Towards an Education that is International<br />29thseptember<br />2ndoctober 2011<br />Naira Hamdy<br />Taaleem Dubai <br />
Aim<br />For participants to develop strategies to foster and maintain international-mindedness in their schools.<br />
The people chosen for have origins in one country or culture, but spent most of their life, and became well-known, in a di...
Use Venn diagrams to demonstrate the similarities and differences between-<br />Mono-cultural<br /><ul><li> Multicultural
 International</li></li></ul><li>The PYP promotes <br />international mindedness <br />in order to develop<br />inquiring,...
A national School<br />An international school<br />An international standard of education<br />An international education...
    National School<br />Offers the curriculum of the country that it is in, or represents.<br />
International Schools<br />Usually established to provide an education for expatriate students living outside their home c...
International Schools<br />Often established to deliver a curriculum from another country, (eg: America, Britain or Singap...
International Schools<br />The curriculum is often tailored to meet a specific audience, especially those who will return ...
International Schools<br />Some international schools choose a varied curriculum, delivered by teachers from diverse educa...
An International Standard of Education<br />A term used to describe a school which may, for example <br />Teach a franchis...
An International education is:<br />NOT teaching groups of students of different nationalities<br />NOT studying the histo...
The PYP promotes <br />international mindedness <br />in order to develop<br />inquiring, knowledgeable and caring people ...
What will international mindedness look like in my classroom/school and in my students? <br />In groups consider -<br />
The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to ...
IB Learner Profile<br />Inquirers<br />Knowledgeable<br />Thinkers<br />Communicators<br />Principled<br />Open-minded<br ...
AppreciationCommitment<br />Confidence<br />        Co-operation<br />Creativity<br />        Curiosity<br />Empathy<br />...
Towards an Education that is International<br />
Inquiry is an expression of our curiosity.It leads us, as we question and wonder, beyond our present understanding.<br />T...
Your journey to UAE:<br />The place travelled from<br />	(district, if from UAE, or city, town, village and country)<br />...
Place artefacts on table one person at a time.<br />Save the Last Word for Me<br />Everyone, except the person who placed ...
age       race       gender<br />nationality       education       countries/regions<br />religion       class       sexua...
Design a personal Map.<br />A visual portrait  of the different aspects of your own cultural identities.<br />Cultural Ide...
Please provide the following information:<br />Name / Position at school<br />Nationalities represented in your school – s...
.<br />Homework<br />Reading articles<br />See you tomorrow!<br />
Personal Artefacts<br />Create Index cards with a title and a caption for Artefact Museum<br />Mark your attendance<br />S...
Share your maps at your table group.<br />Personal Cultural Identities Maps<br />
What is culture?<br />Consensus Board<br />Person 1<br />Person 2<br />Definition of culture<br />Person 3<br />Person 4<b...
What is culture?<br />PYP Workshop Buenos Aires<br />
Culture is a Set of Tangible and Intangible<br />Values		Beliefs	       Behaviours	Traditions<br />in constant change due ...
What is culture?<br />“Culture is the shared patterns that set the tone, character, and quality of people’s lives”<br />- ...
Culture is…<br />“...the values, symbols, interpretations, and perspectives held by a group of people.”<br />- Banks<br />
“…a design for living-ways of acting, believing and valuing”<br />“…a shared set of ideas, behaviours, discourses, and att...
“…a thought collective”<br />“…a group of people who come to think in similar ways through sustained interaction and excha...
National Identity Charts<br />
GOOD Morning<br />
What’s going on here?<br />
Diamond Ranking<br />Pairs<br />Each pair selects 9 items, in relation to <br />	the criteria.<br />Each pair ranks the it...
International Curriculum Framework<br />
When does national identity change from a celebration to a promotion of stereotypes?<br />Debate<br />
Who You Are<br />“Today Miss McIntyre, our guidance counsellor, said, <br />“You have to decide who you are and where you’...
Only … maybe not …<br />I could do that about me too, of course.  There are labels that partly fit. I too am the child of ...
But I just might be policewoman, if I really wanted to.  Except…what about my lighthouse?<br />Right now I could be anybod...
Books on Personal Cultural Identities<br />
Neighbour map<br />Photograph memoir <br />Sense of place unit<br />Examples of Ways to explore cultural identity<br />
Possible activity prompts to help develop Personal Cultural Identities<br />1. Each of us is unique.  Imagine two boxes.  ...
3. Are you a member of any group?  Think of a group you like belonging to..  Be ready to speak for one minute about your g...
