Ten Most Wanted:
Hunting down missing information
about cultural artefacts
Presented by
Susan Lambert ∙ Marcus Winter ∙ Ph...
Ten Most Wanted
A research project with three partners:

The Museum of Design in Plastics
Arts University Bournemouth
Susa...
Ten Most Wanted

1. The problem we address
2. Research aspects
3. Design decisions
4. How it works
5. Wrap up
Ten Most Wanted
In the absence of maker’s marks,
packaging or additional information, we
are left only with the intrinsic ...
Ten Most Wanted
Who?

Where?

Designed by?

Made by?
Ten Most Wanted
Collections can contain many thousands,
or even tens of thousands of artefacts.
So where to begin?
Ten Most Wanted
Jeff Howe, 2005

Credit: Random House Business
Ten Most Wanted
Where do we fit in?
Classification

Correction &
Transcription

Co-curation
Oomen &
Aroyo (2011)
Complemen...
Ten Most Wanted
What’s new?
Game-based crowd-sourcing: types of participation

Casual games

Exploratory games
Ridge (2011...
Ten Most Wanted
Research questions
ote and facilitate
How to design, prom
R1 collections?
dsourcing games for
complex crow...
Ten Most Wanted
The FBI focus the search and ask the public.
www.fbi.gov/wanted/topten
Ten Most Wanted
So we borrowed from the FBI
www.10most.org.uk
Ten Most Wanted
Social media channels were established
to promote the discussions.
Facebook group
10mostinvolved
Google+
T...
Ten Most Wanted
Social media APIs are used to pull the
posts into the website home page.
Ten Most Wanted
Posts are then filtered into the
individual object pages.
Key discoveries in the investigation
are recorde...
Ten Most Wanted
Case notes are an important part of
the process.
1.Visitors can see progress without
reading the entire na...
Ten Most Wanted
Credits earn points and points
earn prizes.
Hall of Fame
Promotion
Certificate
Opportunity to manage cases...
Ten Most Wanted
Players are asked to agree to our
Terms & Conditions on sign-up.
These are summarised in three
bullet poin...
Ten Most Wanted
Case number - AIBDC : 005528
Designer
Manufacturer
Country
Date
Dimensions
Materials
Method
Inscription

U...
Ten Most Wanted
Playing the game…
Ten Most Wanted
Playing the game…
Ten Most Wanted
Making the case

[…]
Ten Most Wanted
What we have learnt so far:
1.Case notes seem a good way to
> summarise findings
> present evidence
> cred...
Ten Most Wanted

http://10most.org.uk/

slambert [at] aub.ac.uk
marcus.winter [at] brighton.ac.uk
phil.blume [at] adaptive...
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Ten Most Wanted: Hunting down missing information about cultural artefacts Marcus Winter, University of Brighton; Susan Lambert, Arts University Bournemouth; Phil Blume, Adaptive Technologies

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Ten Most Wanted develops a game-based approach to crowdsourcing certain aspects of curatorial research, including the discovery and verification of previously undocumented facts about collection items. Rather than presenting artefacts as removed from people’s lives and explained only by experts, it encourages players of the game to find out and tell experts what they know about the artefacts and why this knowledge is important.

The Museums Computer Group 'Museums on the Web' conference 2013 (UKMW13)
https://twitter.com/search?q=%23ukmw13
Tate Modern, 15 November 2013.
The theme for UKMW13 was ‘Power to the people’.

The Museums Computer Group: connecting, supporting, inspiring museum technology professionals.

