Non-chronic Adult
Homelessness: Background and
Opportunities
Dennis P. Culhane
University of Pennsylvania
National Center ...
Non-chronic Homeless Adults:
Scope: PIT: 278,713 Annual: 754,400
34.5
13.1
52.4
Annual Number of Persons
Homeless
in Famil...
Aging Trend of Adult Homeless in
NYC: Bimodal
Source: Culhane et al. (2013)/ New York City Department of Homeless Services...
Changing Age Distribution: Case
Study in NYC
 50% of the increase in single adult
homeless (2005-2010), was from young
ad...
AHAR: Single Adult % by Age
4.8
20.3
51.9
18.9
1.8
24
43.9
25
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Under age
18
18-30 31-50 51-61
%Sheltere...
Characteristics by Cluster:
Dated Data (Philadelphia, 1998)
Nearly all chronically homeless people have a disability:
Clusters by Characteristics
78.3
71.5 74.6 73.8
11.2 10.8
14.1
11.110.5
17.7
11.3 15.1
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
...
Dynamics:
 Pattern of Homeless Service Use among
Sheltered Individuals: Length of Stay (AHAR)
37.5%
28.9%
33.5%
0
10
20
3...
Where do they Come From?
24.4%
22.1%
14.3%
13.4%
25.8%
Institution
Friends
Own
house/Apt.
Other
Family
28.9
40
15
13.4
2.7...
Intervention Opportunities
 Income
◦ Younger: Jobs and Job Training
◦ Older: SSI
 Services
◦ Younger: Behavioral Health ...
Rapid Rehousing
 Critical Time Intervention (CTI)- Potential
Medicaid reimbursement
 SSVF- Veteran exemplar, approximate...
SSVF Rapid Rehousing: Returns
to Homelessness (Families Vs. Singles)
0.8
0.82
0.84
0.86
0.88
0.9
0.92
0.94
0.96
0.98
1
1
2...
SSVF Rapid Rehousing Vs. GPD:
Rates of Homelessness
0.5
0.55
0.6
0.65
0.7
0.75
0.8
0.85
0.9
0.95
1
1
20
39
58
77
96
115
13...
Non-chronic Recap
 Most homeless households are non-
chronic singles (68.6%)
 Bimodal age growth (20s and 50s)
 24.4% c...
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Non-chronic Adult Homelessness: Background and Opportunities

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Non-chronic Adult Homelessness: Background and Opportunities by Dennis Culhane from the workshop 1.7 Non-Chronic Homelessness among Single Adults: An Overview at the 2014 National Conference on Ending Homelessness

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Non-chronic Adult Homelessness: Background and Opportunities

  1. 1. Non-chronic Adult Homelessness: Background and Opportunities Dennis P. Culhane University of Pennsylvania National Center on Homelessness among Veterans
  2. 2. Non-chronic Homeless Adults: Scope: PIT: 278,713 Annual: 754,400 34.5 13.1 52.4 Annual Number of Persons Homeless in Family Chronic Homeless Non- chronic Homeless Adults Adults 14.2 17.2 68.6 Annual Number of Households Family Households Chronic Homeless Non-chronic Homeless Adults Adults
  3. 3. Aging Trend of Adult Homeless in NYC: Bimodal Source: Culhane et al. (2013)/ New York City Department of Homeless Services Shelter Utilization Data *
  4. 4. Changing Age Distribution: Case Study in NYC  50% of the increase in single adult homeless (2005-2010), was from young adults (18-30).  35% of homeless in their 50s, in 2010, were homeless for the 1st time since 1988.
  5. 5. AHAR: Single Adult % by Age 4.8 20.3 51.9 18.9 1.8 24 43.9 25 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Under age 18 18-30 31-50 51-61 %ShelteredIndividuals (2007-2013) Age 2007 2013 18% 15% 32%
  6. 6. Characteristics by Cluster: Dated Data (Philadelphia, 1998) Nearly all chronically homeless people have a disability:
  7. 7. Clusters by Characteristics 78.3 71.5 74.6 73.8 11.2 10.8 14.1 11.110.5 17.7 11.3 15.1 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% PercentageofPopulation Background Characteristics by Cluster Transitional Episodic Chronic Most homeless people with a disability are Transitionally Homeless.
  8. 8. Dynamics:  Pattern of Homeless Service Use among Sheltered Individuals: Length of Stay (AHAR) 37.5% 28.9% 33.5% 0 10 20 30 40 7 days or less 8 to 30 days 31 to 180 days Percentageof users Length of Stay (Only stays less than 180 days)
  9. 9. Where do they Come From? 24.4% 22.1% 14.3% 13.4% 25.8% Institution Friends Own house/Apt. Other Family 28.9 40 15 13.4 2.7 Institutions S.A Tx Jail Hospital Psychiatric Facility Foster Care
  10. 10. Intervention Opportunities  Income ◦ Younger: Jobs and Job Training ◦ Older: SSI  Services ◦ Younger: Behavioral Health Supports ◦ Older: Chronic Disease Management  Housing ◦ Younger & Older: Rapid Rehousing
  11. 11. Rapid Rehousing  Critical Time Intervention (CTI)- Potential Medicaid reimbursement  SSVF- Veteran exemplar, approximately 30,000 non-chronic adults served in 2013.
  12. 12. SSVF Rapid Rehousing: Returns to Homelessness (Families Vs. Singles) 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 1 1 21 41 61 81 101 121 141 161 181 201 221 241 261 281 301 321 341 361 SurvivalProportion Days Since SSVF Singles Families 1 Year Singles: 15.7% Families: 10.1%
  13. 13. SSVF Rapid Rehousing Vs. GPD: Rates of Homelessness 0.5 0.55 0.6 0.65 0.7 0.75 0.8 0.85 0.9 0.95 1 1 20 39 58 77 96 115 134 153 172 191 210 229 248 267 286 305 324 343 362 SurvivalProportion Days Since Program Exit SSVF GPD 1 Year SSVF: 11.0% GPD: 35.4%
  14. 14. Non-chronic Recap  Most homeless households are non- chronic singles (68.6%)  Bimodal age growth (20s and 50s)  24.4% come out of institutions.  Most disabled adults are non-chronically homeless  SSVF proves rapid rehousing works  Medicaid could pay for CTI

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