Transforming for the 21st century

497 views

Published on

In order to be viable in the 21st century, school libraries must transform.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
497
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Start with a quiz: Number your paper 1-4 True or False?
  • True or False?
  • True or False?
  • True or False?
  • True or False? Discuss your responses at your tables. In what ways has the library changed?
  • A couple of years ago, we updated the mission of library services for Mesquite to say: The mission of MISD library programs is to be integral to the learning process in a way that challenges students so that each one is equipped to succeed. Now the time has come to begin work on a new vision. An organization needs a vision in order to: *provide a clear picture of the desired future *build a foundation for setting future directions and determining priorities *provides a bridge from the present to the future There are three reasons that the time is right for developing a new vision.
  • You’ve probably heard of the book The World Is Flat by Thomas Friedman. The book is basically about globalization. Friedman suggests the world is "flat" in the sense that globalization has leveled the competitive playing fields between industrial and emerging market countries. This flattening requires the US to keep updating the skills of its work force. He lists 10 “flatteners” but there are just three that we need to focus on today:
  • Before the advent of the internet, if a person wanted to publish his ideas, he had to convince someone in the publishing industry that there was an audience for his work. The web made it easier to publish your own work, but a person still had to have some technical expertise to make it happen.
  • Today’s Web 2.0 tools allow anyone anywhere to put his thoughts and ideas out there. There are blogs about the most random things, but each one of them has some sort of audience – even if it is just the author’s friends and family.
  • Another way to get your ideas out there is by using a wiki and writing collaboratively. The best known example of this is Wikipedia. If you have expertise on a topic, you can write or contribute to an article for Wikipedia.
  • While there aren’t any public statistics available about how many videos are hosted on YouTube, in 2006 the company said that there were 100 million videos being watched every day. The number of podcast users is expected to be 60 million by 2010. This ability to publish our own content allows us the unprecedented opportunity to offer students the chance to create work for an authentic audience.
  • Librarians have been talking about the information explosion for a long time. The terms information overload, too much information, infoglut are part of everyday language. But did you know how much information is really out there?
  • Did we have less questions to ask “before Google”? Where did we get the answers?
  • An exabyte is a unit of computer storage equal to 1 quintillion bytes. Million Billion Trillion Quadrillion Quintillion
  • In contrast, Britannica has about 230,000 articles or topics covered.
  • Many people are now in constant contact with friends, family and work. The cell phone allows users to talk, but also to e-mail, IM, chat, text, access their social networks – all on the go.
  • Many educators believe that their students don’t have access to technology, but the Pew Internet & American Life project found differently. While they may not have access to a traditional desktop computer, a majority of young adults – particularly Hispanics, have access to text messaging and the web via their cell phones.
  • iPods can be used for many things other than playing music. They can be used as hard disk storage space for PDF files, podcasts, and video files. The latest model, the iPod Touch, can also access the Internet.
  • In the past year, there has been tremendous growth in the VoIP area. Skype leads the way with 246 million registered users. In addition to Skype, there is Gizmo, Yahoo Messenger and AIM – all of which allow you to talk to anyone over the web – audio or video.
  • Most of you have read Marc Prensky’s article Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. If you haven’t read it you must.
  • There have been studies showing that because of their constant access to media and the web, kids brains are actually wired differently than those of us who grew up before there was a computer in most homes.
  • It was previously thought that after the age of 3, the brain did not change very much, but it turns out that idea was wrong. The latest research in neurobiology shows that the brain constantly reorganizes itself based on the various stimuli it receives throughout our lives. This is called neuroplasticity. It is something that is just beginning to be understood by brain researchers.
  • The word malleable means “capable of being altered or controlled by outside forces or influences.” In other words, brain research has also found that they way our brains develop is based on the experiences that we have. The way people think is based on the inputs they receive from the world around them. Children raised with the computer have “hypertext” minds. Their thinking leaps around, rather than progressing sequentially.
  • The parts of the brain that are used when practicing skills required by computer games and using other digital media have been found to be larger and more highly developed than other areas. These are skills having to do with reading visual images as representations of three-dimensional space, multidimensional visual-spatial skills, making mental maps, “inductive discovery” (i.e.  making observations, formulating hypotheses and figuring out the rules governing the behavior of a dynamic representation), “attentional deployment” (such as monitoring multiple locations simultaneously), and responding faster to expected and unexpected stimuli.
