Assignment 5 nation report part 2

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Assignment 5 nation report part 2

  1. 1. Nation Report Part 2: Brazilian Art<br />By: Michael Wittman<br />
  2. 2. Art<br /><ul><li>The oldest paintings found are cave paintings in SerradeCapivara National Park. (pictured above)
  3. 3. In 1816 the Imperial Academy of Fine Arts was formed and this started a revolution in art style for Brazil.
  4. 4. The dominant style in the early 19th century was Baroque, a form of European realism.
  5. 5. Romanticism then became popular which includes paintings of drama, fantasy, and violence.</li></li></ul><li>Art<br /><ul><li>16th century art was Portuguese style due to inhabitants from Portugal.
  6. 6. After Emperor Peter II took over he encouraged paintings that symbolized national identity.
  7. 7. Mid 1800’s paintings showed in interest in death similar to European paintings.
  8. 8. Slavery was never illustrated in any Brazilian paintings.
  9. 9. Victor Meirelles and Pedro Americo were the most important artists of the 18th century.</li></li></ul><li>Art<br /><ul><li> A Week of Modern Art Festival started in 1922 in Sao Paulo and continues to be an annual event.
  10. 10. This was started by the artists Malfatti and Amaraland showcases new styles of art.
  11. 11. In the 1950’s abstractionism became the popular style.
  12. 12. This style uses an artist’s references of an object that they remember and then paint that object according to them.
  13. 13. Most abstract paintings do not appear realistic and this style is on the opposite side of the spectrum as realism.</li></li></ul><li>Sources<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazilian_art<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baroque_in_Brazil<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstractionism<br />

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