Caring for your introvert: Close Reading

4,762 views

Published on

Close reading presentation for the essay "Caring for Your Introvert"

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Caring for your introvert: Close Reading

  1. 1. Caring for Your Introvert Close Reading
  2. 2. Introductions <ul><li>A good introduction does three things: </li></ul><ul><li>It uses a “hook” to get the reader’s attention </li></ul><ul><li>It lets the reader know what attitude the writer is taking toward the topic </li></ul><ul><li>It needs to make clear the main idea (or thesis) </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>How does the writer “hook” the reader’s interest? </li></ul><ul><li>What point of view is the writer using? What attitude gets conveyed? </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Do you know someone who needs hours alone every day? Who loves quiet conversations about feelings or ideas, and can give a dynamite presentation to a big audience, but seems awkward in groups and maladroit at small talk? Who has to be dragged to parties and then needs the rest of the day to recuperate? Who growls or scowls or grunts or winces when accosted with pleasantries by people who are just trying to be nice? </li></ul><ul><li>If so, do you tell this person he is &quot;too serious,&quot; or ask if he is okay? Regard him as aloof, arrogant, rude? Redouble your efforts to draw him out? </li></ul><ul><li>If you answered yes to these questions, chances are that you have an introvert on your hands—and that you aren't caring for him properly . </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Do you know someone who needs hours alone every day? Who loves quiet conversations about feelings or ideas, and can give a dynamite presentation to a big audience, but seems awkward in groups and maladroit at small talk? Who has to be dragged to parties and then needs the rest of the day to recuperate? Who growls or scowls or grunts or winces when accosted with pleasantries by people who are just trying to be nice? </li></ul><ul><li>If so, do you tell this person he is &quot;too serious,&quot; or ask if he is okay? Regard him as aloof, arrogant, rude? Redouble your efforts to draw him out? </li></ul><ul><li>If you answered yes to these questions, chances are that you have an introvert on your hands—and that you aren't caring for him properly. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Transition to the body <ul><li>After suggesting that “you” aren’t taking proper care of “your” introvert, the writer makes a transition to first person point of view. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>If you are behind the curve on this important matter, be reassured that you are not alone. Introverts may be common, but they are also among the most misunderstood and aggrieved groups in America, possibly the world. </li></ul><ul><li>I know. My name is Jonathan, and I am an introvert. </li></ul><ul><li>Oh, for years I denied it. After all, I have good social skills. I am not morose or misanthropic. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>One source of power in writing is parallelsim —repeating a pattern. </li></ul><ul><li>(Also referred to as “parallel structure” ) </li></ul><ul><li>Find an example of parallelism . </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Are introverts misunderstood? Wildly. That, it appears, is our lot in life. &quot;It is very difficult for an extrovert to understand an introvert,&quot; write the education experts Jill D. Burruss and Lisa Kaenzig. (They are also the source of the quotation in the previous paragraph.) Extroverts are easy for introverts to understand, because extroverts spend so much of their time working out who they are in voluble, and frequently inescapable, interaction with other people. They are as inscrutable as puppy dogs. But the street does not run both ways. Extroverts have little or no grasp of introversion. They assume that company, especially their own, is always welcome. They cannot imagine why someone would need to be alone; indeed, they often take umbrage at the suggestion. As often as I have tried to explain the matter to extroverts, I have never sensed that any of them really understood. They listen for a moment and then go back to barking and yipping. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Are introverts misunderstood? Wildly. That, it appears, is our lot in life. &quot;It is very difficult for an extrovert to understand an introvert,&quot; write the education experts Jill D. Burruss and Lisa Kaenzig. (They are also the source of the quotation in the previous paragraph.) Extroverts are easy for introverts to understand, because extroverts spend so much of their time working out who they are in voluble, and frequently inescapable, interaction with other people. They are as inscrutable as puppy dogs. But the street does not run both ways. Extroverts have little or no grasp of introversion. They assume that company, especially their own, is always welcome. They cannot imagine why someone would need to be alone; indeed, they often take umbrage at the suggestion. As often as I have tried to explain the matter to extroverts, I have never sensed that any of them really understood. They listen for a moment and then go back to barking and yipping. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Unity <ul><li>Read the following paragraph, paying attention to its unity . </li></ul><ul><li>That is, everything in the paragraph relates to one topic : extroverts don’t understand introverts. </li></ul><ul><li>To write unified paragraphs, it helps to start with a topic sentence that makes clear what the paragraph is about. </li></ul><ul><li>What is this paragraph’s topic sentence? </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Are introverts misunderstood? Wildly. That, it appears, is our lot in life. &quot;It is very difficult for an extrovert to understand an introvert,&quot; write the education experts Jill D. Burruss and Lisa Kaenzig. (They are also the source of the quotation in the previous paragraph.) Extroverts are easy for introverts to understand, because extroverts spend so much of their time working out who they are in voluble, and frequently inescapable, interaction with other people. They are as inscrutable as puppy dogs. But the street does not run both ways. Extroverts have little or no grasp of introversion. They assume that company, especially their own, is always welcome. They cannot imagine why someone would need to be alone; indeed, they often take umbrage at the suggestion. As often as I have tried to explain the matter to extroverts, I have never sensed that any of them really understood. They listen for a moment and then go back to barking and yipping. