Digital Implications for Universities

3,937 views

Published on

As part of the Course to Dis-course online mini-conference, this looks at the impact of digitisation on higher education.

Published in: Education, Technology

Digital Implications for Universities

  1.  
  2. The components in education Content Structure Support Filter Validation Lectures Reading lists Courses Tutorials Assessment Social Cohort Convenience + social recognition
  3. The components in newspapers Content Business Quality Filter Stories Editor Ads Journalists Format Paper Convenience Access Exclusivity
  4. Replaced by … Content Business Quality Filter Blogs Network Craigslist Wikipedia Format Online Relevance Democracy Personal
  5.  
  6. The components in education Content Structure Support Filter Validation Lectures Reading lists Courses Tutorials Assessment Social Cohort Convenience + social recognition
  7. Verdict: Weak Content
  8. Verdict: Weak Filter
  9. Verdict: Medium Structure
  10. Verdict: Weak Social
  11. Verdict: Medium Support
  12. Verdict: Strong Validation
  13. The threat Content Structure Support Filter Validation Net/OER/ databases Search Data mining Peer Marketplace Social Social Network Relevance/Long Tail
  14. We need a revolution right? <ul><li>In a world where technologies change daily and graduates armed with four-year degrees are entering the workforce in record numbers, there is an increasing fear among the Net Generation that a four-year degree will be neither relevant nor suf­ficient preparation when it becomes time to enter the work force (Windham 2005) </li></ul>It is amazing to me how in all the hoopla and debate these days about the decline of education in the US we ignore the most fundamental of its causes. Our students have changed radically. Today’s students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach . (Prensky 2001) the online learning environment is not peripheral, or merely a technological issue for universities and educators to resolve, but rather that it represents the means by which higher education comes to understand the requirements and changes in society, and thus the route by which it maintains its relevance to society (Weller 2008)
  15. The Net Gen myth <ul><li>Change in context – prevalence of ICTs </li></ul><ul><li>Only partial evidence for lack of relevance </li></ul><ul><li>Overestimate net gen skills </li></ul><ul><li>Seeing generational diff where this none: </li></ul>“ they want parameters, rules, priorities, and procedures … they think of the world as scheduled and someone must have the agenda. As a result, they like to know what it will take to achieve a goal. Their preference is for structure rather than ambiguity.” (Oblinger & Oblinger 2005)
  16. But… <ul><li>People are learning in diff ways </li></ul><ul><li>Google, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia stats hint at learning </li></ul><ul><li>Specific communities </li></ul><ul><li>OERs </li></ul>
  17. How similar is education to.. <ul><li>… Music industry? </li></ul><ul><li>… film industry? </li></ul><ul><li>… book publishing? </li></ul><ul><li>… newspapers? </li></ul><ul><li>… health? </li></ul><ul><li>… TV/Radio? </li></ul>
  18. How should we respond? <ul><li>Claims for urgent revolution are overstated </li></ul><ul><li>But… </li></ul><ul><li>We should view it as unprecedented opportunity to facilitate learning different things in different ways </li></ul>
  19. Which means? <ul><li>Embrace openness </li></ul><ul><li>Share, share, share </li></ul><ul><li>Experiment </li></ul><ul><li>Use non-educational technology </li></ul><ul><li>Think beyond the course…. </li></ul>

×