A visitor from another country is staying at your home.  While you are watching the news together they show people engaged...
Celebration Photo charts<br />Artefact displays – favourite belongings and what does this say about you<br />Documenting s...
Read ‘     ’ Article – page        of workbook<br />Connect to own experiences <br />Exit card<br />One connection and one...
Name Badge<br />Choose a cultural symbol that is significant to your cultural identities and add to your name badge<br />O...
“A third culture kid (TCK) is a person who has <br />spent a significant part of his or her developmental <br />years outs...
Adaptability versus a lack of true cultural balance<br />Blending in versus defining their differences<br />Less versus mo...
Window of Opportunity<br />Ref:  David C. Pollock & Ruth E. Van Reken<br />
Connections that you made to your own experience<br />Contradictions<br />“Fourth Culture Kids”<br />
Primarily in conscious awareness<br />Primarily out of conscious awareness<br />Iceberg Concept of Culture<br />Adapted fr...
Primarily n conscious awareness<br />Primarily out of conscious awareness <br />Cuisine, Dance, Drama, Dress, <br />Fine A...
self
past and future
beauty
space
justice
cleanliness
status and status mobility
Definitions such as those of:
sin
sanity and insanity
Notions such as those of:
childhood
adolescence
adulthood
marriage
family
cultural identity
talk and silence
modesty
leadership
Non-verbal communication such as:
eye contact
facial expressions
body language
Patterns such as those of:
superior/subordinate relations
group decision making
handling emotions
conversation in different contexts</li></li></ul><li>Definition:<br />The understanding that knowledge <br />is not constr...
Draw a map of the world from your group’s selected perspective. <br />Post maps outside the room<br />Carousel activity – ...
Read selected books and record the issues being raised throughout the books.<br />Examples of units on global issues<br />...
POI<br />Units of inquiry<br />Children’s Literature<br />Items to share<br />Please bring<br />
School culture : 4 parts.<br />- 10 min individual reading<br />-10 min sharing common understanding.<br />All 1  together...
Compass Point <br />E – Exciting – what have you found exciting about difficult issues?<br />W – Worrisome – what do you f...
Gebel, Doris (2006)<br />Crossing Boundaries with Children’s Books<br />Scarecrow Press<br />ISBN 0-8108-5203-9<br />Book ...
From your experiences of UAE, list global issues that might be significant to include in a curriculum that is internationa...
How does the profile relate to a curriculum that is international?<br />Review your diamond ranking chart and compare to t...
“The PYP believes that international education<br />must extend beyond intellectual attainment to <br />include not only r...
Learners constructing meanings<br />
Reflect <br />Choose<br />Act<br />
“The action component of the PYP involves service <br />in the widest sense of the word: service to fellow-<br />students,...
“Effective action does not need to be grandiose. On the <br />contrary, it begins at the most immediate and basic level: i...
“The PYP believes not only that it is possible for <br />students to identify appropriate actions but also <br />that we h...
“The PYP recognizes the problems inherent in advocating <br />action and the importance of presenting a balanced viewpoint...
International Curriculum Framework<br />
Reviewing a POI in relation to the framework of a curriculum that is international.<br />On the table provided:<br />Revie...
Share your connections and thoughts about the homework article.<br />Share what you are doing in your school to explore th...
Using your experience and by analysing the newspapers and other materials, determine the issues facing UAE as defined with...
Aesthetic<br />Political<br />Social<br />Economic<br />Values & Beliefs<br />Historical context<br />Geographical context...
From your work on Begler’s world culture organizer and your field trip experiences:<br />As a group choose an issue on UAE...
Choose a unit you would like to explore in more depth from an international perspective.<br />Revise the unit.<br />Begler...
Acceptance <br />&<br />Respect<br />Appreciation<br />& <br />Valuing<br />Intercultural competence<br />Ethnocentrism<br...
Do we know Each other<br />Susan  Anita<br />Gary<br />Imelda<br />Amani<br />Sara<br />Veyan<br />Marilyn<br />
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  • I often do this as a think, pair, share and then start a list of strategies that we can model and add to throughout the workshop.