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Are introverts misunderstood? Wildly. That, it appears, is our lot in life. &quot;It is very difficult for an extrovert to understand an introvert,&quot; write the education experts Jill D. Burruss and Lisa Kaenzig. (They are also the source of the quotation in the previous paragraph.) Extroverts are easy for introverts to understand, because extroverts spend so much of their time working out who they are in voluble, and frequently inescapable, interaction with other people. They are as inscrutable as puppy dogs. But the street does not run both ways. Extroverts have little or no grasp of introversion. They assume that company, especially their own, is always welcome. They cannot imagine why someone would need to be alone; indeed, they often take umbrage at the suggestion. As often as I have tried to explain the matter to extroverts, I have never sensed that any of them really understood. They listen for a moment and then go back to barking and yipping. </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>The paragraph continues this essay’s style of introducing topics with questions rather than with statements, so its topic sentence is in the form of a question: Are introverts misunderstood? </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Part of what makes this essay fun to read is that it has an attitude . </li></ul><ul><li>Though it’s factual, it’s not just straight information. The writer’s stance comes across. </li></ul><ul><li>How does the writer communicate an attitude toward extroverts? </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>Are introverts misunderstood? Wildly. That, it appears, is our lot in life. &quot;It is very difficult for an extrovert to understand an introvert,&quot; write the education experts Jill D. Burruss and Lisa Kaenzig. (They are also the source of the quotation in the previous paragraph.) Extroverts are easy for introverts to understand, because extroverts spend so much of their time working out who they are in voluble, and frequently inescapable, interaction with other people. They are as inscrutable as puppy dogs. But the street does not run both ways. Extroverts have little or no grasp of introversion. They assume that company, especially their own, is always welcome. They cannot imagine why someone would need to be alone; indeed, they often take umbrage at the suggestion. As often as I have tried to explain the matter to extroverts, I have never sensed that any of them really understood. They listen for a moment and then go back to barking and yipping. </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>Are introverts misunderstood? Wildly. That, it appears, is our lot in life. &quot;It is very difficult for an extrovert to understand an introvert,&quot; write the education experts Jill D. Burruss and Lisa Kaenzig. (They are also the source of the quotation in the previous paragraph.) Extroverts are easy for introverts to understand, because extroverts spend so much of their time working out who they are in voluble, and frequently inescapable , interaction with other people. They are as inscrutable as puppy dogs . But the street does not run both ways. Extroverts have little or no grasp of introversion. They assume that company, especially their own , is always welcome. They cannot imagine why someone would need to be alone; indeed, they often take umbrage at the suggestion. As often as I have tried to explain the matter to extroverts, I have never sensed that any of them really understood. They listen for a moment and then go back to barking and yipping . </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul><li>Skillful writers often use figurative language to make their writing more vivid. </li></ul><ul><li>Where is figurative language used in this paragraph? </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Are introverts misunderstood? Wildly. That, it appears, is our lot in life. &quot;It is very difficult for an extrovert to understand an introvert,&quot; write the education experts Jill D. Burruss and Lisa Kaenzig. (They are also the source of the quotation in the previous paragraph.) Extroverts are easy for introverts to understand, because extroverts spend so much of their time working out who they are in voluble, and frequently inescapable, interaction with other people. They are as inscrutable as puppy dogs. But the street does not run both ways. Extroverts have little or no grasp of introversion. They assume that company, especially their own, is always welcome. They cannot imagine why someone would need to be alone; indeed, they often take umbrage at the suggestion. As often as I have tried to explain the matter to extroverts, I have never sensed that any of them really understood. They listen for a moment and then go back to barking and yipping. </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>Are introverts misunderstood? Wildly. That, it appears, is our lot in life. &quot;It is very difficult for an extrovert to understand an introvert,&quot; write the education experts Jill D. Burruss and Lisa Kaenzig. (They are also the source of the quotation in the previous paragraph.) Extroverts are easy for introverts to understand, because extroverts spend so much of their time working out who they are in voluble, and frequently inescapable, interaction with other people. They are as inscrutable as puppy dogs. But the street does not run both ways. Extroverts have little or no grasp of introversion. They assume that company, especially their own, is always welcome. They cannot imagine why someone would need to be alone; indeed, they often take umbrage at the suggestion. As often as I have tried to explain the matter to extroverts, I have never sensed that any of them really understood. They listen for a moment and then go back to barking and yipping. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Literary Glossary: Conceit <ul><li>A conceit is a fanciful expression, usually an extended metaphor or a surprising analogy between seemingly dissimilar objects. A conceit displays intellectual cleverness due to the unusual comparison being made. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Conclusions <ul><li>A good conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Stresses the importance of the main idea or thesis </li></ul><ul><li>Gives the essay a sense of closure </li></ul><ul><li>Leaves a final impression on the reader </li></ul>
  23. 23. <ul><li>How can I let the introvert in my life know that I support him and respect his choice? First, recognize that it's not a choice. It's not a lifestyle. It's an orientation. </li></ul><ul><li>Second, when you see an introvert lost in thought, don't say &quot;What's the matter?&quot; or &quot;Are you all right?&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Third, don't say anything else, either. </li></ul>

×