1-
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall  1-
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall  1-
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall  1-
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall  1-
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall  1-
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall  1-
Chapter One <ul><li>Why plan? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reasons for writing a business plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who rea...
Introduction <ul><li>Increased interest in the study of entrepreneurship </li></ul><ul><li>2,100  colleges and universitie...
The Business Plan <ul><li>A written document that carefully explains every aspect of a new business venture </li></ul><ul>...
Reasons for Writing a Business Plan <ul><li>Two  main reasons to write a business plan: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internal —F ...
External Support <ul><li>Business incubator </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An organization that provides physical  space and other ...
Who reads the business plan  and what are they looking for? <ul><li>Two  primary audiences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Firm’s em...
Guidelines <ul><li>Structure and style  of the business plan </li></ul><ul><li>Content  of the business plan </li></ul><ul...
Structure and Style <ul><li>Conventional structure   </li></ul><ul><li>25 to 35 pages in length </li></ul><ul><li>Look sha...
Structure and Style <ul><li>Elevator speech </li></ul><ul><li>A brief, carefully constructed statement, usually 45 seconds...
Elevator Speech <ul><li>Four  steps in an elevator speech </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(from business plan insight feature) </li>...
Red Flags <ul><li>Founders with none of their own money at risk </li></ul><ul><li>A poorly cited plan </li></ul><ul><li>De...
Content of the Business Plan <ul><li>Sections </li></ul><ul><li>Convince the reader that  the opportunity is  exciting ,  ...
Measuring the Business Plan Against Your Personal Goals and Aspirations <ul><li>Venture capital </li></ul><ul><li>Venture ...
Venture Capital <ul><li>Using  venture capital  involves surrendering equity in the firm to outsiders in exchange for thei...
Recognizing that Elements of the Business Plan May Change <ul><li>Corridor principle </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Academic princi...
Recognizing that Elements of the Business Plan May Change <ul><li>The business plan  is a living,  </li></ul><ul><li>breat...
Recognizing that Elements of the Business Plan May Change <ul><li>Write deliberate (but) act emergent </li></ul><ul><li>Cr...
Types of Business <ul><li>Four   distinct types of businesses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Survival </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Li...
Types of Business <ul><li>Survival </li></ul><ul><li>Provides its owner </li></ul><ul><li>just enough money to </li></ul><...
Types of Business <ul><li>Lifestyle </li></ul><ul><li>Provides its owner the opportunity to pursue a certain lifestyle and...
Types of Business <ul><li>Managed growth </li></ul><ul><li>Employs 10 or more people, may have several outlets, and may be...
Types of Business <ul><li>Aggressive growth </li></ul><ul><li>Bringing new products and services to the market and has agg...
The Plan for the Book <ul><li>Section  One : Starting the process </li></ul><ul><li>Section  Two : What to do before  the ...
Section One <ul><li>Starting the process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A business plan is an essential document for a firm to have...
Section Two <ul><li>What to do before the business plan is written </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Comprehensive process </li></ul><...
Comprehensive Feasibility Analysis <ul><li>Identifying a business idea </li></ul><ul><li>Screening the idea to determine i...
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall  1-
Section Three <ul><li>Preparing a business plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How to complete each section of a business plan </li...
Section Four <ul><li>Presenting the business plan to  investors and others </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Suggestions for how to ma...
Key Words <ul><li>Business plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A written document that carefully explains every aspect of a new bus...
Key Words <ul><li>Stealth mode </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Companies that formulate their business plans in secret, to avoid tip...
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall  1-
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any f...
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  • Preparing Effective Business Plans An Entrepreneurial Approach By Bruce R. Barringer, PhD Department of Management University of Central Florida Orlando, FL 32816 Email: [email_address]
  • This chapter introduces the idea of the business plan, including the rationale for writing one, the multiple purposes that a business plan can serve both inside and outside the firm, and the key audiences for a business plan. Students will also learn about major imperatives in creating a business plan, as well as some potential pitfalls in writing the business plan. The outline of the text walks the reader through the process from understanding and conceptualizing the plan, preparing to write the plan, creating the plan and finally, presenting the plan to potential investors and others. Chapter Outline Introduction Reasons for Writing a Business Plan Who Reads the Business Plan—And What Are They Looking For? A Firm’s Employees Investors and Other External Stakeholders Guidelines for Writing a Business Plan Structure and Style of the Business Plan Content of the Business Plan Measuring the Business Plan Against Your Personal Goals and Aspirations Recognizing That Elements of the Plan May Change Types of Business The Plan For the Book Section 1: Starting the Process Section 2: What to do Before the Business Plan is Written Section 3: Preparing a Business Plan Section 4: Presenting the Business Plan
  • Research reveals an increased interest in the study of entrepreneurship 2100 colleges and universities offer entrepreneurship coursework; up from 380 in 1990 About 400,000 undergraduate and graduate students took at last one entrepreneurship course in 2005 72% of American adults have considered starting a business
  • The Business Plan is a written document that carefully explains every aspect of a new business venture Inside the firm, the business plan is used to develop a “road map” Outside the firm, it introduces potential investors and other stakeholders to the business opportunities Although a relatively small percentage of entrepreneurs write business plans, there is ample evidence that writing a business plan is an extremely good investment of time and money.