  • Towards an education final

    1. 1. Towards an Education that is International<br />29thseptember<br />2ndoctober 2011<br />Naira Hamdy<br />Taaleem Dubai <br />
    2. 2. Aim<br />For participants to develop strategies to foster and maintain international-mindedness in their schools.<br />
    3. 3. The people chosen for have origins in one country or culture, but spent most of their life, and became well-known, in a different setting.<br />
    4. 4. Use Venn diagrams to demonstrate the similarities and differences between-<br />Mono-cultural<br /><ul><li> Multicultural
    5. 5. International</li></li></ul><li>The PYP promotes <br />international mindedness <br />in order to develop<br />inquiring, knowledgeable and caring people who help create a better and more peaceful world through <br />intercultural understanding <br />and respect.<br />Central Idea<br />
    6. 6. A national School<br />An international school<br />An international standard of education<br />An international education?<br />What is:<br />
    7. 7. National School<br />Offers the curriculum of the country that it is in, or represents.<br />
    8. 8. International Schools<br />Usually established to provide an education for expatriate students living outside their home country.<br />
    9. 9. International Schools<br />Often established to deliver a curriculum from another country, (eg: America, Britain or Singapore) using teachers predominantly from this home country.<br />
    10. 10. International Schools<br />The curriculum is often tailored to meet a specific audience, especially those who will return to the home country at some time during their education.<br />
    11. 11. International Schools<br />Some international schools choose a varied curriculum, delivered by teachers from diverse educational and cultural backgrounds.<br />
    12. 12. An International Standard of Education<br />A term used to describe a school which may, for example <br />Teach a franchised/licensed program from overseas, <br />Teach in English or another foreign language (taught by native-speaking teachers) <br />Uses resources and equipment brought from overseas<br />
    13. 13. An International education is:<br />NOT teaching groups of students of different nationalities<br />NOT studying the history, geography and <br /> customs of other countries<br />NOT arranging for foreign exchanges<br />NOT having a strong foreign languages <br /> department.<br />… though each of these might help<br /> - Prof. George Walker, <br />former Director General, IBO<br />
    14. 14. The PYP promotes <br />international mindedness <br />in order to develop<br />inquiring, knowledgeable and caring people who help create a better and more peaceful world through <br />intercultural understanding <br />and respect.<br />Central Idea<br />
    15. 15. What will international mindedness look like in my classroom/school and in my students? <br />In groups consider -<br />
    16. 16. The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.<br />To this end the IBO works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.<br />These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.<br />IBO Mission Statement<br />
    17. 17. IB Learner Profile<br />Inquirers<br />Knowledgeable<br />Thinkers<br />Communicators<br />Principled<br />Open-minded<br />Caring<br />Risk-takers<br />Balanced <br />Reflective<br />
    18. 18. AppreciationCommitment<br />Confidence<br /> Co-operation<br />Creativity<br /> Curiosity<br />Empathy<br />Enthusiasm<br />Independence<br />Integrity<br />Respect<br /> Tolerance<br />Student Attitudes<br />
    19. 19.
    20. 20. Towards an Education that is International<br />
    21. 21. Inquiry is an expression of our curiosity.It leads us, as we question and wonder, beyond our present understanding.<br />The inquiry stance is:<br />Open<br /> Welcoming ideas, even conflicting ones<br />Wondering<br /> Being playful with words and ideas<br />Committed<br /> Actively involved <br />Engaging of others<br /> Building on each others’ utterances- agreeing/disagreeing with own ideas and ideas of others- reshaping understandings/<br /> misunderstandings<br />Supportive of own and others’ ideas<br /> Offering evidence and opinions- constructing from own understanding<br />
    22. 22. Your journey to UAE:<br />The place travelled from<br /> (district, if from UAE, or city, town, village and country)<br />The route taken and means of transport<br />Approximate cost of journey<br />Length of journey<br />A frustration or a surprise during the journey<br />Sharing stories<br />
    23. 23. Place artefacts on table one person at a time.<br />Save the Last Word for Me<br />Everyone, except the person who placed the artefacts, discusses what they think these objects reflect about the person’s cultural identities.<br />Person gets the last word and shares how these objects reflect their cultural identity.<br />Personal Artefacts<br />
    24. 24. age race gender<br />nationality education countries/regions<br />religion class sexuality<br />languages ethnicity urban/rural/suburban<br />physical ability family structure<br />Ourselves as Cultural Beings<br />
