Dcdguivwa resource manual2001

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Dcdguivwa resource manual2001

  1. 1. Standard Section name Manual A manual incorporating standards for best practice in management of volunteer-involving programs Volunteering Western Australia Phone: (08) 9420 7288 Fax: (08) 9420 7289 Email: community@volunteer.org.au Website: www.volunteer.org.au Volunteer Resource
  2. 2. 2 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Contents Introduction 3 Standard One: Policies and Procedures 8 Checklist 8 General information 11 Sample 15 Template 16 Standard Two: Management Responsibility 18 Checklist 18 General information 21 Samples 26 Standard Three: Recruitment Selection and Orientation 28 Checklist 28 General information 31 Samples 44 Templates 54 Standard Four: Work and the Workplace 63 Checklist 63 General information 66 Samples 76 Templates 85 Standard Five: Training and Development 102 Checklist 102 General information 105 Samples 112 Templates 116 Standard Six: Service Delivery 123 Checklist 124 Samples 126 Standard Seven: Documentation and Records 135 Checklist 135 General information 138 Samples 145 Templates 147 Standard Eight: Continuous Improvement 149 Checklist 149 Feedback Form 152 Index 153
  3. 3. Introduction 3 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Introduction Volunteering Western Australia has great pleasure in introducing the new Volunteer Resource Manual that incorporates the last edition of the Volunteer Standards Manual. This valuable and practical publication is now a living document that will develop in line with future community needs, leading research, legislative changes and contributions from member organisations and individuals. Its new presentation in an electronic CD format will allow regular and rapid updates and changes for the benefit of all users. Earlier hardcopy editions were developed as distance education packages for members of Volunteering WA and others seeking to deliver support services to the community. With the ongoing impacts of the 2001 International Year of Volunteers and the dynamic growth of established, new and emerging Volunteer Resource Centres across the State, the Volunteer Resource Manual will complement the development and implementation of organisational policy, planning and procedures. The past and present commitment of researchers, trainers, managers, committees, coordinators and community leaders will ensure that strong networks continue to develop quality services and best practices in both regional and metropolitan areas. Through broad consultation with interested groups at a national, regional and local level, Volunteering Western Australia is confident that the manual is both user-friendly and recognises the National Standards for volunteer-involving organisations, produced by Volunteering Australia and launched during 2001. The commitment and support of all contributors to the new Volunteer Resource Manual must be fully recognised. Over many years the shared information and creativity of Volunteer Centres and volunteer- involving organisations across Australia have led to the development of the acknowledged National Standards. Within Western Australia itself these standards have been incorporated into a modern resource that is highly relevant to our diverse community needs, changing demographics and geographical expanse. Much of the credit for the latest research and production of this CD must go to the program managers of Volunteering Western Australia, especially the Services Development and Metropolitan Outreach divisions. We hope you will find this manual of value and of assistance with the future implementation of best practice. Please regard it as your resource and we always welcome feedback and practical suggestions for advancing volunteering for the benefit of the Western Australian community. Alan Melchert Executive Director Volunteering WA
  4. 4. 4 Introduction V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Acknowledgements Volunteering WA, incorporated as the Volunteer Centre of Western Australia, acknowledges support from the Government of Western Australia through the Department for Community Development, the Commonwealth Department for Family and Community Services, and Lotterywest. Volunteering Western Australia would like to thank the participants who were involved in the development of this Volunteer Resource Manual. The following people gave up their time to attend a consultation on the development of the manual as well as provided samples for the resource manual. Jumae Atkinson Department of Veterans Affairs Sandy Beardwood Brightwater Care Group Jodie Crane Southcare Joanne Cutten Australian Red Cross Diane Forrester Rocky Bay Deb Furnell Kwinana Home Support Service Jean Garrett-Reed Mercy Community Services Ann Geling Kwinana Home Support Service Phylis Hardy Peel Volunteer Resource Centre Darren Johnston Volunteer Task Force Jan Mayze Armadale Home Help Service Sian Owen Volunteer Task Force Kaye Read Kwinana Home Support Service Julia Routledge Anglican Homes Paula Wilkins RAAFA Aviation Museum John Rea Volunteering WA Wendy Walters Peel Volunteer Resource Centre Louise Weaver Volunteering WA The Volunteer Resource Manual has been prepared by John Rea, Metropolitan Outreach Services Manager, and Louise Weaver, Services Development Manager, of Volunteering Western Australia.
