Mark scheme for tv drama

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  • Primeval Clip.
  • Mark scheme for tv drama

    1. 1. What is the examiner looking for in your answer
    2. 2. The Big Three  Explanation/Analysis/Argument (20 marks)  Use of Examples (20 marks)  Use of Terminology (10 marks)  Camera shots, Angle, Movement, and Composition  Editing  Sound  Mise en Scene
    3. 3. We are better than this  Level One 17/50  EAA 0 - 7 marks  EG 0 - 7 marks  T 0 - 3 marks  Level Two 27/50  EAA 8 -11 marks  EG 8 -11 marks  T 4 -5 marks “ Some simple ideas have been expressed in an appropriate context. There are likely to be some errors of spelling, punctuation and grammar of which some may be noticeable and intrusive” “Some simple ideas have been expressed. There will be some errors of spelling, punctuation and grammar, which will be noticeable and intrusive. Writing may also lack legibility”
    4. 4. Level Three  “Straightforward ideas have been expressed with some clarity and fluency. Arguments are generally relevant, though may stray from the point of the question. There will be some errors of spelling, punctuation and grammar, but these are unlike to be intrusive or obscure meaning”
    5. 5. Level Three  EAA 12 – 15 marks  Show proficient understanding of task  Proficient understanding of how technical aspects construct representation  Mostly relevant to set question  EG 12 – 15 marks  Offers consistent textual evidence  Offers a range of examples (at least 3 areas covered)  Examples mostly relevant to set question  T 4 -5 marks  Use of terminology is mostly accurate
    6. 6. Level Four  “Complex issues have been expressed clearly and fluently. Sentences and paragraphs, consistently relevant, have been well structured, using appropriate technical terminology. There may be few, if any, errors of spelling, punctuation and grammar”
    7. 7. Level Four  EAA 16 – 20 marks  Excellent understanding of task  Excellent knowledge/ understanding of how technical aspects construct representation  Clearly relevant to set question  EG 16 – 20 marks  Offers frequent textual analysis from extract – range and appropriateness  Offers full range of examples from each area  Examples clearly relevant to the set question  T 8 – 10 marks  Use of terminology is relevant and accurate
    8. 8. How do we give the examiner what they want?  Two approaches to writing up your ideas  1. Technical Areas – deal with each area separately ( at least 2 paragraphs each area)  State the area and specific technique, give the example (denotative), make the link to representation (connotative) and explain how technique and example create the representation  2. Stereotypes – describe how the stereotypes are presented though combined technical areas (2 paragraphs for each stereotype – about 2- 3)  State the stereotype, give examples of how the stereotype is shown through denotative and connotative readings
    9. 9. How do we give the examiner what they want?  Whatever approach you choose use a good paragraph structure (PEE)  Point – Topic sentence where you clearly state either the technique you are going to talk about or the key representation you are focusing on  Example – denotative description of element or stereotype as seen in the extract  Explanation/Analysis – how meaning is generated, why it is done, how the audience responses, issues, a bit of theory, linking it back to the area of represenation etc Don’t write an introduction or conclusion
    10. 10. Primeval Example  In the final scene from the extract, a high angle shot is used to overlook Jenny from the man‟s point of view. Jenny is lying down on the ground after the man has pushed her. This emphasizes her vulnerability and his physical dominance over the situation as he is placed over her, looking down. This confronts to the typical stereotype that women are weaker that men. Jenny needs to be rescued by West, one of the male members of the team. When he arrives West is shown to be stood above Jenny in a low-angle shot highlights his powerful presence and is in stark contrast to the helplessness of Jenny.
    11. 11. Primeval Example  In the final scene from the extract, a high angle shot is used to overlook Jenny from the man‟s point of view. Jenny is lying down on the ground after the man has pushed her. This emphasizes her vulnerability and his physical dominance over the situation as he is placed over her, looking down. This confronts to the typical stereotype that women are weaker that men. Jenny needs to be rescued by West, one of the male members of the team. When he arrives West is shown to be stood above Jenny in a low-angle shot highlights his powerful presence and is in stark contrast to the helplessness of Jenny.
    12. 12. Representation Theories  Laura Mulvey – argues that cinema positions the audience as male. The camera gazes at the female object on screen. It also frames the male character watching the female.  We watch the girl; we see the male watching the girl; we position ourselves within the text as a male objectively gazing at the female.  Can be applied to other media forms also.
    13. 13. Hegemony (dominant ideology) – Richard Dyer A key concern in the study of representation is with the way in which representations are made to seem „natural‟. All texts, however 'realistic' they may seem to be, are constructed representations Richard Dyer posed questions that force people to challenge or question the dominant ideology Dyer said: „How we are seen determines how we are treated, how we treat others is based on how we see them. How we see them comes from representation.‟
    14. 14. Subculture – Dick Hebdidge  In his book, Subculture and The Meaning of Style, Hebdidge said that a subculture is a group of like minded individuals who feel neglected by societal standards and who develop a sense of identity which differs to the dominant on to which they belong.  Ken Gelder lists 6 ways in which a subculture can be recognised: 1) Often have negative relationship to work 2) Negative or ambivalent relationship to class 3) Through their associations with territory ( The street, the hood, the club) rather than property 4) Through their stylistic ties to excess 5) Through their movement out of home into non-domestic forms of belonging (social groups as opposed to family) 6) Through their refusal to engage with they might see as the „banalities‟ of life.
    15. 15. Your Turn - Discuss the ways in which the extract constructs the representation of gender….  In groups you are going to write up an answer based on one area (2 – 3 paragraphs)  You are going to use approach 1  You will have 20mins  Self assessment
    16. 16. Self Assessment  Have you:  Identify specific stereotypes  Used key media terms correctly  Used detailed references to the text  Explained how techniques can be read to make assumptions about representation  Linked every example to representation/ stereotypes and analysed how the techniques create representation.  Stated whether or not specific stereotypes are reinforced or challenged  Discussed the issues surround the use of stereotypes and making links to theories and possible the audience (effects)  Used good paragraphing and sentence structures, correct spelling • Has done all of these = L4+ • Have done most of these = L4 • Have done some of these = L3 • Have done a few of these = L2 • Have done hardly any of these = L1

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