    25. 25. Design a personal Map.<br />A visual portrait of the different aspects of your own cultural identities.<br />Cultural Identity Maps<br />
    26. 26. Please provide the following information:<br />Name / Position at school<br />Nationalities represented in your school – student and teacher population.<br />Places you have lived<br />Nationality<br />Key things we should know about your home country<br />What you have brought to share.<br />Exit Card<br />
    27. 27. .<br />Homework<br />Reading articles<br />See you tomorrow!<br />
    28. 28. Personal Artefacts<br />Create Index cards with a title and a caption for Artefact Museum<br />Mark your attendance<br />Sign in with what you have brought on white board<br />Welcome to Day 2<br />
    29. 29. Share your maps at your table group.<br />Personal Cultural Identities Maps<br />
    30. 30. What is culture?<br />Consensus Board<br />Person 1<br />Person 2<br />Definition of culture<br />Person 3<br />Person 4<br />
    31. 31. What is culture?<br />PYP Workshop Buenos Aires<br />
    32. 32. Culture is a Set of Tangible and Intangible<br />Values Beliefs Behaviours Traditions<br />in constant change due to connections with other cultures as society adapts to<br /> Aesthetic Political Economical Social<br />transformations within a geographical and historical context all of which is transmitted from one generation to the next.<br />C U L T U R E I S :<br />PYP Workshop Buenos Aires<br />
    33. 33. What is culture?<br />“Culture is the shared patterns that set the tone, character, and quality of people’s lives”<br />- Geertz<br />
    34. 34. Culture is…<br />“...the values, symbols, interpretations, and perspectives held by a group of people.”<br />- Banks<br />
    35. 35. “…a design for living-ways of acting, believing and valuing”<br />“…a shared set of ideas, behaviours, discourses, and attitudes which internally and externally define a social group.”<br />- Shannon<br />
    36. 36. “…a thought collective”<br />“…a group of people who come to think in similar ways through sustained interaction and exchange of ideas, they create a history and a way of thinking and talking together.”<br />- Fleck<br />
    37. 37. National Identity Charts<br />
    38. 38. GOOD Morning<br />
    39. 39. What’s going on here?<br />
    40. 40. Diamond Ranking<br />Pairs<br />Each pair selects 9 items, in relation to <br /> the criteria.<br />Each pair ranks the items in layout as above <br /> with the most ‘valued’ item, in relation to the <br /> criteria, at the top and the least ‘valued’ at the bottom.<br />Each pair links up with another pair and shares <br /> their own rankings with the other.<br />Fours<br />Each group of four creates a new diamond from the items using the same criteria.<br />Reflection<br />At first, what were the differences and similarities between the two diamonds?<br />In developing a third diamond, how did your group arrive at consensus?<br />Was it hard or easy to reach consensus? <br />Why do you think that was?<br />Did everyone feel that their ideas were listened to?<br />
    41. 41. International Curriculum Framework<br />
    42. 42. When does national identity change from a celebration to a promotion of stereotypes?<br />Debate<br />
    43. 43. Who You Are<br />“Today Miss McIntyre, our guidance counsellor, said, <br />“You have to decide who you are and where you’re going.”<br />Sounds simple. Just decide. I think it is simple for Emily. <br />She’s Emily Blair, daughter of the Manager of the Royal Bank, member of the Presbyterian Church, <br />high achiever in school, sister of Louisa. <br />And she knows where she’s going – or thinks she does. She wants to teach Grade One. She’s out of her mind. <br />Jean Little (1986) Hey World, Here I Am! (pp.86-87)<br />
    44. 44. Only … maybe not …<br />I could do that about me too, of course. There are labels that partly fit. I too am the child of my parents, except I’m beginning to see that Mother and Dad are not just my parents, the way I used to think. They are separate people with thoughts of their own. <br />Sometimes they seem like strangers..<br /> I’d like to teach Grade Five but I want to write a symphony and live in a lighthouse and fly an airplane. I’d like to be a policewoman and I’ve thought about being a nun. <br />I think I’ll write books…I sound like a little kid.<br />There are so many roads, though. I can’t write a symphony, I know that. And I’m pretty sure I’d never make it as a nun. <br />
    45. 45. But I just might be policewoman, if I really wanted to. Except…what about my lighthouse?<br />Right now I could be anybody, Miss McIntyre. Can’t you understand that? I could be anybody at all.<br />I’m not ready to choose and besides, I’m choosing more than one road. I’m putting myself together, Miss McIntyre. <br />But it is like a jigsaw puzzle. I keep on finding new pieces.<br />If you were once a puzzle, you soon found the edge pieces and fitted yourself inside. There is no edge to me yet. <br />I hope the picture turns out to be worth the work. I hope I never discover an edge.”<br />