  5. 5. 5 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Introduction How to use this manual This manual contains eight sections incorporating the National Standards for involving volunteers. To assist users of the manual to develop their own volunteer systems the Volunteer Resource Manual has been divided into 3 distinct sections within each standard: a. a summary of the Standard including a user friendly checklist and general information about the criteria within the standards b. samples providing relevant examples developed by managers and coordinators of volunteers c. templates that can be used and modified for use within your agency. Volunteering WA is constantly looking for new material for the Volunteer Resource Manual. If you have a sample or some information that you wish to provide please forward to Volunteering WA. Introduction to National Standards The National Standards for Volunteer involvement in Not-for-Profit Organisations represent what Volunteering Australia regards as best practice in the management of volunteers. The standards have evolved from consultations and focus groups organised across Australia in 1996-97 and a national review panel has now been established to guide their ongoing development. Format of the standards The standards cover the following aspects of volunteer involvement: 1 Policies and procedures 5 Training and development 2 Management responsibilities 6 Service delivery 3 Recruitment 7 Documentation and records 4 Work and the workplace 8 Continuous improvement Each standard contains a brief statement that defines the scope of the standard and a set of criteria accompanies the standard. Notes to the standards The standards describe what elements should be part of a best practice system for managing volunteers. This approach recognises that the needs of organisations involving volunteers vary and that the design and implementation of a management system must reflect the unique conditions and circumstances of an organisation. Uses of the standards Not-for-profit organisations can use the national standards in a number of ways: • As an audit tool that provides an overall appreciation of where the organisation is placed with respect to best management practice for volunteer involvement • As a guideline or checklist to help identify opportunities for making improvements • As a framework of reference to assist in planning and establishing a new volunteer service • As a baseline from which progress in making improvements can be monitored and measured Adapted from National Standards for involving volunteers in not for profit organisations, Volunteering Australia, 2001. This resource manual has been developed using best endeavours. Please advise Volunteering WA if you consider any material unethical or inappropriate. We will be reviewing the manual regularly and welcome your feedback.
  6. 6. 6 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Introduction National Standards for Involving Volunteers in Not for Profit Organisations STANDARD 1: Policies and Procedures An organisation that involves volunteers shall define and document its policies and procedures for volunteer involvement and ensure that these are understood, implemented and maintained at all levels of the organisation where volunteers are involved. STANDARD 2: Management Responsibilities An organisation that involves volunteers shall ensure that volunteers are managed within a defined system and by capable personnel with the authority and resources to achieve the organisation’s policy goals. STANDARD 3: Recruitment Selection and Orientation An organisation that involves volunteers shall plan and have clearly documented volunteer recruitment, selection, and orientation policies and procedures that are consistent with non-discriminatory practices and guidelines. STANDARD 4: Work and the Workplace An organisation that involves volunteers shall clearly specify and control the work of volunteers and ensure that their place of work is conducive to preserving their health, safety and general well-being. STANDARD 5: Training and Development An organisation that involves volunteers shall ensure that volunteers obtain the knowledge, skills, feedback on work, and the recognition needed to effectively carry out their responsibilities. STANDARD 6: Service Delivery An organisation that involves volunteers shall ensure that appropriate processes and procedures are established and followed for the effective planning, control, and review of all activities relating to the delivery of services by volunteers. STANDARD 7: Documentation and Records An organisation that involves volunteers shall establish a system and have defined procedures to control all documentation and personnel records that relate to the management of volunteers. STANDARD 8: Continuous Improvement An organisation that involves volunteers shall plan and continually review its volunteer management system to ensure that opportunities to improve the quality of the system are identified and actively pursued. Adapted from National Standards for involving volunteers in not for profit organisations, Volunteering Australia, 2001.
  7. 7. Standard Section name quote Standard One Policies and Procedures An organisation that involves volunteers shall define and document its policies and procedures for volunteer involvement and ensure that these are understood, implemented and maintained at all levels of the organisation where volunteers are involved.