  • Another way that young people’s thinking has changed is in their attention spans. Have you ever heard anyone say that someone has “the attention span of a gnat”? It’s almost become a cliché, but it’s not necessarily true
  • Have you ever watched a child play a video game or engage in any other activity that really interests them? It’s not that they can’t pay attention, it’s that they choose not to
  • As a result of their experiences, students today crave interactivity. They want an immediate response to their every action. Traditional schooling does not provide this kind of interactivity. In fact, one study found that students only got to ask a question every 10 hours that they were in school.
  • Have you noticed that kids can watch television, carry on a conversation with a parent in the room, text someone on their cell phone, and do homework at the same time? Even though it is hard for us to believe, they really can multi-task and still know what is going on. Research done for Sesame Street reveals that children do not actually watch television continuously, but “in bursts.” They tune in just enough to get the gist and be sure it makes sense.  In one key experiment, half the children were shown the program in a room filled with toys.  As expected, the group with toys was distracted and watched the show only about 47 percent of the time as opposed to 87 percent in the group without toys.  But when the children were tested for how much of the show they remembered and understood, the scores were exactly the same.  “We were led to the conclusion that the 5-year-olds in the toys group were attending quite strategically, distributing their attention between toy play and viewing so that they looked at what was for them the most informative part of the program.  The strategy was so effective that the children could gain no more from increased attention.
  • Those of us who were raised before the dawn of the information age, see information as a product. It is an end unto itself and not to be changed. Students today, however, see information as a raw material that they can use to create something new.
  • All you have to do is to take a look on Blogger, youtube, Facebook or any other web 2.0 service to see that kids are producing all kinds of creative stuff.
  • Finding information is not the end for students. Information is nothing if you don’t do something with it - put your own individual spin on it.
  • There’s even a name for this – machinima. It involves taking video game characters and making them act in other environments outside their video games.
  • A third reason that we need to consider a new vision for our library programs is the fact that the information landscape has changed. What did the information landscape look like when you were growing up?
  • Now we are networked to all kinds of people, information and services to find that answers that we need. Our network allows us to get a map to somewhere and a list of restaurants in the area. Can you think of other examples?
  • The answers to our questions don’t always come from an expert in the field. Services like Yahoo Answers allow someone to ask a question and other users of the service can answer the question based on their experience. We are connected to a whole bunch of people who have experiences that we don’t and can help us out.
  • E-mail, text messages, Instant message programs, blog postings through RSS, Twitter, facebook – all allow us access to the thinking of our friends and colleagues – even in the middle of the night.
  • There are a plethora of networks available for any interest. We know that MySpace and Facebook are popular social networks for keeping in touch with friends. Ning – a service that allows anyone to create a social network dedicated to anything – has hundreds of thousands of networks you can join. They can be for fun or for professional reasons.
  • While we still have lots of information in print format, the majority of what our students use is in digital format.
  • text, audio, video, images, blogs, wikis etc.
  • What is a book anyway? Audiobook on mp3 Kindle eBook Wiki textbooks
  • This new digital environment of collaboration and creativity requires a new type of licensing. Creative Commons makes being a good digital citizen easier.
  • The new information landscape is the perfect environment for our little digital natives and their craving for interactivity. Here they can get as much feedback and communication as they want.
  • Wikis, blogs, social networks, social bookmarking, online office applications, - all of these allow users to create and work collaboratively.
  • The new information landscape gives us an opportunity to create authentic assignments for students. They can research and write about real problems and share their work with a real audience. The idea of a real audience changes the way students write. It can make them WANT to write.
  • Students can do original research. They can do surveys, polls, communicate with experts and add to current knowledge on a topic.
  • True or False?
  • True or False? Discuss your responses at your tables. In what ways has the library changed?
  • A couple of years ago, we updated the mission of library services for Mesquite to say: The mission of MISD library programs is to be integral to the learning process in a way that challenges students so that each one is equipped to succeed. Now the time has come to begin work on a new vision. An organization needs a vision in order to: *provide a clear picture of the desired future *build a foundation for setting future directions and determining priorities *provides a bridge from the present to the future There are three reasons that the time is right for developing a new vision.
  • Transforming for the 21st century