  • Reasons for Writing a Business Plan There are two primary reasons for writing a business plan Internal reason—forces the founders of a firm to systematically think through each aspect of their new venture External reason—communicates the merits of a new venture to outsiders, such as investors and bankers
  • External reason—communicates the merits of a new venture to outsiders, such as investors and bankers One specific type of outside support for entrepreneurs is the business incubator , an organization that provides physical space and other resources to new firms in hopes of promoting economic development in a specific area Investors rely heavily on the business plan to make their decisions regarding initial investment Many investors first ask for an executive summary , which is a short overview of a business plan, or a set of PowerPoint slides describing the merits of a new venture
  • Who Reads the Business Plan—And What Are They Looking For? There are two primary audiences for a firm’s business plan A firm’s employees—because the business plan articulates the vision and future of the firm, both the management team and the rank-and-file employees can benefit from reading the business plan in order to operate in sync and with purpose Investors and other stakeholders—investors, potential business partners, potential customers, grant-awarding agencies, and key employees who are being recruited are all part of the second audience for a business plan To appeal to this group, the business plan must be clear, concise and not overly optimistic or naïve
  • There are four main guidelines to be considered in writing a business plan. 1-- Structure and Style of the Business Plan This includes issues such as length of the business plan, and overall, how the business plan should look 2—Content This includes issues such as what sections should be included in the business plan. For example, financials, appendices, etc. 3--Measuring the Business Plan Against Your Personal Goals and Aspirations This includes issues such as whether venture capital should be acquired. 4- Recognizing that Elements of the Plan May Change This includes issues such as the “corridor principle” and “Write Deliberate But Act Emergent”
  • Structure and Style of the Business Plan The business plan should follow a conventional structure Most experts recommend a length of between 25-35 pages Effective business plans should be sharp, but not look expensive to produce or overly flashy Those who read plans know that entrepreneurs have limited resources and expect them to act accordingly. Business plan software can help provide structure, but all of the content should come from the entrepreneur Outside assistance in putting the plan together is fine, but the enthusiasm of the founder should remain One important criterion that all business plans should adhere to is that they should convey a clear, coherent story of what the business plans to accomplish and how it plans to get there.
  • One thing that a new venture can do to help develop a concise description of their business is develop an elevator speech. An elevator speech is a brief, carefully constructed statement, usually 45 seconds to two minutes long that outlines the merits of a business venture. It is explained in more detail in the business plan insight feature. A properly prepared elevator speech can assist in writing a business plan, by helping the founders develop a sharp and concise description of their business.
  • Steps in an Elevator Speech (from business plan insight feature) Describe the opportunity Describe how your product or service meets the opportunity Describe your qualifications Describe your market
  • There are several potential “red flags” in business plans that savvy investors and others will pick up on when certain aspects of a plan are insufficient or miss the mark. These red flags, which are depicted in Table 1.3, not only undermine the credibility of the business plan but of the individuals who wrote the plan. The writers of a plan should work hard to avoid these potential complications. These red flags include: Founders with none of their own money at risk A poorly cited plan Defining the market size too broadly Overly aggressive financials Hiding or avoiding weakness Sloppiness in any area Too long of a plan
  • Most plans are divided into sections that represent the major aspects of a new venture’s business The plan should convince the reader that the opportunity is exciting, feasible, defensible, and within the capabilities of the people who will be launching the firm Details of each section of the plan will be described later in this book in Section 3: Preparing a Business Plan After the plan is completed, it should be reviewed for spelling and grammar and to make sure that no critical information has been omitted. There are numerous stories about business plans being sent to investors that left out important information. Entrepreneurs vary in terms of how much feedback they solicit during the business planning process. Companies that formulate their business plans in secret, to avoid tipping off potential competitors as to what they’re planning, refer to themselves as operating in “ stealth mode” .