Published in: Education, Technology
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Ten Most Wanted: Hunting down missing information about cultural artefacts Marcus Winter, University of Brighton; Susan Lambert, Arts University Bournemouth; Phil Blume, Adaptive Technologies

  1. 1. Ten Most Wanted: Hunting down missing information about cultural artefacts Presented by Susan Lambert ∙ Marcus Winter ∙ Phil Blume
  2. 2. Ten Most Wanted A research project with three partners: The Museum of Design in Plastics Arts University Bournemouth Susan Lambert, Museum Head Interactive Technologies Research Group University of Brighton Dr Lyn Pemberton, Reader Marcus Winter, Research Fellow Adaptive Technologies Limited Phil Blume, Project Manager
  3. 3. Ten Most Wanted 1. The problem we address 2. Research aspects 3. Design decisions 4. How it works 5. Wrap up
  4. 4. Ten Most Wanted In the absence of maker’s marks, packaging or additional information, we are left only with the intrinsic properties of size, colour, material and process.
  5. 5. Ten Most Wanted Who? Where? Designed by? Made by?
  6. 6. Ten Most Wanted Collections can contain many thousands, or even tens of thousands of artefacts. So where to begin?
  7. 7. Ten Most Wanted Jeff Howe, 2005 Credit: Random House Business
  8. 8. Ten Most Wanted Where do we fit in? Classification Correction & Transcription Co-curation Oomen & Aroyo (2011) Complementing Collection Contextualisation
  9. 9. Ten Most Wanted What’s new? Game-based crowd-sourcing: types of participation Casual games Exploratory games Ridge (2011) Multi-user Single-user Ridge (2011) Crowd Community Haythornthwaite (2009)
  10. 10. Ten Most Wanted Research questions ote and facilitate How to design, prom R1 collections? dsourcing games for complex crow R2 - How to integ ra content with cur te user-generat ated col e lection d d a ta ? R3 - How to deal with IPR issues in a transparent, non-limiting, user-friendly way?
  11. 11. Ten Most Wanted The FBI focus the search and ask the public. www.fbi.gov/wanted/topten
  12. 12. Ten Most Wanted So we borrowed from the FBI www.10most.org.uk
  13. 13. Ten Most Wanted Social media channels were established to promote the discussions. Facebook group 10mostinvolved Google+ Ten Most Wanted Twitter @TenMost
  14. 14. Ten Most Wanted Social media APIs are used to pull the posts into the website home page.
  15. 15. Ten Most Wanted Posts are then filtered into the individual object pages. Key discoveries in the investigation are recorded in the case notes.
  16. 16. Ten Most Wanted Case notes are an important part of the process. 1.Visitors can see progress without reading the entire narrative. 2.The key discoveries are recorded in our own domain. 1.This evidence is summarised in a museum context. 2.Contributors can be credited by name.
  17. 17. Ten Most Wanted Credits earn points and points earn prizes. Hall of Fame Promotion Certificate Opportunity to manage cases Opportunity to blog Invitation to our Summer Party
  18. 18. Ten Most Wanted Players are asked to agree to our Terms & Conditions on sign-up. These are summarised in three bullet points linked to a long form document. Put simply, a contributor owns their own stuff and we have IPR clearance to use it.
  19. 19. Ten Most Wanted Case number - AIBDC : 005528 Designer Manufacturer Country Date Dimensions Materials Method Inscription Unknown - Wanted Byson UK 1920 - 1959 (circa) - Wanted height 38 mm width 135 mm depth 20 mm plastic, phenol formaldehyde, bakelite - generic term compression moulded ""Byson" Design and method of manufacture Pat. in England & Abroad No. 392800. Tested and approved. Serial 924. Good Housekeeping Institute. Conducted by Good Housekeeping Magazine." (Under clip)
  20. 20. Ten Most Wanted Playing the game…
  21. 21. Ten Most Wanted Playing the game…
  22. 22. Ten Most Wanted Making the case […]
  23. 23. Ten Most Wanted What we have learnt so far: 1.Case notes seem a good way to > summarise findings > present evidence > credit players 2.Game mechanics and reward structures are a difficult topic due to participants’ different backgrounds and motivations 3.The “crowd” has amazing expertise
  24. 24. Ten Most Wanted http://10most.org.uk/ slambert [at] aub.ac.uk marcus.winter [at] brighton.ac.uk phil.blume [at] adaptivetechnologies.com

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