    1. 1. Transforming for the 21st Century by Mary Woodard
    2. 2. The school library in the 21st century is changing
    3. 3. MISD librarians want to make a difference
    4. 4. We are working with students whose needs have changed
    5. 5. We want to transform our library programs to meet these changing needs
    6. 6. We need to create a new vision for MISD library programs
    7. 7. Our world has changed
    8. 8. Anyone can be a published author
    9. 9. Anyone can create a blog and publish his ideas
    10. 10. Anyone can create a wiki to gather and share information
    11. 11. Anyone can create a video or podcast and share it with the world
    12. 12. People have access to more information than ever before
    13. 13. Google processes about 1 billion searches a day
    14. 14. The web held 5 exabytes of information in 2002
    15. 15. There are more than 2,000,000 articles in Wikipedia in English
    16. 16. Communication is easier than ever before
    17. 17. Hispanics and young adults lead the way with handheld devices Image citation: day 61, http://www.flickr.com/photos/raymundopelayo/2303928644/ , uploaded on March 1, 2008 by Raymond Brown
    18. 18. Apple has sold over 140 million iPods Image citation: Waiting, with tunes, http://www.flickr.com/photos/tereneta/2309669928/ , uploaded on March 3, 2008 by ereneta.
    19. 19. Voice over IP allows free calls over the Internet Image citation: Skype family, http://www.flickr.com/photos/goforchris/2551841142/ , uploaded on June 4, 2008 by goforchris
    20. 20. The way young people think and learn has changed.
    21. 21. Kids’ brains are physically different
    22. 22. Brains organize based on input received
    23. 23. Experiences lead to different brain structures
    24. 24. Repeated experiences cause parts of the brain to be larger and more developed
    25. 25. Kids pay attention only when something is relevant to them
    26. 26. Kids’ attention span is short – for old ways of learning Image citation: Bored…, http://www.flickr.com/photos/foreversouls/5778963/ , uploaded March 2, 2005 by foreversouls
    27. 27. Kids crave interactivity Image citation: www.Army.mil, http://www.flickr.com/photos/soldiersmediacenter/2763147948 / , uploaded August 14, 2008 by soldiersmediacenter
    28. 28. Kids can multi-task Image citation: multi-tasking, http://www.flickr.com/photos/atonal/67391705/, uploaded on November 27, 2005 by atonal
    29. 29. Kids view information as a raw material
    30. 30. Young people are producers of information
    31. 31. Kids believe the value of content is in what you can do with it
    32. 32. Kids love to mix and remix content to make something new
    33. 33. The information landscape has changed
    34. 34. The information landscape is now a network
    35. 35. Answers don’t always come from experts Image citation: DSC_5621 http://www.flickr.com/photos/kiifu/2345232195/ uploaded on March 19, 2008 by kiifu
    36. 36. Friends and colleagues are always available Image citation: Texting http://www.flickr.com/photos/amulligan/266153928/ uploaded on October 10, 2006 by Adam Mulligan
    37. 37. We have different networks for different needs
    38. 38. The information landscape is now digital
    39. 39. Digital information comes in many formats
    40. 40. The notion of what a book is, is shifting Image citation: Amazon Kindle http://www.flickr.com/photos/jblyberg/2073131769/in/set-72157603330853723 uploaded on November 29,2007 by jblyberg
    41. 41. Alternative licensing allows for creativity
    42. 42. The information landscape is now participatory and collaborative
    43. 43. Content is created by the community Image citation: kids these days. All they do is crowd around a computer http://www.flickr.com/photos/rocksee/338054323/ uploaded on December 29, 2006 by rocksee
    44. 44. Students can create for authentic audiences Image citation: My audience http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnmueller/1240811077/ uploaded on August 26, 2007 by Extra Medium
    45. 45. Students can add to the information available
    46. 46. We are working with 21st century students who have changing needs
    47. 47. We want to transform our library programs to meet these changing needs
    48. 48. We need to create a new vision for MISD library programs

    ×