Interpretation Plans and Projects What’s YOUR Story?
What is Interpretation? <ul><li>“ Interpretation is a means of communicating ideas and feelings which help people enrich t...
Why an Interpretation Plan? <ul><li>An Interpretation Plan provides a comprehensive long-term strategy, a management tool,...
What does an Interpretation Consultant do? <ul><li>Gathers information </li></ul><ul><li>Undertakes further research  </li...
Can we prepare our own Interpretation Plan? <ul><li>Do you have the time and resources? </li></ul><ul><li>How complex is t...
What’s an Interpretation Project? <ul><li>Usually identified by an Interpretation Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Includes: </li></...
Exhibititions
Face to Face - Guides SATC
Re-enactments TWA
Multi-Media: interactives,  pod-casts, DVD DEC
Sculpture / Public Art DEH SA TWA
Community Art
Reconstructions TWA
Monuments & Memorials
Plaques
Interpreting What’s no longer there
Trails
Sources of Grants <ul><li>Dept Culture and Arts –  State   </li></ul><ul><li>National Library of Australia – Community Her...
Lotterywest  Heritage Grants
Lotterywest Grants <ul><li>Valuing our State’s Heritage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conservation of Cultural Heritage  </li></ul...
Interpretation of Cultural Heritage <ul><li>Annual grant round </li></ul><ul><li>Projects aimed at understanding and inter...
Successful  Interpretation  Plans: <ul><li>A highly significant site or building </li></ul><ul><li>A demonstrated need for...
Successful Interpretation Projects: <ul><li>Good planning based on, or already given priority by, an interpretation plan <...
Shire of Lake  Grace  Interpretation Project <ul><li>Part of a bigger project “The Storytrail” </li></ul><ul><li>Research,...
 
City of Kalgoorlie Boulder Interpretation Project <ul><li>Town Halls Centenary Exhibitions </li></ul><ul><li>Design and in...
Shire of Nannup  - Totem Poles  Community based project Combined with Community Art Project Design and Construction of eig...
The application <ul><li>NFP or Local Govt body  </li></ul><ul><li>Interpretation Plan or Project </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss...
Questions
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Interpretation Intro And Grants 2010

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An introduction to Cultural Heritage Planinng and Projects and the Lotterywest grants program

