Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Executive Function Presentation - MyLearningSpringboard.com

5,513 views

Published on

This presentation provides strategies to improve executive function skills.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Executive Function Presentation - MyLearningSpringboard.com

  1. 1. Laurie Gross, M.A., M.A.T., Educational Therapist & Consultant laurie@mylearningspringboard.com 646.478.8692, ext. 3 www.mylearningspringboard.com Improving Executive Function Skills with
  2. 2. Inspired by… Cutting Edge Approaches for
 Executive Functioning
 
 Presented by: 
 Sarah Ward M.S., CCC-SLP cognitiveconnectionstherapy.com Johns Hopkins University September 27, 2014
  3. 3. We need to figure out how to support students with Executive Function challenges Executive Function is all about… Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  4. 4. WHAT IS SITUATIONAL INTELLIGENCE? It’s the ability to read a room. SITUATIONAL INTELLIGENCE! S T O P Space: You need to be aware of it and what usually happens in it. Time: You need to be aware of when it is happening. Objects: You need to be aware of how things are organized. People: You need to be aware of the people involved. What are they doing? Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  5. 5. S.T.O.P. and Read the Room! Space: Where am I? What is going on? Is this expected? Unexpected? Time: Time of day? Routine or non-routine? What is happening at this moment in time? What’s coming up? What pace is required? Objects: How are things organized? What is the basis for their organization?
 People: Read the person. What does their face look like? What is their body, appearance, mood, pace saying? Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  6. 6. Executive Function compromised kids need the sequence of activities spelled out for them. The big picture of what is needed to do isn’t instinctive . Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  7. 7. Mimetic Ideational Information Processing This is a big deal! Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  8. 8. What is Mimetic Ideational Information Processing? - Being a “mind mime” - Mime the idea in your head. - Mental pre-simulation of how the future will play out. - It is a mental dress rehearsal. - A mental trial and error with out the risk of error. - You can try it out and pre-experience the emotion of a situation. - Without risk you can run a plan A and a plan B and pre-experience how this feel. Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  9. 9. We have to teach kids with EF challenges how to FUTURE THINK! 90% of planning occurs in a different space from where we execute it. We can help students develop future situational thinking by using S.T.O.P. Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  10. 10. Elements of Future Thinking (The Mind Mime) 1. S.T.O.P. - What will it look like? 2. Episodic Future Thinking - What do I look like doing it? 3. Prospective Visual Memory - How am I moving to achieve this? 4. Future Emotion - How do I feel? 
 Motivation comes from imagining the emotional future. Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  11. 11. Executive Function is the ability to pre-imagine the future. “What do I need to do to get it done?” The PASSAGE of TIME underlies all executive function skills. Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  12. 12. Strategies: Remediating Executive Function Skills Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  13. 13. Get it DONE Always start with DONE! Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  14. 14. Get Ready…Do…Done Put on your FUTURE glasses to find out. So, what does DONE look like? Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  15. 15. What does 
 “Get Ready, Do, Done” 
 look like? 
 Example: Classroom/desk space Get Ready DO Done Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  16. 16. - Have I taken out my agenda book, all my notebooks/homework folder? - Have I set up my DONE space? - Have I left my notebooks/folders open in the DONE space so I can quickly put my materials away when I’m done? HOMEWORK & Get Ready, Do, Done Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  17. 17. - As I take out each assignment, have I visualized what it will look like, and do I know how I will feel when it is completed? - Now that I know what it will look and feel like when I’m done, what do I need to do to GET READY for each assignment? - Have I placed the assignment in my GET READY space? - Do I have what I need to do this assignment? - How will I feel when I’m finished? - DO! Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  18. 18. The Passage of Time Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  19. 19. Our kids don’t always sense the passage of time and if they do, it’s generally not accurate. How do we help them? The Passage of Time Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  20. 20. The WORKING Clock It’s analog. It’s at eye level. It’s meaningful. The Passage of Time Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  21. 21. Step 3: Count in 5- or 10- minute increments The WORKING Clock Step 1: Shade the available time Step 2: Create time markers - Start time, stop time, midpoint Start time: Get Ready Midpoint: Do Stop: DONE Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  22. 22. Midpoint Check-in 1. How am I doing at this midpoint marker? 2. Am I still focused on the goal? 3. Has my priority changed? 4. Am I still answering the question? 5. Do I need to change my pace? Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  23. 23. The 1 Minute Gauge Rule How to figure out how long an assignment might take. Then: Assign one minute/part to get the basic idea of time. Ask yourself: How many sections are there? How many parts/questions are there in each section? Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  24. 24. Rate the difficulty of each part/question with a 1, 2, or 3 Easy - 1 minute Kind of hard - 2 minutes Hard - 3 minutes Round up/down to 5 minute intervals Develop a mathematical equation and figure out how much time you will need… Use the CLOCK! Remember! Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014
  25. 25. Laurie Gross, M.A., M.A.T., Educational Therapist & Consultant laurie@mylearningspringboard.com 646.478.8692, ext. 3 www.mylearningspringboard.com Improving Executive Function Skills with Source: Sarah Ward, M.S., CCC/SLP and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, 2014

×