One note training

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One note training

  1. 1. [Your company name] presents:<br />Microsoft® Office OneNote®2007 Training<br />Get to know OneNote<br />
  2. 2. Get to know OneNote<br />Course contents<br /><ul><li>Overview: Learn the basics
  3. 3. Lesson 1: All the things you can do with OneNote
  4. 4. Lesson 2: Organize your notes</li></ul>Each lesson includes a list of suggested tasks and a set of test questions.<br />
  5. 5. Get to know OneNote<br />Overview: Learn the basics<br />OneNote is designed for note taking, brainstorming, research, searching, collaboration, collecting random bits of information — basically everything you’ve ever tried to do in notepads, sticky notes, to-do lists, and maybe even white boards. <br />OneNote makes it all easier, and you’ll be able to keep all your information in one easy-to-manage location.<br />This course is designed to help you get to know OneNote. <br />
  6. 6. Get to know OneNote<br />Course goals <br /><ul><li>Learn to take, gather, and manipulate various types of information, including notes and sketches.
  7. 7. Send your OneNote notes to other Office programs, to streamline your own processes and reduce the time involved.
  8. 8. Find a particular note again by using search or by organizing your notes with sections and notebooks. </li></li></ul><li>Lesson 1<br />All the things you can do with OneNote<br />
  9. 9. Get to know OneNote<br />All the things you can do with OneNote<br />Getting a handle on information in your job, and at home, can be overwhelming. <br />There are so many sources of information in the information age. <br />OneNote is designed to help you keep track of all this. It’s great for doing research, taking notes, organizing lists, and more — and keeping it all in one place.<br />Here you’ll find out how to get information into OneNote, arrange that information to your satisfaction, and use your notes in other Office programs.<br />
  10. 10. Get to know OneNote<br />Write your notes<br />When OneNote opens, you can start taking notes right away on the page, the blank central area in OneNote. <br />Just click and type, or write, or draw — it really is that simple. <br />Animation: Right-click, and click Play.<br />All notes are held in note containers, which are invisible boxes that appear only when you move the cursor close to them.<br />The animation shows how to take notes, add a new page, and enter a title. <br />
  11. 11. Get to know OneNote<br />Write your notes<br />When OneNote opens, you can start taking notes right away on the page, the blank central area in OneNote. <br />Just click and type, or write, or draw — it really is that simple. <br />All notes are held in note containers, which are invisible boxes that appear only when you move the cursor close to them.<br />Here, you’ve titled your page “Plants to buy.” As soon as you click on the page and start typing your plant selections, their names appear in the note container. <br />
  12. 12. Get to know OneNote<br />Internet research<br />Have you ever taken notes about something you’ve seen on the Internet, and later wondered where you found the information? <br />You’ll love this. <br />When you copy any text from a Web page and paste it into OneNote, the URL of the source page is included for you — with no extra effort at all. <br />And if you copy a hyperlink, it retains its functionality and doesn’t turn into plain text.<br />
  13. 13. Get to know OneNote<br />Insert screen clips<br />Research doesn’t always mean just text: sometimes you might want an image or an actual screen print of the source. <br />You can do that, too, in OneNote.<br />In your Web browser window (or any other program window) press the Windows logo key ( ) + S.<br />Select an area of your screen using the mouse.<br />
  14. 14. Get to know OneNote<br />Insert screen clips<br />Research doesn’t always mean just text: sometimes you might want an image or an actual screen print of the source. <br />You can do that, too, in OneNote.<br />The screen clipping is automatically inserted into a separate OneNote window.<br />
  15. 15. Get to know OneNote<br />Move notes on a page<br />The meeting is over, and your notes are all over the page. <br />Now you’d like to organize them and combine a few notes into the same paragraph. <br />Animation: Right-click, and click Play.<br />The animation shows how you can move notes by moving the note container; move text from one container to another; combine note containers; and more. <br />
  16. 16. Get to know OneNote<br />Move notes on a page<br />The meeting is over, and your notes are all over the page. <br />Now you’d like to organize them and combine a few notes into the same paragraph. <br />The picture shows how you can move notes around by moving the note container. <br />Position the pointer on the bar at the top of the container, and when the four-headed arrow appears, drag the container to a new position. <br />
  17. 17. Get to know OneNote<br />Move notes on a page <br />Here are other ways to move text around on a page:<br /><ul><li>Move text from one container to another by selecting the text and dragging it.