  • Another guideline for writing a business plan is that as a plan is being written, the people involved should continually measure the type of company that they are hoping to start against their personal goals and aspirations. This consideration is important for two reasons. First, the old adage “be careful what you wish for” is as true in business as it is in other areas of life. For instance, if an entrepreneur identifies an opportunity that has a large upside potential, and decides to write a business plan to solicit funds from a venture capitalist or other investor, the entrepreneur should know what to expect if the business is funded. In the case of venture capital, most venture capitalists aim for a 30 to 40 percent annual return on their investment and a total return over the life of the investment of five to 20 times their original investment. This level of expectation forces a firm into a fast-growth model literally from the start, which typically implies a quick pace of activity, a rapidly raising overhead, and a total commitment in terms of time and attention from the founding entrepreneurs.
  • Accepting venture capital also involves surrendering equity in the firm to outsiders (in exchange for their investment) and heavy scrutiny at all levels. The upside is that if the new company is successful, the founders will normally do very well financially. The entrepreneur crafting a business plan to try to attract venture capital should know what he or she is getting into, and should make sure that the lifestyle associated with owning and managing a venture capital funded firm is something that is consistent with his or her personal goals and aspirations. Someone who wants to own their own firm, but places a high value on leisure time or family time or doesn’t want the pressures associated with a group of investors continually looking over their shoulder, would be a poor choice to launch a venture backed firm. This type of individual would be better suited to launch a firm in a target (or niche) market that flies slightly under the radar of large competitors, and write a business plan that solicits funds from friends and family or a lender. There are many successful firms, which include clothing boutiques, Web retailers, and service firms, just to name a few, that fit this profile. In contrast, some people thrive in a high pressure environment and have a high desire to make a large amount of money. An entrepreneur who fit this profile would be better suited to launch a venture backed firm.
  • The corridor principle is an academic principle which states that once an entrepreneur starts a business, he or she begins an journey down a path where “corridors” leading to new venture opportunities become apparent The corridor principle also applies during the preparing of a business plan; new insights will invariably emerge that weren’t initially apparent This process continues throughout the life of a company, and it behooves entrepreneurs to remain alert and open to new insights and ideas
  • The business plan is a living, breathing document, rather than something set in stone
  • In support of this notion, Guy Kawasaki, the Silicon Valley investor and entrepreneur quoted earlier in the chapter, recommends to the authors of business plans to “Write Deliberate, (but) Act Emergent.” What Kawasaki means by this statement is that it is necessary to write a “deliberate” plan that provides a specific blueprint for a new venture to follow, but at the same time, the individuals involved should be thinking “emergent,” which is a mindset that is open to change and is influenced by the day-to-day realities of the marketplace.
  • Types of Businesses There are four distinct types of businesses: Survival—provides its owner just enough money to put food on the table and pay bills (handyman, part-time childcare) Lifestyle—provides its owner the opportunity to pursue a certain lifestyle and make a living at it (clothing boutique, personal trainer) Managed Growth—employs 10 or more people, may have several outlets, and may be introducing new products or services to the market (regional restaurant chain, multi-unit franchise) Aggressive Growth—bringing new products and services to the market and has aggressive growth plans (computer software, medical equipment, national restaurant chain) All of these types of businesses are acceptable—there is no value judgment here. This book, however, focuses primarily on lifestyle, managed growth and aggressive growth firms. Not all businesses grow rapidly and make tons of money, but may still provide their owners satisfying lives and financial security. This book equally targets this type of business along with more aggressive growth firms.
  • Survival—provides its owner just enough money to put food on the table and pay bills (handyman, part-time childcare)
  • Lifestyle—provides its owner the opportunity to pursue a certain lifestyle and make a living at it (clothing boutique, personal trainer)
  • Managed Growth—employs 10 or more people, may have several outlets, and may be introducing new products or services to the market (regional restaurant chain, multi-unit franchise)
  • Aggressive Growth—bringing new products and services to the market and has aggressive growth plans (computer software, medical equipment, national restaurant chain)
  • The book into divided into four sections as shown in Figure 1.2: Section 1: Starting the Process Section 2: What To Do Before the Business Plan is Written Section 3: Preparing a Business Plan Section 4: Presenting the Business Plan to Investors and Others
  • Section 1: Starting the Process A business plan is an essential document for a firm to have at its disposal, particularly if it plans to reach out to others to try to gain access to resources There are two primary reasons for writing a business plan: the process of writing a business plan forces the founders to systematically think through each aspect of their new venture and a business plan introduces potential investors and others to the firm and the business opportunity it is pursuing. Although all business plans vary depending on the nature of the new venture, there are certain guidelines which can increase the odds that a particular plan will be successful. A particularly important consideration, normally unseen to the reader of a plan, is that an individual’s business plan should coincide with his or her personal goals or aspirations. While writing a business plan can be appear to be a tedious process, a well-developed plan can save an entrepreneur a tremendous amount of time and money by working out the flaws in a business idea before rather than after the business is launched.
