People-First Language<br />Presented by : Myeshi Briley, MS,HS-BCP<br />
People-First Language<br />People-First Language is a great tool for someone that wants to learn more about the areas of d...
People-First Language<br />People-first language is a form of linguistic prescriptivism in English, aiming to avoid percei...
People-First Language<br />People with disabilities are -- first and foremost, people -- people who have individual abilit...
Descripción de las personas con discapacidades ¿Quiénes son las personas con discapacidades?<br />Personas con discapacida...
People-First Language<br />Every individual regardless of sex, age, race or ability deserves to be treated with dignity an...
People-First Language<br />Be sensitive when choosing the words you use. Here are a few guidelines on appropriate language...
Descripción de las personas con discapacidades <br />Sea sensitivo al elegir las palabras que usa. La siguiente es una guí...
People-First Language<br />Use handicap to refer to a barrier created by people or the environment. Use disability to indi...
Descripción de las personas con discapacidades <br />Use "hándicap" para referirse a la barrera creada por las personas o ...
People-First Language<br />People First Language recognizes that individuals with disabilities are - first and foremost - ...
Reference: <br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People-first_language<br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publicatio...
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People1st Language

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Myeshi Briley,MS,HS-BCP helps others to understand the importance of disability etiquette with tools thats out there to use. She understands the importants of such tools.

