The Haworth Brothers’War
The Haworth BrothersWilliam 1837-1864David 1842-1925Isaac 1846-1914John 1848-1907
The Haworth family had been in America along time. The original immigrant, GeorgeHaworth arrived in Philadelphia about1699...
Haworth’s Bend
Holston RiverIndian Cave Ferry House
Haworth Cemetery near the site of thehomestead.The remnants of Haworth Road which ran infront of the homestead.
LostCreekChurchThe Haworth brothers’ great grandparents werefounding members of the Lost Creek Friends Churchwhich is stil...
David Haworth kept adiary of hisexperiences duringthe Civil War.He mentions Mr.Brownlow in severalentries.October 17, 1862...
Although Tennessee was the laststate to join the Confederacy and, fora time even declared itself anindependent republic to...
Confederate Conscription lawThe passage of the Confederate Conscription Law in April of 1862 brought the issue to a head.T...
Cumberland Gap duringUnion OccupationDavid and his brothers were just one part ofan amazing exodus. Estimates vary but it ...
The three oldest Haworth boys enlisted.Although the compiled service records saythat they enlisted on 10 Feb 1862, a journ...
“Volunteers” This mass exodus of potential recruitsangered the Tennessee ConfederateGovernment no end. After firstthreaten...
Battle of ResacaMay 13-15, 1864
Resaca BattlefieldMay 13, 1864We marched through SnakeCreek gap. Formed our brigade in lineof battle. Moved up through the...
The last FullMeasure ofdevotionChattanooga NationalCemeteryChattanooga, Tennessee
Post War Life•The father of the brothers,William, died in 1870.•Sometime around 1871 - 1873, the three brotherstook their ...
John Haworth FamilyMirabile, Missouricirca 1886circa 1886
Haworth Brothers War
Haworth Brothers War
Haworth Brothers War
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Haworth Brothers War

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Story of the Civil War experience of my 2nd great grandfather John L. Haworth and his 3 brothers. All served the Union in the 3rd Tennessee Infantry, Co. "K".

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  • Because the Haworth property was located in a bend in the Holston River and surrounded by it on three sides, it became known locally as Haworth’s Bend.
  • David and his brothers were just one part of an amazing exodus. Estimates vary but it is generally conceded that between 20,000 and 30,000 men slipped out of East Tennessee and made their way into Kentucky to escape conscription in the Confederate army or certain prison. Not all were as lucky as the Haworth boys. One group of 400 young men and boys from the New Market area were captured just 40 miles from home by a regiment of East Tennessee Confederate Cavalry. They were sent to prison.2
  • Haworth Brothers War