    46. 46. Books on Personal Cultural Identities<br />
    47. 47. Neighbour map<br />Photograph memoir <br />Sense of place unit<br />Examples of Ways to explore cultural identity<br />
    48. 48. Possible activity prompts to help develop Personal Cultural Identities<br />1. Each of us is unique. Imagine two boxes. One has a label with your name on it, the other says ‘Not you’. List ten things you would put in the box with your name on and ten things in the other box labelled ‘Not you’.<br />2. Draw two large boxes. In one box write or draw ways that you are like your mother. In the other write or draw ways you are like your father. Outside the boxes write or draw ways you are different from both your parents.<br />
    49. 49. 3. Are you a member of any group? Think of a group you like belonging to.. Be ready to speak for one minute about your group. OR create a map of the groups you belong to and identify why you like being in these groups.<br />
    50. 50. A visitor from another country is staying at your home. While you are watching the news together they show people engaged in custom very specific to your culture. You decide the activity. How will you explain this to your visitor? What other activities or customs in your culture might seem strange to him or her?<br />5. Make a list of the traditions that your family follows. Which is your favourite? Do you have a least favourite? Which traditions do you think you will carry on if you have a family of your own someday? Which ones, if any, do you think you might not carry on someday? <br />
    51. 51. Celebration Photo charts<br />Artefact displays – favourite belongings and what does this say about you<br />Documenting significant events in their lives – stories, cartoons, photographs <br />Mapping significant people in their lives<br />Timeline of significant events<br />Culture in your cupboard<br />Other examples<br />
    52. 52. Read ‘ ’ Article – page of workbook<br />Connect to own experiences <br />Exit card<br />One connection and one tension from today<br />Homework<br />
    53. 53. Name Badge<br />Choose a cultural symbol that is significant to your cultural identities and add to your name badge<br />On Map Card<br />Retrieve card from map<br />Write about: What is the attitude towards teachers in the culture in which you work?<br />Share at your table and re-post.<br />Welcome to Day 3!<br />
    54. 54. “A third culture kid (TCK) is a person who has <br />spent a significant part of his or her developmental <br />years outside the parents’ culture. <br />The TCK builds relationships to all of the cultures, <br />while not having full ownership in any.<br />Although elements from each culture are <br />assimilated into the TCK’s life experience, the <br />sense of belonging is in relationship to others of a <br />similar background.”<br />(The TCK Profile, Interaction Inc 1989)<br />TCKs<br />
    55. 55. Adaptability versus a lack of true cultural balance<br />Blending in versus defining their differences<br />Less versus more prejudice<br />Importance of now versus delusion of choice<br />Appreciative versus mistrustful of authority<br />Real versus perceived arrogance<br />TCKs<br />
    56. 56. Window of Opportunity<br />Ref: David C. Pollock & Ruth E. Van Reken<br />
    57. 57. Connections that you made to your own experience<br />Contradictions<br />“Fourth Culture Kids”<br />
    58. 58. Primarily in conscious awareness<br />Primarily out of conscious awareness<br />Iceberg Concept of Culture<br />Adapted from: <br />The Iceberg Concept of Culture model in Hapgood and Fennes (1997)<br />
    59. 59. Primarily n conscious awareness<br />Primarily out of conscious awareness <br />Cuisine, Dance, Drama, Dress, <br />Fine Art, Games, Literature & Music<br />Examples:<br /><ul><li>Conceptions such as those of:
    60. 60. self
    61. 61. past and future
    62. 62. beauty
    63. 63. space
    64. 64. justice
    65. 65. cleanliness
    66. 66. status and status mobility
    67. 67. Definitions such as those of:
    68. 68. sin
    69. 69. sanity and insanity
    70. 70. Notions such as those of:
    71. 71. childhood
    72. 72. adolescence
    73. 73. adulthood
    74. 74. marriage
    75. 75. family
    76. 76. cultural identity
    77. 77. talk and silence
    78. 78. modesty
    79. 79. leadership
    80. 80. Non-verbal communication such as:
    81. 81. eye contact
    82. 82. facial expressions
    83. 83. body language
    84. 84. Patterns such as those of:
    85. 85. superior/subordinate relations
    86. 86. group decision making
    87. 87. handling emotions
    88. 88. conversation in different contexts</li></li></ul><li>Definition:<br />The understanding that knowledge <br />is not constructed only from the<br />perspective of a particular discipline, <br />individual or group.<br />Examples of related concepts: <br />subjectivity, fact, opinion, bias,<br />prejudice, empathy<br />Key question: What are the points of view?<br />Perspective<br />
    89. 89.
    90. 90.
