane, Australia
    2. 2. Ko Tararua te pae maunga Ko Ohau te awa Ko Tukorehe te marae Ko Ngati Tukorehe te iwi Tuku mihi ki nga kaitiaki o tenei wahi e noho mai nei ki nga tohunga me nga whare takuira ki a koutou katoa no nga hau e wha
    3. 3. Who am I? (Ko wai au?)
    4. 4. My motivation to do evaluation… Make a positive difference for Māori Surface Māori values and perspectives Tukorehe Marae Jan 2013, Wehipeihana whānau reunion
    5. 5. My values orientation in evaluation… Manaakitanga - An ethic of care - An ethic of responsibility Who I am How I see the world My evaluation practice Tukorehe Marae Jan 2013, Wehipeihana whānau reunion
    6. 6. I seek to use the tools and the discipline of evaluation To critique policy, programs and service provision by Government, by mainstream non-Māori organisation and by tribes and Māori organisation. To contribute to a more just, equitable and inclusive society My values orientation in evaluation…
    7. 7. Tutu meets Tatoo A vision of Indigenous Evaluation for AES Photo: Māori Television Photo: Bigstock
    8. 8. My conception of Indigenous Evaluation By Indigenous peoples For Indigenous peoples As Indigenous peoples Non Indigenous participation is by invitation No automatic or presumed right of participation Photographer: Sharon Hawke
    9. 9. So how do we get there? Paradigm shift Fundamentally about how you view the world Challenge For non-Indigenous Want to Have a reason to See the world differently Through ‘alternate’ eyes So why should I care – and how do I change? Photographer: Sharon Hawke
    10. 10. Why should I care? • Social justice – in the tradition of Greene (1997) House and Howe (2002) and Mertens (2008) • Ethic of care / do no harm – fundamental principle • Heart of our practice as evaluators – multi cultural validity (Kirkhart, 2005 & 2013)
    11. 11. How do I change? Western paradigm Indigenous paradigm Destination Journey Evaluator as expert Community as expert Power and control Evaluator in control – sharing of power – Indigenous control Paradigm shift Paradigm shift reflected in our practice, our ways of working …
    12. 12. How would we know things are on track?
    13. 13. Western imposed “You decide” Indigenous Self-determination “I decide”Invitational space Wehipeihana, N (2013) A vision for Indigenous evaluation presented at the AES Conference, 3 September, Brisbane
    14. 14. Western imposed “You decide” Indigenous Self-determination “I decide”Invitational space Consequences Good results For Canberra (VfM) For community Harm No change Ineffective Costly for taxpayers Costly for community Wehipeihana, N (2013) A vision for Indigenous evaluation presented at the AES Conference, 3 September, Brisbane
    15. 15. TO Western imposed “You decide” Indigenous Self-determination “I decide”Invitational space Consequences Good results For Canberra (VfM) For community Harm No change Ineffective Costly for taxpayers Costly for community Wehipeihana, N (2013) A vision for Indigenous evaluation presented at the AES Conference, 3 September, Brisbane
    16. 16. TO FOR Western imposed “You decide” Indigenous Self-determination “I decide”Invitational space Consequences Good results For Canberra (VfM) For community Harm No change Ineffective Costly for taxpayers Costly for community Wehipeihana, N (2013) A vision for Indigenous evaluation presented at the AES Conference, 3 September, Brisbane
    17. 17. TO FOR WITH Western imposed “You decide” Indigenous Self-determination “I decide”Invitational space Consequences Good results For Canberra (VfM) For community Harm No change Ineffective Costly for taxpayers Costly for community Wehipeihana, N (2013) A vision for Indigenous evaluation presented at the AES Conference, 3 September, Brisbane
    18. 18. TO FOR WITH BY Western imposed “You decide” Indigenous Self-determination “I decide”Invitational space Consequences Good results For Canberra (VfM) For community Harm No change Ineffective Costly for taxpayers Costly for community Wehipeihana, N (2013) A vision for Indigenous evaluation presented at the AES Conference, 3 September, Brisbane
    19. 19. TO FOR WITH BY AS Western imposed “You decide” Indigenous Self-determination “I decide”Invitational space Consequences Good results For Canberra (VfM) For community Harm No change Ineffective Costly for taxpayers Costly for community Wehipeihana, N (2013) A vision for Indigenous evaluation presented at the AES Conference, 3 September, Brisbane
    20. 20. Tutu meets Tatoo1 A vision of Indigenous Evaluation for AES Photo: Māori Television Photo: Bigstock
    21. 21. Ihi Frenzy Photo: Māori Television Photo: Royal NZ Ballet, Photographer Ross Brown
    22. 22. Worlds Brilliantly Balanced Photo: Mana Magazine 2001, Photographer Kerry Grant
    23. 23. Worlds Brilliantly Balanced Photo: Mana Magazine 2001, Photographer Kerry Grant
    24. 24. Worlds Brilliantly Balanced Photo: Mana Magazine 2001, Photographer Kerry Grant
    25. 25. Acknowledgements • To my colleagues Kate McKegg, Judy Oakden and Julian King • To Lois-ellin Datta • To my daughters Teia and Kahiwa Sebire Nan Wehipeihana nan@kinnect.co.nz nan.wehipeihana@gmail.com

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