    1. 1. The Haworth Brothers’War
    2. 2. The Haworth BrothersWilliam 1837-1864David 1842-1925Isaac 1846-1914John 1848-1907
    3. 3. The Haworth family had been in America along time. The original immigrant, GeorgeHaworth arrived in Philadelphia about1699.He was a member of the Society of Friends orQuakers. Over the years the Haworthsmigrated along with the rest of the nation.Quakers tended to migrate in small groupsestablishing new Quaker meetings as themoved. In 1790, the family was living inNorth Carolina. Richard Haworth, John’sgreat grandfather loaded his large family onflatboats and followed the Holston River totheir new home in what would becomeJefferson County, Tennessee.Haworth History
    4. 4. Haworth’s Bend
    5. 5. Holston RiverIndian Cave Ferry House
    6. 6. Haworth Cemetery near the site of thehomestead.The remnants of Haworth Road which ran infront of the homestead.
    7. 7. LostCreekChurchThe Haworth brothers’ great grandparents werefounding members of the Lost Creek Friends Churchwhich is still in operation today. The original buildingwas burned during the Civil War but was rebuilt usingsome of the original timbers. The extensive adjacentgraveyard was also destroyed.In 1824, according to Quaker records, thebrothers’ father William was “disowned” bythe church for fighting. I haven’t found anymention in the record about him beingreinstated to the meeting.
    8. 8. David Haworth kept adiary of hisexperiences duringthe Civil War.He mentions Mr.Brownlow in severalentries.October 17, 1862“Then we got on a streetcar and he took us to hisfather’s house. (Old ParsonBrownlow) where we stayedall night. The old parsonseemed as glad to see us as ifwe had been his own boys. Heknew my father back in theearly days around NewMarket, in east Tennessee.”“For more than two years the Federal Goverment wasejected from East Tennessee. Union citizens weredisarmed -- arrested without warrant, and for allegedmilitary offences imprisoned at the pleasure of pettymilitary tyrants in violation of all law, -- forced totake oaths against their consciences and in derogationof their allegiance to the United States, -- taxed withillegal costs to support corrupt officials -- theirproperty seized for public and for individual uses.Their fields were laid waste; in some instances,houses were burned over the heads of families as apunishment for their loyalty, and in other instances,not a few men patriotically sealed their devotion totheir country with their life-blood, either butcheredby a lawless soldierly or officially murdered by amilitary court.” ~William G. BrownlowUnion Loyalists inConfederate TennesseeWilliam G. Brownlow, John Baxter, et al. toAbraham Lincoln, Tuesday, February 09, 1864(Situation in East Tennessee)The Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress
    9. 9. Although Tennessee was the laststate to join the Confederacy and, fora time even declared itself anindependent republic to avoid joiningthe South, the political power of thewestern counties eventually prevailedand Tennessee took up the cause ofthe Confederacy. This left the Unionsympathizers in East Tennessee in aprecarious position. They had nogeographical connection with thenorthern states and all their bestroutes of communication, the riversand railroads, ran to the south. TheQuakers were especially suspectbecause of their refusal to join in thegeneral war hysteria and their historicopposition to slavery.
    10. 10. Confederate Conscription lawThe passage of the Confederate Conscription Law in April of 1862 brought the issue to a head.To escape conscription, young men aged 18-35 would have flee their homes in East Tennessee.Instead of turning themselves in as the poster above suggests, they would travel secretly overthe Blue Ridge Mountains to Kentucky where the nearest Union recruiting stations werelocated.
    11. 11. Cumberland Gap duringUnion OccupationDavid and his brothers were just one part ofan amazing exodus. Estimates vary but it isgenerally conceded that between 20,000 and30,000 men slipped out of East Tennessee andmade their way through the Cumberland Gapinto Kentucky to escape conscription in theConfederate army or certain prison.Not all were as lucky as the Haworth boys.One group of 400 young men and boys fromthe New Market area were captured just 40miles from home by a regiment of EastTennessee Confederate Cavalry. They weresent to prison.
    12. 12. The three oldest Haworth boys enlisted.Although the compiled service records saythat they enlisted on 10 Feb 1862, a journalkept by David Haworth puts the date as 14April 1862. As the boys had to travel atnight, on foot. over mountains terrain, itseems more likely that the trip occurred inthe spring rather than mid-winter.The youngestbrother, John wasinitially leftbehind, possiblybecause of his age.However he laterjoined an EastTennessee cavalryunit andeventuallytransferred intothe ThirdTennesseeInfantry to be withhis brothers.
    13. 13. “Volunteers” This mass exodus of potential recruitsangered the Tennessee ConfederateGovernment no end. After firstthreatening prison, the officials nextoffered amnesty. On April 23, 1862 Col.William Churchwell, Provost Marshal,issued a proclamation urging those whohad left to return within thirty days.After that date, the colonel declared,“their wives and children would be sentto them in Kentucky, or beyondConfederate lines, at their ownexpense.”3 Whether this was everapplied to the remaining Haworthfamily is unknown but ConfederateTennessee could not abide a family withfour sons in the Union Army and theywere eventually forced out of theirhome, moving to Illinois to join otherfamily members.
    14. 14. Battle of ResacaMay 13-15, 1864
    15. 15. Resaca BattlefieldMay 13, 1864We marched through SnakeCreek gap. Formed our brigade in lineof battle. Moved up through the timberand took a position in the rear of the14th Army Corps.Pretty heavy fighting going on inthe front all night. Some went to therear the next morning to make somecoffee. General (Henry Moses) Judahwas in command of our brigade thatday. He was drunk.May 14, 1864At ten o’clock we were ordered to getinto line. Then to fix bayonets and charge.We passed through the troops in front of usand marched on the main rebel fort in frontof us. We had to cross a little valley andCamp Creek was close to the fort. There hadbeen some small timber on the banks of thecreek.Captain William C. Haworth was atthe head of his company leading them in thecharge. Just at the edge of the creek he wasshot in the head with a minie ball and fellwith part of his body in the Creek. Lieut.Gamble saw his body after he was shot.The rebels had cut out all of thatand railed in the creek so we couldhardly get by. Some of us got over butsoon had to come back. I believe that Iwould have walked across that littlefield on our dead and wounded.That night Lieut. Gamble and mybrother I.E. Haworth slipped in and gotmy brother’s body and carried it out andtook the end of a cracker box, cut hisname, rank and number of his regimentand dug a grave. Rolled him in his blanketand buried him.David recorded in his diary thebattle that killed one brother andwounded the remaining three.
    16. 16. The last FullMeasure ofdevotionChattanooga NationalCemeteryChattanooga, Tennessee
    17. 17. Post War Life•The father of the brothers,William, died in 1870.•Sometime around 1871 - 1873, the three brotherstook their widowed mother and moved theirfamilies to Caldwell County, Missouri.•Around 1880, David and John moved again toLawrence County, Missouri.•All three men had life-long difficulties because oftheir wounds, but married, raised large familiesand died peacefully in old age.
    18. 18. John Haworth FamilyMirabile, Missouricirca 1886circa 1886

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