    91. 91. Draw a map of the world from your group’s selected perspective. <br />Post maps outside the room<br />Carousel activity – can you determine the perspective?<br />Published Maps<br />What is the perspective offered by each map? How does each map alter your perspective of the world?<br />Drawing Maps<br />
    92. 92. Read selected books and record the issues being raised throughout the books.<br />Examples of units on global issues<br />Raising Global Issues<br />
    93. 93. POI<br />Units of inquiry<br />Children’s Literature<br />Items to share<br />Please bring<br />
    94. 94. School culture : 4 parts.<br />- 10 min individual reading<br />-10 min sharing common understanding.<br />All 1 together and all 2 together<br />In the group of 4, one person speaks ; the other listen<br />Each one has 5 min to speak and 5 min to answer questions <br />Jigsaw<br />
    95. 95. Compass Point <br />E – Exciting – what have you found exciting about difficult issues?<br />W – Worrisome – what do you find worrisome about dealing with difficult issues?<br />N – Need - What do I need to know about these issues?<br />S – Suggestions I have for moving forward on this.<br />Sharing ideas<br />
    96. 96. Gebel, Doris (2006)<br />Crossing Boundaries with Children’s Books<br />Scarecrow Press<br />ISBN 0-8108-5203-9<br />Book reference<br />
    97. 97. From your experiences of UAE, list global issues that might be significant to include in a curriculum that is international.<br />Place an issue on a post-it note and add to the chart provided.<br />
    98. 98. How does the profile relate to a curriculum that is international?<br />Review your diamond ranking chart and compare to the learner profile.<br />IB Learner Profile<br />
    99. 99. “The PYP believes that international education<br />must extend beyond intellectual attainment to <br />include not only responsible attitudes but also <br />thoughtful and appropriate action.”<br />“The PYP believes that every student, every <br />year, has the right and the duty to be involved in <br />such action. …the PYP advocates a cycle of <br />involvement which provides students with <br />opportunities to engage in meaningful action.”<br />p.37, IBO(2000)<br />Action: How do we want the students to act?<br />
    100. 100. Learners constructing meanings<br />
    101. 101. Reflect <br />Choose<br />Act<br />
    102. 102. “The action component of the PYP involves service <br />in the widest sense of the word: service to fellow-<br />students, to the staff and to the community. <br />Through such service, students are able to grow <br />both socially and personally, developing skills such <br />as cooperation, problem-solving, conflict resolution <br />and creative and critical thinking. These actions <br />are, moreover, ways in which the students exhibit <br />their commitment to the attitudes that we seek to <br />engender within the PYP classroom.”<br />p.37, IBO(2000)<br />Action: How do we want the students to act?<br />
    103. 103. “Effective action does not need to be grandiose. On the <br />contrary, it begins at the most immediate and basic level: in <br />the family, in the classroom, in the hallways and in the <br />playground. <br />Even very young children can have strong feelings about <br />fairness and justice and we, as educators, can facilitate <br />positive expressions of these opinions. <br />The PYP has chosen to do so by identifying responsibility as <br />one of the key concepts driving the curriculum and by <br />including the question “What is our responsibility?” as a <br />key question. ”<br />p.37, IBO(2000)<br />Action: How do we want the students to act?<br />
    104. 104. “The PYP believes not only that it is possible for <br />students to identify appropriate actions but also <br />that we have a responsibility to enable them to <br />choose their actions carefully, to facilitate these <br />actions and to encourage them to reflect on the <br />actions they undertake. This is viewed as an <br />important part of students’ active participation in <br />their own learning.”<br />p.38, IBO(2000)<br />Action: How do we want the students to act?<br />
    105. 105. “The PYP recognizes the problems inherent in advocating <br />action and the importance of presenting a balanced viewpoint. <br />Voluntary action must remain precisely this, if we truly <br />believe in the values we advocate. Furthermore , we must <br />remember that today’s complex issues do not often suggest <br />simple or self-evident solutions and that inaction is also a <br />legitimate choice; indeed sometimes, inaction may be the best <br />choice. Each school should develop its own action component <br />based on the needs of its students and community.”<br />p.38, IBO(2000)<br />Action:How do we want the students to act?<br />
    106. 106.