  • Section 2: What to do Before the Business Plan is Written Writing a business plan is part of a comprehensive process that includes the four steps of The Comprehensive Feasibility Analysis/Business Planning Process There are many steps that logically precede the completion of a business plan, including the preliminary screening of business ideas and feasibility analysis. While the preparation of a business plan is essential, it is often an insufficient exercise through which to complete a full and candid analysis of the merits of a new business idea. Steps that logically precede the completion of a business plan, which include the preliminary screening of business ideas and feasibility analysis, are also important. Many entrepreneurs make the mistake of identifying a business idea and then jump directly to writing a business plan to describe and try to gain support for the idea.
  • The sequential nature of the steps shown in Figure 1.3 cleanly separates the investigative portion of thinking through the merits of a business idea from the planning and selling portion of the process. Steps 2-3 are investigative in nature and are designed to critically critique the merits of the business idea. Step 4, the business plan, is focused on planning and selling. The initial steps are important because there is no reason to write a business plan for a business idea that has little chance of succeeding
  • Section 3: Preparing a Business Plan This section provides an explanation of how to complete each section of a business plan and describes (step by step) the business plan for a fictitious company named Prime Adult Fitness. Prime Adult Fitness is a fitness center for people 50 years old and older. The goal is to teach you to write a business plan that is complete, yet concise and to the point.
  • Section 4: Presenting the Business Plan to Investors and Others If the business plan successfully elicits the interest of a potential banker or investor, or it is entered into a business plan competition, the next step will be to present the business plan to a small group or audience of individuals. The final chapter of the book provides suggestions and guidelines for presenting a business plan to investors and others. Concrete suggestions for how to make effective presentations using PowerPoint slides, and how to field questions from an audience effectively, will be provided.
  • SEM 5 - B.P - Albert LEC.2a

    1. 1. 1-
    2. 2. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    3. 3. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    4. 4. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    5. 5. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    6. 6. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    7. 7. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    8. 8. Chapter One <ul><li>Why plan? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reasons for writing a business plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who reads the business plan — and what are they looking for? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guidelines for writing a business plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of business </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The plan for the book </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    9. 9. Introduction <ul><li>Increased interest in the study of entrepreneurship </li></ul><ul><li>2,100 colleges and universities offer entrepreneurship coursework </li></ul><ul><li>About 400,000 students took at least one entrepreneurship course in 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>72% of American adults have considered starting a business </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    10. 10. The Business Plan <ul><li>A written document that carefully explains every aspect of a new business venture </li></ul><ul><li>Inside the firm, the business plan is used to develop a road map </li></ul><ul><li>Outside the firm, the business plan introduces potential investors and other stakeholders to the business opportunities </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    11. 11. Reasons for Writing a Business Plan <ul><li>Two main reasons to write a business plan: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internal —F orces the founders of the firm to think through every aspect of their new venture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>External — Communicates the merits of a new venture to outsiders, such as investors and bankers </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    12. 12. External Support <ul><li>Business incubator </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An organization that provides physical space and other resources to new firms in hopes of promoting economic development in a specific area </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Investors rely on the business plan to make decisions on initial investment </li></ul><ul><li>Many investors ask for an executive summary — a short overview of the business plan — describing the merits of a new venture </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    13. 13. Who reads the business plan and what are they looking for? <ul><li>Two primary audiences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Firm’s employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Looking for the vision and future of the firm </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Investors and other stakeholders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Investors, potential business partners, potential customers, grant awarding agencies who are being recruited </li></ul></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    14. 14. Guidelines <ul><li>Structure and style of the business plan </li></ul><ul><li>Content of the business plan </li></ul><ul><li>Measuring the business plan against your personal goals and aspirations </li></ul><ul><li>Recognizing that elements of the plan may change </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    15. 15. Structure and Style <ul><li>Conventional structure </li></ul><ul><li>25 to 35 pages in length </li></ul><ul><li>Look sharp but not too expensive or flashy </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    16. 16. Structure and Style <ul><li>Elevator speech </li></ul><ul><li>A brief, carefully constructed statement, usually 45 seconds to 2 minutes long that outlines the merits of a business venture or business plan insight feature </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    17. 17. Elevator Speech <ul><li>Four steps in an elevator speech </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(from business plan insight feature) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe the opportunity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe how your product or service meets the opportunity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe your qualifications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe your market </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    18. 