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  • Sharing our Stories pages 27
  • Gather information from everyone – museum volunteers, local govt, tourism operators, schools, traditional owners, community groups etc Discovers the interesting stories, iconic objects Undertakes further research through Battye library, State Records Office, previous historical research, local studies collections etc. Ensures there is something there for every visitor demographic Advise on the latest techniques of Interpretation and what is most suitable and affordable Can work with other professionals such as architects, landscapers, exhibition designers Suggests themes and stories and links with objects, oral histories etc.
  • See sections 4 5 &amp; 6 in “Sharing our Stories” Do you have a good team of volunteers/paid staff who can lead the project – be realistic? Steps: P28 – Research an analysis of background information Analysis of site visitors and issues Audience profiling Consult with stakeholders Identification of stories Interpretation strategies Prioritised list of projects Implementation Timetable Identification of implementation resources need
  • Conservation of Cultural Heritage Conservation of Cultural Heritage Grants help community groups to conserve part of the State&apos;s cultural heritage. Lotterywest invites applications for its Conservation of Cultural Heritage Grants through an annual funding round. The annual closing date for the round is in November each year (see Grant Round Diary for details). Applications must be received or postmarked no later than the closing date for the grant round. Grants are available for urgent conservation work on places or objects of significant heritage value, as well as for the preparation of Conservation or Treatment Plans. Conservation of Natural Heritage Conservation of Natural Heritage Grants are available to support community organisations to conserve the State&apos;s natural habitats and diversity. Examples of projects that may be considered are: Revegetation activities and the protection of remnant vegetation Flora and fauna surveys Management plans for reserves Public education projects such as the production of brochures etc. Research projects which will assist in the conservation of Western Australia&apos;s biodiversity Community Histories Go to the Grant Round Diary   for grant round dates. Lotterywest&apos;s Community Histories Grants aim to help communities to record and share their history, as a way of maintaining their sense of identity and heritage. Lotterywest invites expressions of interest for its Community Histories Grants through an annual grant round.  The expression of interest must be received or postmarked no later than the closing date for the grant round. A project may record the history of people living in a particular place or may focus on a community of interest.  It could look at a local theme or the local experience of a broader event or movement. The history of an organisation, activity or event that made a significant contribution to, or had a significant impact on, your community will also be considered. Grants can be considered towards the cost of research, writing, collation and production. We can also support the cost of obtaining professional advice to guide the early stages of the project. General Grants, including for Museums and Historical Societies Lotterywest may consider proposals for capital works, equipment, planning or project costs for heritage-related activities where these fall outside what might be supported under the Conservation, Interpretation or Community Histories grants rounds. Applicants will need to demonstrate that: They are adhering to good historical/heritage/museum practice. They are seeking appropriate professional advice to shape their proposal. The local government authority or other partners, where appropriate, are supportive and/or providing assistance with the proposal.
  • Lotterywest invites applications for its Interpretation of Cultural Heritage Grants through an annual grant round.  The annual closing date for each round is in July each year (see Grant Round Diary for details). Applications must be received or postmarked no later than the closing date for the grant round. Interpretation of Cultural Heritage Grants aim to help communities to develop an understanding of the significance of their cultural heritage places and objects, as a way of maintaining their sense of identity and heritage. The total budget available for this grant area is limited.  $15,000 is usually the maximum amount that can be granted to any one project.
  • Tips for Successful Grant Applications Interpretation Plan funding – reasons for success include: A highly significant site or building A demonstrated need for an interpretation plan A well thought-out plan, with enough detail given A plan that will assist in promoting enhanced heritage practice Community interest demonstrated by visitor numbers Support from local government Demonstrated willingness to take advice after a previously unsuccessful application Interpretation project funding - reasons for success include: Good planning based on, or already given priority by, an interpretation plan An innovative and interactive approach A unique approach that breaks stereotypes Strong support from Indigenous groups Development of outreach programs Interpretation plan funding – why grant applications fail: Not enough detail about plan No brief for consultant No detailed quote Need is not demonstrated Preferred consultants don’t have relevant skills and experience Narrow focus – eg. only Anglo-Australian heritage in a culturally diverse district Insufficient engagement with Indigenous groups Community benefit unclear No letters of support to indicate community interest No demonstrated willingness to take advice after a previously unsuccessful application Funds could be sourced from other sponsors Interpretation project funding – why grant applications fail: Not enough detail about the project No evidence of good planning and how the project sits within your broader planning framework No demonstrated willingness to take advice after a previously unsuccessful application No production schedule
  • Story Traill: Visually link significant heritage sites with local tourist attractions, whilst drawing attention to the history of restored and/or remnants of important sites and buildings. The plan proposes three interpretation methods and media suited to the space and particular sites: Pavement – text and/or images inscribed in pavers (18 sites) Major artworks at six key sites Interpretative signage of demolished/destroyed buildings/sites/vegetation (9 sites) These works will be explored through two themes: the community’s relationship with the land; and the relationships local people have with the place and how this is carried through stories and collective memory. 1 st phase Interp plan Collecting stories – community workshops – articles in paper re specific buildings. Generating responses getting stories behind – form Design – by July 18 sites, pavers - installed 9 signs 6 public art works
  • Research is happening now Launch – Centennial Celebrations planned for June 22 nd Series of 10 pull up banners for each hall. People, events – highlights Eg – Boulder – Eileen Joyce world famous pianist. Cyclone at Kalgoorlie during construction Cognizant of Heritage buildings requirements.
  • Interpretation Intro And Grants 2010

