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How to Prepare For a Peering Partner Business Review by CF Chui, Kentik

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How to Prepare For a Peering Partner Business Review by CF Chui, Kentik

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Peering is more than just setting up sessions with any AS that will accept one. Peering can involve long-term relationships that require reviews and joint planning to grow synergy. A critical milestone in any peering relationship is the business review; and when it comes to business reviews, it’s all about preparation. Learn how Kentik can help you get ready to ace business reviews with peering partners.

Peering is more than just setting up sessions with any AS that will accept one. Peering can involve long-term relationships that require reviews and joint planning to grow synergy. A critical milestone in any peering relationship is the business review; and when it comes to business reviews, it’s all about preparation. Learn how Kentik can help you get ready to ace business reviews with peering partners.

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How to Prepare For a Peering Partner Business Review by CF Chui, Kentik

  1. 1. How to Prepare for a Peering Partner Business Review C F Chui
  2. 2. • Open peering policy - will peer with everyone and everywhere possible • Selective peering policy - will generally peer, but there are a set of requirements that define how mutual benefit can be gained from peering • Restrictive peering policy - will peer, but not seeking new peers and will generally decline any requests Peering policy basics
  3. 3. • Ratio - the network requires a certain balance between the sent and received traffic from the potential peer • Volume - the network requires a certain volume to justify the increased workload involved in setting up and maintaining connections • Locations - the network requires a certain geographic overlap between the networks so they can hand off traffic most efficiently and save bandwidth within their own network • Customers of an existing peer - if your network is a customer of an existing peer to your peering prospect, your traffic is already on a free connection for them and your traffic might be needed in a potential ratio-relationship between your peering prospect and your provider Selective peering policy
  4. 4. POLL: What is your peering policy?
  5. 5. Analysis
  6. 6. Routing • How is traffic routing in your network? • How is traffic routed in your peer’s network? • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA • Data Explorer is your friend
  7. 7. Routing • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA
  8. 8. Routing • Add a connection in NYC will be good for us • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA • How does that work for the partner?
  9. 9. Routing • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA
  10. 10. Quality - Synthetic tests • Continuous path monitoring with alerts shows your connectivity works as planned and alerts you when it does not • Continuous monitoring of packet loss, latency and jitter with alerting means you are already on it before your customers experience any degradation • Automation could be triggered by alerts from the tests and do it for you • State of the internet measurements can help you quickly determine if an alert from a test from your network to an internet destination is due to internet weather or if you need to take action inside your network. • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA
  11. 11. @ Your network
  12. 12. Private Agents Comparison Item 1 • test services inside your network • Test gateway availability • Test routing to your network • Test global reachability • Destinations inside your network • Destinations on the internet • Test routing from your network to destinations of interest • Inside your network • Outside your network • Test latency to selected destinations • Test services used by your customers from inside your network Global Agents
  13. 13. Quality - Synthetic tests • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA
  14. 14. Volume • You will need to have a simple check of the ratio and the volume of traffic if your peering partner’s policy requires it. However it is more important to have a traffic forecast. What is the expected traffic growth? When you know this, you can discuss the capacity of the connections with the peering partner. • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA
  15. 15. • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA
  16. 16. Cost • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA
  17. 17. Peering type and technology • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA • Public or Private peering • Private peering • Interface capacity? • 10G vs 100G vs 400G? • Metro connect or cross connects And what do we think our peer prefers?
  18. 18. BATNA • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA • Best Alternative to Negotiated Agreement • Is status quo good enough? • Should we move to transit? And what do we think our peer would do?
  19. 19. BATNA • Routing • Quality • Volume • Cost • BATNA
  20. 20. Conclusion
  21. 21. • We have identified a routing issue and documented a hairpin issue in the current setup. • We have documented the consequences of the issue by showing latency data. • The solution is a new connection in the NYC metro. • Since traffic is growing very slowly, there is not an immediate need for more capacity so, if fixing the hairpin is not important for the peer, we can: • Offer to pay the cross connects, or • Suggest a session on an IXP in the metro. • If the status quo is unacceptable to us, our BATNA is to buy local transit and move the traffic to that connection. Game Plan
  22. 22. Questions?
  23. 23. Copyright © 2021 Kentik. All rights reserved. Interested in learning more? Contact cfchui@kentik.com Thank you!

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