18. Red Flags <ul><li>Founders with none of their own money at risk </li></ul><ul><li>A poorly cited plan </li></ul><ul><li>Defining the market size too broadly </li></ul><ul><li>Overly aggressive financials </li></ul><ul><li>Hiding or avoiding weakness </li></ul><ul><li>Sloppiness in any area </li></ul><ul><li>Too long of a plan </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    19. 19. Content of the Business Plan <ul><li>Sections </li></ul><ul><li>Convince the reader that the opportunity is exciting , feasible , defensible and within the capabilities of the people who will be launching the firm </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    20. 20. Measuring the Business Plan Against Your Personal Goals and Aspirations <ul><li>Venture capital </li></ul><ul><li>Venture capitalists aim for 30 to 40% annual return and total return of 5 to 20 times their original investment over the life of the investment </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    21. 21. Venture Capital <ul><li>Using venture capital involves surrendering equity in the firm to outsiders in exchange for their investment and accepting heavy scrutiny </li></ul><ul><li>Some entrepreneurs find it better to launch a firm in a target market and solicit funds from friends, family, or a lender </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    22. 22. Recognizing that Elements of the Business Plan May Change <ul><li>Corridor principle </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Academic principle that states once an entrepreneur starts a business, he or she begins a journey down a path where corridors leading to new venture opportunities become apparent </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    23. 23. Recognizing that Elements of the Business Plan May Change <ul><li>The business plan is a living, </li></ul><ul><li>breathing document, </li></ul><ul><li>rather than something set in stone </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    24. 24. Recognizing that Elements of the Business Plan May Change <ul><li>Write deliberate (but) act emergent </li></ul><ul><li>Create a deliberate plan that is a specific blueprint to follow </li></ul><ul><li>Think emergent with a mindset that is open to change and influenced by the realities of the marketplace </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    25. 25. Types of Business <ul><li>Four distinct types of businesses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Survival </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifestyle </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Managed growth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aggressive growth </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    26. 26. Types of Business <ul><li>Survival </li></ul><ul><li>Provides its owner </li></ul><ul><li>just enough money to </li></ul><ul><li>put food on the table </li></ul><ul><li>and pay bills </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    27. 27. Types of Business <ul><li>Lifestyle </li></ul><ul><li>Provides its owner the opportunity to pursue a certain lifestyle and make a living at it (clothing boutique, personal trainer) </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    28. 28. Types of Business <ul><li>Managed growth </li></ul><ul><li>Employs 10 or more people, may have several outlets, and may be introducing new products or services to the market </li></ul><ul><li>(regional restaurant chain, multi-unit franchise) </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    29. 29. Types of Business <ul><li>Aggressive growth </li></ul><ul><li>Bringing new products and services to the market and has aggressive growth plans (computer software, medical equipment, national restaurant chain) </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    30. 30. The Plan for the Book <ul><li>Section One : Starting the process </li></ul><ul><li>Section Two : What to do before the business plan is written </li></ul><ul><li>Section Three : Preparing a business plan </li></ul><ul><li>Section Four : Presenting the business plan </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    31. 31. Section One <ul><li>Starting the process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A business plan is an essential document for a firm to have at its disposal, particularly if it plans to reach out to others to try to gain access to resources </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    32. 32. Section Two <ul><li>What to do before the business plan is written </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Comprehensive process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Four steps of the comprehensive feasibility analysis/business planning process </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    33. 33. Comprehensive Feasibility Analysis <ul><li>Identifying a business idea </li></ul><ul><li>Screening the idea to determine its initial feasibility </li></ul><ul><li>Conducting a full feasibility analysis to determine if proceeding with a business plan is warranted </li></ul><ul><li>Writing the plan </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    34. 34. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    35. 35. Section Three <ul><li>Preparing a business plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How to complete each section of a business plan </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    36. 36. Section Four <ul><li>Presenting the business plan to investors and others </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Suggestions for how to make effective presentations using PowerPoint slides and how to field questions from an audience effectively </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    37. 37. Key Words <ul><li>Business plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A written document that carefully explains every aspect of a new business venture </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Business incubator </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An organization that provides physical space and other resources to new firms in hopes of promoting economic development in a specific area </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Executive summary </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A short overview of a business plan or a set of PowerPoint slides describing the merits of a new venture </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    38. 38. Key Words <ul><li>Stealth mode </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Companies that formulate their business plans in secret, to avoid tipping off potential competitors as to what they're planning </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Corridor principle </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An academic principle which states that once an entrepreneur starts a business, he or she begins a journey down a path where corridors leading to new venture opportunities become apparent </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    39. 39. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 1-
    40. 40. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America. Copyright ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  publishing as Prentice Hall

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