Brain dump

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Abstract: Mind maps, or concept maps, can be useful ways for students to brainstorm possible research topics, making visual connections that might otherwise be difficult to articulate. They give students the chance to experiment and play, with no right or wrong answers. Mind maps have always been possible with traditional tools of pens and paper, but there are so many new possibilities! Visualization is exploding as a teaching opportunity, and free online visualization tools are proliferating. This session will explore the intersection between visual literacy and topic development by demonstrating several tools librarians can use to incorporate mind maps into instruction.

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  • Mind maps, or concept maps, can be useful ways for students to brainstorm possible research topics, making visual connections that might otherwise be difficult to articulate. They give students the chance to experiment and play, with no right or wrong answers. Mind maps have always been possible with traditional tools of pens and paper, but there are so many new possibilities! Visualization is exploding as a teaching opportunity, and free online visualization tools are proliferating. This session will explore the intersection between visual literacy and topic development by demonstrating several tools librarians can use to incorporate mind maps into instruction.
  • Brain dump

    1. 1. Topic development is a difficult concept to teach or learn. Using mind maps can help students who are visual learners. Some free or low-cost examples of mind-mapping tools are in the orange bubbles. At GGU, we revised our topic development lessons with an English language program to include mind maps. With a combination of mind maps to brainstorm possible topics, and individual librarian appointments, professors reported that the quality of research paper topics improved. Experience Experiment! Mind maps come in many forms, from paper and pencil to computer software. For links to tools, sample mind maps, and suggested reading, visit the online handout: http://bit.ly/braindumpwilu Brain Dump: Using Mind Maps for Topic Development Margot Hanson, Golden Gate University | WILU Conference, Regina, Saskatchewan, June 2011

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