  18. 18. Move individual paragraphs by clicking and dragging the handle that appears to the left of the paragraph.
  19. 19. Combine notes containers by holding down the SHIFT key while you drag one container to the other.
  20. 20. Change the width of the paragraph by resizing the note container. Point to the edge of the container, and when the two-headed arrow appears, drag the edge of the container. </li></li></ul><li>Get to know OneNote<br />Move drawings<br />When words don’t tell the whole story, try a drawing. <br />You can draw freehand, or use buttons on the Drawing Tools toolbar.<br />Animation: Right-click, and click Play.<br />Once drawings are on a page, whether freehand or drawn using the Drawing Tools toolbar, you can move and resize them just as you do text. <br />The animation shows how to move separate images and groups of drawings.<br />
  21. 21. Get to know OneNote<br />Move drawings<br />When words don’t tell the whole story, try a drawing. <br />You can draw freehand, or use buttons on the Drawing Tools toolbar.<br />Once drawings are on a page, whether freehand or drawn using the Drawing Tools toolbar, you can move and resize them just as you do text. <br />You can select each separate image and move it using the four-headed arrow, as shown here, or resize it using the two-headed arrow. <br />
  22. 22. Get to know OneNote<br />Format notes<br />OneNote has all the features you would expect from a product designed for working with words. <br />You can use bulleted and numbered lists, insert symbols, check spelling, and format fonts as you would in Microsoft Office Word. You can even use tables. <br />
  23. 23. Get to know OneNote<br />Other Office programs<br />Just because your notes are in OneNote doesn’t mean they have to stay there: <br />OneNote is fully integrated with other Microsoft Office programs. <br />Here are just a few of the things you can do:<br /><ul><li>Send notes in an Outlook e-mail message.
  24. 24. Send notes to Word.
  25. 25. Mark a note as an Outlook task. </li></li></ul><li>Get to know OneNote<br />Side Note: Desktop sticky notes<br />If you’re one of those people who has sticky notes everywhere to remind you to do things, you’re going to like Side Note.<br />Animation: Right-click, and click Play.<br />Side Note is a small version of OneNote that appears in its own small window and that can stay on top of all the other windows on your desktop.<br />The animation shows Side Note in action. <br />
  26. 26. Get to know OneNote<br />Side Note: Desktop sticky notes<br />If you’re one of those people who has sticky notes everywhere to remind you to do things, you’re going to like Side Note.<br />Side Note is a small version of OneNote that appears in its own small window and that can stay on top of all the other windows on your desktop.<br />So if you’re reading an e-mail message that has a valuable nugget or suddenly remember that you need to water the plants, just press the Windows logo key + N. <br />
  27. 27. Get to know OneNote<br />Suggestions for practice<br />Work with text. <br />Copy notes and screen clips from other places. <br />Use Side Note.<br />See how to work with other Microsoft Office programs. <br />Work with drawings. <br />Optional: Experiment with freehand drawing and the lasso. <br />Online practice (requires OneNote 2007)<br />
  28. 28. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 1, question 1<br />What do you have to do before starting to take notes in OneNote? (Pick one answer.)<br />Nothing, just type (or write). <br />Open a new blank file. <br />Start a new page. <br />Save the existing notes. <br />
  29. 29. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 1, question 1: Answer<br />Nothing, just type (or write). <br />Just open OneNote and start. <br />
  30. 30. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 1, question 2<br />You’re organizing some text notes and want to rearrange them. What do you do? (Pick one answer.)<br />Cut and paste them to a new location. <br />You can’t do anything. <br />Drag the notes to where you want them. <br />Lasso them and then drag them. <br />
  31. 31. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 1, question 2: Answer<br />Drag the notes to where you want them. <br />You can move individual words or whole note containers by dragging them.<br />
  32. 32. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 1, question 3<br />What is a Side Note? (Pick one answer.)<br />A note on a sidecar. <br />OneNote on a mobile device. <br />A note in really small font size. <br />A small version of OneNote that appears in its own small window. <br />
  33. 33. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 1, question 3: Answer<br />A small version of OneNote that appears in its own small window.<br />Side Note is like a desktop sticky note: the small Side Note window can stay on top of all the other windows on your desktop.<br />
  34. 34. Lesson 2<br />Organize your notes<br />