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People1st Language

  1. 1. People-First Language<br />Presented by : Myeshi Briley, MS,HS-BCP<br />
  2. 2. People-First Language<br />People-First Language is a great tool for someone that wants to learn more about the areas of disability and the language.<br />What you should say and What you should not say that might offended someone.<br />RESPECT is important….<br />
  3. 3. People-First Language<br />People-first language is a form of linguistic prescriptivism in English, aiming to avoid perceived and subconscious dehumanization when discussing people with disabilities, as such forming an aspect of disability etiquette.<br />The basic idea is to impose a sentence structure that names the person first and the condition second, i.e. "people with disabilities" rather than "disabled people", in order to emphasize that "they are people first". Because English syntax normally places adjectives before nouns, it becomes necessary to insert relative clauses, replacing, e.g., "deaf person" with "a person who is deaf" or "asthmatic person" with "a person who has asthma." Furthermore, the use of to be is deprecated in favor of using to have, i.e. "a person who has a hearing impairment" over "a person who is deaf".<br />The speaker is thus expected to internalize the idea of a disability as a secondary attribute, not a characteristic of a person's identity. Critics of this rationale point out that the unnatural sentence structure draws even more attention to the disability than using unmarked English syntax, producing an additional "focus on disability in an ungainly new way".<br />The term people-first language first appears in 1988 as recommended by advocacy groups in the United States<br />
  4. 4. People-First Language<br />People with disabilities are -- first and foremost, people -- people who have individual abilities, interests and needs. For the most part, they are ordinary individuals seeking to live ordinary lives. People with disabilities are moms, dads, sons, daughters, sisters, brothers, friends, neighbors, coworkers, students and teachers.  About 54 million Americans -- one out of every five individuals -- have a disability. Their contributions enrich our communities and society as they live, work and share their lives. <br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publications/pfanguage.asp<br />
  5. 5. Descripción de las personas con discapacidades ¿Quiénes son las personas con discapacidades?<br />Personas con discapacidades son -- primero y antes que nada, personas -- personas con destrezas, intereses y necesidades propias. Por la mayor parte, son individuos comunes buscando vivir vidas comunes. Personas con discapacidades son mamás, papás, hijos, hijas, hermanos, hermanas, amigos, vecinos, compañeros de trabajo, estudiantes y maestros. Cerca de 54 millones de estadounidenses -- uno de cada cinco individuos -- tiene una discapacidad. Sus contribuciones enriquecen a nuestras comunidades y sociedades mientras viven, trabajan y comparten sus vidas. <br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publications/pfanguage.asp<br />
  6. 6. People-First Language<br />Every individual regardless of sex, age, race or ability deserves to be treated with dignity and respect. As part of the effort to end discrimination and segregation -- in employment, education and our communities at large -- it's important to eliminate prejudicial language. <br />Like other minorities, the disability community has developed preferred terminology -- People First Language. More than a fad or political correctness, People First Language is an objective way of acknowledging, communicating and reporting on disabilities. It eliminates generalizations, assumptions and stereotypes by focusing on the person rather than the disability. <br />As the term implies, People First Language refers to the individual first and the disability second. It's the difference in saying the autistic and a child with autism.  (See the following.) While some people may not use preferred terminology, it's important you don't repeat negative terms that stereotype, devalue or discriminate, just as you'd avoid racial slurs and say women instead of gals. <br />Equally important, ask yourself if the disability is even relevant and needs to be mentioned when referring to individuals, in the same way racial identification is being eliminated from news stories when it is not significant. <br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publications/pfanguage.asp<br />
  7. 7. People-First Language<br />Be sensitive when choosing the words you use. Here are a few guidelines on appropriate language. <br />Recognize that people with disabilities are ordinary people with common goals for a home, a job and a family. Talk about people in ordinary terms. <br />Never equate a person with a disability -- such as referring to someone as retarded, an epileptic or quadriplegic. These labels are simply medical diagnosis. Use People First Language to tell what a person HAS, not what a person IS. <br />Emphasize abilities not limitations. For example, say a man walks with crutches, not he is crippled. <br />Avoid negative words that imply tragedy, such as afflicted with, suffers, victim, prisoner and unfortunate. <br />Recognize that a disability is not a challenge to be overcome, and don't say people succeed in spite of a disability. Ordinary things and accomplishments do not become extraordinary just because they are done by a person with a disability. What is extraordinary are the lengths people with disabilities have to go through and the barriers they have to overcome to do the most ordinary things. <br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publications/pfanguage.asp<br />
  8. 8. Descripción de las personas con discapacidades <br />Sea sensitivo al elegir las palabras que usa. La siguiente es una guía para el lenguaje apropiado.<br />Reconozca que las personas con discapacidades son personas comunes con metas comunes para un hogar, un trabajo y una familia. Hable acerca de las personas en términos comunes. <br />Nunca iguale a una persona con una discapacidad, tal como referiéndose a alguien como retrasado, un epiléptico o cuadripléjico. Estas etiquetas son simplemente el diagóstico médico. Use el lenguage de las personas son primero para decir lo que la persona TIENE y no lo que la persona ES.<br />Ponga el énfasis en las capacidades y no en las limitaciones. Por ejemplo diga, "un hombre que usan muletas," no "el lisiado." <br />Evite palabras negativas que implican tragedia, así como afectado por, sufre de, víctima de, prisionero o desafortunado. <br />Reconozca que una discapacidad no es un reto a sobrepasar, y no diga que las personas triunfan a pesar de su discapacidad. Las cosas comunes no se convierten en extraordinarias sólo porque las hace una persona con una discapacidad. Lo que es extraordinario es por todo lo que pasan las personas con discapacidades y las barreras que tienen que sobrepasar para poder hacer las cosas más simples. <br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publications/pfanguage.asp<br />
  9. 9. People-First Language<br />Use handicap to refer to a barrier created by people or the environment. Use disability to indicate a functional limitation that interferes with a person's mental, physical or sensory abilities, such as walking, talking, hearing and learning. For example, people with disabilities who use wheelchairs are handicapped by stairs. <br />Do not refer to a person as bound to or confined to a wheelchair. Wheelchairs are liberating to people with disabilities because they provide mobility. <br />Do not use special to mean segregated, such as separate schools or buses for people with disabilities, or to suggest a disability itself makes someone special.<br />Avoid cute euphemisms such as physically challenged, inconvenienced and differently abled. <br />Promote understanding, respect, dignity and positive outlooks.<br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publications/pfanguage.asp<br />
  10. 10. Descripción de las personas con discapacidades <br />Use "hándicap" para referirse a la barrera creada por las personas o el ambiente. Use la "discapacidad" para indicar una limitación funcional que interfiere con las capacidades mentales, físicas o sensoriales como caminar, hablar, oír y aprender. Por ejemplo, las escaleras son un impedimento para las personas con discapacidades que usan sillas de ruedas. <br />No se refiera a la persona como atada o confinada a una silla de ruedas. Las sillas de ruedas liberan a las personas con discapacidades porque les proveen movilidad. <br />No use "especial" para significar "segregado," como escuelas o camiones distintos para personas con discapacidades, o para sugerir que la discapacidad misma hace a alguien especial. <br />Evite eufemismos que pretenden ser simpáticos, como minusválido y personas con capacidades diferentes. <br />Promueva comprensión, respeto, dignidad y perspectivas positivas. <br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publications/pfanguage.asp<br />
  11. 11. People-First Language<br />People First Language recognizes that individuals with disabilities are - first and foremost - people.  It emphasizes each person's value, individuality, dignity and capabilities.  The following examples provide guidance on what terms to use and which ones are inappropriate when talking or writing about people with disabilities. <br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publications/pfanguage.asp<br />
  12. 12. Reference: <br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People-first_language<br />http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/resources/publications/pfanguage.asp<br />

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