    1. 1. Interpretation Plans and Projects What’s YOUR Story?
    2. 2. What is Interpretation? <ul><li>“ Interpretation is a means of communicating ideas and feelings which help people enrich their understanding and appreciation of their world and their role in it.” </li></ul><ul><li>(Interpretation Australia Association) </li></ul><ul><li>Good Interpretation: </li></ul><ul><li>Concerned with sharing memories and experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>Respects connections between people and place </li></ul><ul><li>Communication vs information </li></ul><ul><li>Example of an Interpretation Plan: </li></ul><ul><li>City of Claremont </li></ul>
    3. 3. Why an Interpretation Plan? <ul><li>An Interpretation Plan provides a comprehensive long-term strategy, a management tool, for ensuring the heritage significance of places, structures, objects or traditions can be communicated </li></ul><ul><li>Interpretation of cultural heritage is based on application of established principles and procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Needs to resonate with a wide audience </li></ul><ul><li>The Interpretation Plan together with the Conservation Plan is the fundamental document that will successfully guide the development of your site, collection or organisation </li></ul>
    4. 4. What does an Interpretation Consultant do? <ul><li>Gathers information </li></ul><ul><li>Undertakes further research </li></ul><ul><li>Discovers the interesting stories, iconic objects </li></ul><ul><li>Suggests themes and stories and links with objects, oral histories etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensures there is something there for every visitor demographic </li></ul><ul><li>Advise on the latest techniques of Interpretation and what is most suitable and affordable </li></ul><ul><li>Works with other professionals </li></ul>
    5. 5. Can we prepare our own Interpretation Plan? <ul><li>Do you have the time and resources? </li></ul><ul><li>How complex is the site/collection </li></ul><ul><li>Steps to take: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consultation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Profiling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the Stories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Implementation Plan – Interpretation Projects </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Consider doing some of the work and engaging a consultant to review </li></ul>
    6. 6. What’s an Interpretation Project? <ul><li>Usually identified by an Interpretation Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Includes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Signage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Didactic panels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guides/Tours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reenactments/Performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Visual Art/Sculpture/Community Art </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Music/Sound </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Written Interpretation/story telling/yarns/poetry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multi-media/pod-cast/web-site </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Treat as a project – project team/project plan/budget/implement/evaluate </li></ul>
    7. 7. Exhibititions
    8. 8. Face to Face - Guides SATC
    9. 9. Re-enactments TWA
    10. 10. Multi-Media: interactives, pod-casts, DVD DEC
    11. 11. Sculpture / Public Art DEH SA TWA
    12. 12. Community Art
    13. 13. Reconstructions TWA
    14. 14. Monuments & Memorials
    15. 15. Plaques
    16. 16. Interpreting What’s no longer there
    17. 17. Trails
    18. 18. Sources of Grants <ul><li>Dept Culture and Arts – State </li></ul><ul><li>National Library of Australia – Community Heritage Grants - Federal </li></ul><ul><li>Lotterywest – State </li></ul><ul><li>Community Arts Network WA – State & Federal </li></ul><ul><li>Other Sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regional Development Authorities - State </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Area Consultative Committees – Federal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heritage & Cultural Tourism – State </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Lotterywest Heritage Grants
    20. 20. Lotterywest Grants <ul><li>Valuing our State’s Heritage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conservation of Cultural Heritage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gordon Reid Conservation of Natural Heritage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community Histories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>General Grants for Heritage Projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other general grants </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Interpretation of Cultural Heritage <ul><li>Annual grant round </li></ul><ul><li>Projects aimed at understanding and interpreting the significance of heritage places and objects </li></ul><ul><li>Administered by MAWA </li></ul><ul><li>Application close early July </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment process through Aug/Sep </li></ul><ul><li>Announcements November </li></ul>
    22. 22. Successful Interpretation Plans: <ul><li>A highly significant site or building </li></ul><ul><li>A demonstrated need for an interpretation plan </li></ul><ul><li>A well thought-out plan, with enough detail given </li></ul><ul><li>A plan that will assist in promoting enhanced heritage practice </li></ul><ul><li>Community interest demonstrated by visitor numbers </li></ul><ul><li>Support from local government </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrated willingness to take advice after a previously unsuccessful application </li></ul>
    23. 23. Successful Interpretation Projects: <ul><li>Good planning based on, or already given priority by, an interpretation plan </li></ul><ul><li>An innovative and interactive approach </li></ul><ul><li>A unique approach that breaks stereotypes </li></ul><ul><li>Strong support from Indigenous groups </li></ul><ul><li>Development of outreach programs </li></ul>
    24. 24. Shire of Lake Grace Interpretation Project <ul><li>Part of a bigger project “The Storytrail” </li></ul><ul><li>Research, design and install a series of pavers in main street outside significant buildings </li></ul>Themes: community’s relationship with the land; and the relationships local people have with the place and how this is carried through stories and collective memory
    25. 26. City of Kalgoorlie Boulder Interpretation Project <ul><li>Town Halls Centenary Exhibitions </li></ul><ul><li>Design and installation of displays to celebrate the centenaries </li></ul>
    26. 27. Shire of Nannup - Totem Poles Community based project Combined with Community Art Project Design and Construction of eight totem poles representing different aspects of Nannup Cultural Heritage
    27. 28. The application <ul><li>NFP or Local Govt body </li></ul><ul><li>Interpretation Plan or Project </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss your project with Lotterywest and MAWA </li></ul><ul><li>Include ALL the documents requested </li></ul><ul><li>Consultants Brief and detailed quotes </li></ul><ul><li>Include any Management, Strategic, or Conservation Plans or Significance Assessments </li></ul><ul><li>If part of an ongoing project –e.g. phase 2, include a report on the previous project implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Submit on time! </li></ul><ul><li>Start NOW! </li></ul>
    28. 29. Questions

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