    107. 107. International Curriculum Framework<br />
    108. 108. Reviewing a POI in relation to the framework of a curriculum that is international.<br />On the table provided:<br />Review where explorations of personal cultural identities, cross-cultural studies, integration of International perspectives and inquiries into global issues occur within you grade level/school POI<br />Highlight areas in need of development<br />Choose one unit to revise <br />
    109. 109. Share your connections and thoughts about the homework article.<br />Share what you are doing in your school to explore the local host culture.<br />Studying a host culture<br />
    110. 110. Using your experience and by analysing the newspapers and other materials, determine the issues facing UAE as defined within the Visual Organiser of World Culture proposed by Begler.<br />Record on the organiser the issues.<br />Perceptions of UAE<br />
    111. 111. Aesthetic<br />Political<br />Social<br />Economic<br />Values & Beliefs<br />Historical context<br />Geographical context<br />Ref: Begler (1996)<br />
    112. 112. From your work on Begler’s world culture organizer and your field trip experiences:<br />As a group choose an issue on UAE that would relate to a curriculum that is international and could be explored in depth.<br />To support your identified issue, please bring back an artefact, either primary (interview, brochure) or secondary (sketches etc.)<br />UAE Field Trip<br />
    113. 113. Choose a unit you would like to explore in more depth from an international perspective.<br />Revise the unit.<br />Begler visual organizer is available to assist you.<br />Revising a unit<br />
    114. 114. Acceptance <br />&<br />Respect<br />Appreciation<br />& <br />Valuing<br />Intercultural competence<br />Ethnocentrism<br />Awareness<br />Understanding<br />Change<br />Stages of Intercultural Learning<br />Ref: Fennes & Hapgood (1997, p. 48)<br />
    115. 115. Do we know Each other<br />Susan Anita<br />Gary<br />Imelda<br />Amani<br />Sara<br />Veyan<br />Marilyn<br />
    116. 116.
    117. 117.
    118. 118.
    119. 119.
    120. 120.
    121. 121.
    122. 122.
    123. 123.
    124. 124.
    125. 125.
    126. 126.
    127. 127.
    128. 128.
    129. 129.
    130. 130. Individually select a meaningful WORD, PHRASE and SENTENCE<br />Write each one on a post-it note<br />Place on the group chart<br />Share why you chose a particular word, phrase or sentence to the others in your group.<br />Look for patterns in the group response<br />Discuss: Are there important aspects of the article that are not included in the chart?<br />Poore article<br />
    131. 131. Rate your school from your individual perspective on the continuum<br />Discuss your perspective with other school members<br />Highlight agreement on areas of strength and areas to be developed<br />List areas in need of development<br />How international is your school?<br />
    132. 132. Tick your responses to the prompts<br />Turn and talk<br />Discuss similarities and differences<br />Yes, No or Maybe<br />
    133. 133. Choose one of the three scenarios<br />Discuss your response<br />Suggest solutions to this scenario<br />Article: Responding to religious diversity in classrooms (Kirmani & Laster 1999) – page 67<br />Share celebration policies<br />Scenarios<br />
    134. 134. What do we know about the language profiles of students in our school?<br />An example of admissions documents<br />Language policies: sample and guidelines (OCC)<br />Language Survey/Policies<br />
    135. 135. Sit at table of 3 or 4.<br />Read the tournament guide sheet<br />NO VERBAL COMMUNICATION AFTER THIS POINT<br />Read the Five Tricks ‘Easy to learn and play sheet’<br />Return game sheets<br />Begin Round One<br />BARNGA<br />
    136. 136. How did your feelings change during the game?<br />What were your greatest successes/frustrations?<br />What real life situations does Barnga simulate?<br />How did this relate to the experiences you posted on the map this morning?<br />BARNGA<br />
    137. 137. In pairs use the process model of intercultural learning from Fennes and Hapgood (1997) to review the needs of a student transitioning into your school<br />Discuss and document key features of a transition process (both coming and going) that would need to be implemented to assist this student<br />Turn and share at your table<br />Transitions<br />
    138. 138. Languages in the Global Village<br />Source: The Cambridge Factfinder, Cambridge University Press, 1993<br />
    139. 139. Top ten ‘other languages’ in English-speaking countries<br />Source: Viv Edwards (2004) “The Other Languages: a guide to multilingual classrooms”<br />
    140. 140. Possible individual/small group options:<br />Read children’s books/professional materials/sample planner packs<br />Continue with unit review<br />Consult with someone<br />Share materials<br />Explore language/celebration policies<br />Student samples on screen<br />This afternoon<br />
    141. 141. Try to sit in trios with at least one person you have not sat with before.<br />On a card, describe a situation when you have had a positive impact/influence on a child’s image of themselves or an understanding of others.<br />Share before posting around the map.<br />Welcome to Day 6!<br />
    142. 142. Open workbook to page 7.<br />Review stages of racial and ethnic awareness.<br />Share your experiences with these age groups related to the stages and the video clip.<br />A child of our time.<br />
    143. 143.