  35. 35. Get to know OneNote<br />Organize your notes<br />Imagine having OneNote full of pages of notes, and you can’t find anything. What would you do?<br />Fear not, OneNote has you covered. <br />There’s a powerful and quick search feature in OneNote, which means that you’ll be able to find things when you need them. <br />To search, just click in the Search All Notebooks box, shown here, and then enter your search term or keyword.<br />
  36. 36. Get to know OneNote<br />Notebooks and sections<br />A notebook is a container for a set of pages. Each notebook is divided into sections, and each section has pages. <br />Think of it like this:<br />Just as a paper notebook has section dividers and pages within each section….<br />A OneNote notebook has section tabs. You can have as many sections as you need. <br />
  37. 37. Get to know OneNote<br />Notebooks and sections<br />You can also have many notebooks; exactly how you organize your notes is up to you. <br />Notebooks and sections are right in front of you in OneNote; they’re part of what you always see in the OneNote window.<br />
  38. 38. Get to know OneNote<br />Create notebooks and sections<br />Creating notebooks and sections is simple; the picture captures the process. <br />On the Standard toolbar, click the arrow next to the New Section button.<br />On the menu, click what you want: Section, Section Group, or Notebook. (If you only want a section, you don’t have to use the menu. Just click the New Section button.)<br />
  39. 39. Get to know OneNote<br />Create notebooks and sections<br />Creating notebooks and sections is simple; the picture captures the process. <br />You can get an overview of all your sections, section groups, and notebooks in the Navigation Bar. Just click the Expand Navigation Bar button to see everything.<br />
  40. 40. Get to know OneNote<br />Move notebooks, pages or sections<br />You may want to move things around so that notes are easier to find or work with. As the animation shows, it’s easy to move notebooks, section groups, sections, even pages. <br />Animation: Right-click, and click Play.<br />Move sections and notebooks in the Navigation Bar: Just drag notebooks, section groups, or sections from one location to another. <br />To move a single page, drag the page tab. <br />
  41. 41. Get to know OneNote<br />Move notebooks, pages or sections<br />You may want to move things around so that notes are easier to find or work with. <br />You can move sections and notebooks in the Navigation Bar. Just drag notebooks, section groups, or sections from one location to another, as shown here.<br />To move a single page, drag the page tab, either to another position in the same section, or to a completely different section.<br />
  42. 42. Get to know OneNote<br />Unfiled notes<br />If you’re not a natural filer, do not panic. <br />You won’t have to search through OneNote, looking for the section you want, in each meeting you attend.<br />Instead, you can just start taking notes, then sort them out later. There’s a section called Unfiled Notes that’s designed just for this scenario. <br />Take notes in there, and then organize them when you have time. The Unfiled Notes section is where your screen clips and side notes go, too.<br />
  43. 43. Get to know OneNote<br />Suggestions for practice<br />Create a notebook. <br />Create a new section. <br />Explore the Navigation Bar.<br />Move notebooks, sections, and pages. <br />Online practice (requires OneNote 2007)<br />
  44. 44. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 2, question 1<br />To use OneNote, you must create notebooks and sections. (Pick one answer.)<br />True.<br />False. <br />
  45. 45. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 2, question 1: Answer<br />False. <br />You an use the Unfiled Notes section, and rely on search to find things. <br />
  46. 46. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 2, question 2<br />A section is to a notebook as a what? (Pick one answer.)<br />Notebook is to a section group. <br />Page is to a section. <br />Page is to a section group. <br />Kitten is to a cat. <br />
  47. 47. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 2, question 2: Answer<br />Page is to a section. <br /> A page is stored in a section, just as a section is stored in a notebook.<br />
  48. 48. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 2, question 3<br />How do you move a section? (Pick one answer.)<br />On the Edit menu, click Move. <br />Right-click it, and then click Move. <br />Press CTRL, and then drag the section to the desired location. <br />Just drag it to where you want it. <br />
  49. 49. Get to know OneNote<br />Test 2, question 3: Answer<br />Just drag it to where you want it. <br />You can move sections, notebooks, and pages by dragging them. <br />
  50. 50. Get to know OneNote<br />Quick Reference Card<br />For a summary of the tasks covered in this course, view the Quick Reference Card.<br />
  51. 51. USING THIS TEMPLATE<br />See the notes pane or view the full notes page (View menu or tab) for detailed help on this template.<br />

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