    144. 144.
    145. 145. Stage<br />II. Colour Awareness (Age 3-5)<br />Racial self-identification<br />May correctly identify colour of skin with own colour words or food colour <br />words e.g. chocolate<br />Racial constancy<br />Believe that if they desire they can change skin colour through painting or <br />waving a magic wand.<br />Origin of racial identity<br />Believe that God, their parents or they themselves have used magical means <br />to produce their colour.<br />Racial classification<br />Able to group accurately by skin colour but not race although brown <br />frequently used to describe many. All light-complexioned people seen as <br />‘white’.<br />Racial attitudes<br />Act positively towards all races/ethnic groups without prejudice unless they <br />have been exposed to racial bigotry where they then may become negative <br />towards some skin colours.<br />
    146. 146.
    147. 147.
    148. 148. Standard A2<br />The school promotes international-mindedness on the part of the adults and the students in the school community.<br />Practices<br />1. The school values and makes productive use of the diversity of cultures and perspectives that exist in the school and in the local, national and global communities to enhance learning.<br />2. The school expects and promotes a commitment to international understanding and responsible citizenship on the part of the adults in the school community.<br />3. The school encourages learning that fosters responsible citizenship and international mindedness.<br />4. The school encourages student learning that strengthens the student’s own cultural identity, and celebrates and fosters understanding of different cultures.<br />5. The school provides students with opportunities for learning about issues that have local, national and global significance, leading to an understanding of human commonalities.<br />6. The school develops a climate of open communication and careful expression of ideas, attitudes and feelings.<br />7. The school provides resources that offer access to different cultures, perspectives and languages.<br />8. The school provides a safe, secure and stimulating environment based on understanding and respect.<br />9. The school attaches importance to language learning through the development of each student’s mother tongue and the acquisition of other languages, including the host country language.<br />10. The school supports members of its community for whom the school’s language of instruction is not their mother tongue.<br />11. Where possible, the school ensures access to global information and recognizes the potential for wider communication through the availability and use of appropriate information and communication technologies (ICT).<br />12. The school takes advantage of the international network of IB schools teaching the same programme through e-mail or personal exchanges and attendance at conferences and workshops.<br />
    149. 149. How are the issues and concepts we have been discussing imbedded within the standards?<br />Individually reflect in journal.<br />Standard A2<br />
    150. 150. What do I want to explore in my classroom/school?<br />Where do I want to start?<br />What is my first priority after the summer holidays?<br />What will I do?<br />Who will support me?<br />What needs to happen at the school level to support my plan?<br />Personal Action Plan<br />
    151. 151. What understandings will you take back to your school based on its need?<br />What process of thinking and discussion might you use to engage your colleagues in thinking about a curriculum that is international?<br />Going back…<br />
    152. 152. Think about the key understanding you are leaving with from this workshop.<br />Write it as a statement in your journal<br />Stand and deliver your statement to the whole group.<br />Stand and Deliver<br />
    153. 153. In past, sign ups have been limited, what should we call this workshop so that it mirrors the workshop and promotes attendance?<br />What needs to be reviewed in the central idea and key understandings?<br />What should we ask you to bring to enhance the workshop?<br />How should this workshop be advertised?<br />
    154. 154. “There is always a danger when we teach about global issues that we make children feel disempowered rather than empowered. That is why it is crucial to read case studies of success stories: examples of children and adults, individuals, groups and governments working to create a better world. Often such stories are small scale but that is where we have to begin.”<br />David Hicks, Project Director of the Global Futures Project<br />
    155. 155. Read ‘Learning through Ethnographic Dialogues’ (Page 57 in workbook)<br />Answer or reflect on the following question:<br />What issues and ideas are related to the study of a host country?<br />Homework<br />
    156. 156. Read the IB Monograph in pairs.<br />1st person reads two paragraphs<br />Then turns and talks about what they have read: their connections/observation/question/ prediction etc.<br />2nd person reads next 2 paragraphs etc.<br />Say Something<br />
    157. 157. From your travels and experience, record on a card a significant moment of cultural learning and the factors that led to this learning.<br />Share with a partner and post on the map.<br />Meet into your global issue groups from yesterday<br />Share your experiences and evidence related to your issue<br />Add new insights or questions related to your chosen issue on the Begler model.<br />Welcome to Day 5!<br />

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