  8. 8. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 8 Acknowledgement to Volunteer Centre of Victoria Information Kit. This standard is concerned with the organisation clearly setting out its vision, direction and operational framework for involving volunteers. What is the intent of this standard? The intent of this standard is for an organisation to clarify its underlying philosophy for involving volunteers and establish a policy and procedural framework that will provide direction and structure to the way volunteers are managed. Within the framework, an organisation should ensure that its practices are consistent with certain basic principles for involving volunteers. For example, practices should be in line with the definition and principles of volunteering, the rights and responsibilities of volunteers and volunteer-involving agencies, the codes of practice and the National Standards. The standard specifically requires the development of: • A general policy that commits the organisation to establishing an effective system for managing volunteers • Management system policies that state the organisation’s intentions with respect to key elements of the volunteer management system • Operational procedures that describe how the policies of the organisation will be accomplished At each of these levels the standard requires that volunteer policies be (1) defined, (2) documented, (3) understood by those whom the policies affect, (4) implemented and (5) maintained. Having developed and implemented these policies and procedures, the standard further states that they be reviewed at intervals determined by the organisation as appropriate to ensure that they remain relevant and effective. Standard 1: Policies and Procedures An organisation that involves volunteers shall define and document its policies and procedures for volunteer involvement and ensure that these are understood, implemented and maintained at all levels of the organisation where volunteers are involved. Below is a checklist for you to determine how well you are achieving this Standard. General policy The organisation has a written general policy for the involvement of volunteers. The policy clearly states the organisation’s: • General philosophy on volunteer involvement • Commitment to establishing and maintaining a quality system for managing volunteers • Broad objectives for involving volunteers • Lines of authority and accountability for managing and implementing the quality system Standard One Policies and Procedures
  9. 9. 9 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia The general volunteer policy affirms the organisation’s compliance with: • The definition and principles of ‘formal volunteering’ • The rights of volunteers • The Model Code of Practice for organisations involving volunteers • The National Standards for involving volunteers in not for profit organisations • Any recognised standards that may be relevant to the specific functions of the agency The general volunteer policy is made widely available and understood throughout the entire organisation. Management system policies The organisation has written policies covering key activities of the system for managing volunteers. Key activities may typically include: • Developing policies and procedures • Fulfilling management responsibilities • Managing the work and workplace of volunteers • Recruiting volunteers • Training and developing volunteers • Managing volunteer delivered services • Maintaining documentation and record keeping • Continually improving the management system The management system policies are: Consistent with the organisation’s general policy Simply and clearly stated Made available to, and understood by, all volunteers Operating procedures The organisation has written procedures that support and supplement the policies. Such procedures may include: • Policy/procedure development and review • Management system reviews • Pre-employment reference checks and/or police checks • Use of, and access to, confidential personal information • Use of private motor vehicles and insurance • Volunteer grievances • Planning and conducting system audits • Volunteer recognition • Volunteer appraisal/feedback • Volunteer screening, interview and selection • Controlling system documentation Standard One Policies and Procedures
  10. 10. 10 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Adapted from National Standards for involving volunteers in not for profit organisations’ Volunteering Australia, 2001. Standard One Policies and Procedures These procedures: Describe how the policies are to be implemented or controlled Are made available to, and understood by volunteers, on a needs to know basis Are simply stated, and presented in accordance with an agreed and consistent format Policy and procedure reviews The organisation reviews and evaluates its general volunteer policy, management system policies and operating procedures at sufficient intervals. The procedures are established and maintained for making changes and additions to policies and procedures. The procedures should ensure that any changes are: • Based on an identified and agreed need for change • Communicated to, and understood by, those who they are relevant to • Implemented and maintained Effective systems are established for incorporating the views of volunteers when reviewing and updating policies and procedures. Records of all policy and procedure reviews and changes are kept and dated for future reference.
  11. 11. 11 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia GeneralInformation 11 Standard One Policies and Procedures Developing a volunteer policy What is a policy? A policy is a statement of intent which sets out clearly an organisation’s views with respect to a particular matter or course of action. A policy can also be a set of guidelines which outline what a service will provide and how it will go about providing it. A volunteer policy guides the actions of the organisation and provides a rationale for those actions. It establishes continuity and affirms the status and legitimacy of volunteers within the organisation. What should a volunteer policy contain? A volunteer policy should reflect the philosophy and state the mission or purpose of the organisation, and establish its commitment to volunteer involvement. It could contain, for example, statements on: • reimbursement • grievance and disciplinary procedures • commitment to training • volunteer rights and responsibilities • insurance • support mechanisms • industrial considerations • the relationship between paid and unpaid workers • the principle of equal opportunity • areas of volunteer involvement and the time commitment • occupational health and safety • if appropriate, the rationale for police and medical checks. A volunteer policy should be written in consultation with: • Management • Paid workers • Volunteers • End users/consumers • Other agencies or networks. In addition to your volunteer policy you should also have: • Principles of volunteering • A code of practice incorporating a statement of volunteer rights and responsibilities • A procedures manual which contains information on such things as reimbursement, insurance, grievance procedures, health and safety regulations • Forms which have been developed to provide mechanisms to support the procedures set down in the manual, eg travel reimbursement, insurance, incident, personnel and attendance forms
  12. 12. 1212 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Writing a Policy When writing your policy the following should be taken into consideration: • definition of volunteering • principles of volunteering • rights and responsibilities of volunteers • rights and responsibilities of volunteer involving agencies • model codes of practice Definition of Formal Volunteering Formal volunteering is an activity which takes place in not for profit organisations or projects, and is undertaken: • to be of benefit to the community and the volunteer • of the volunteer’s own free will and without coercion • for no financial payment • in designated volunteer positions only Principles of Volunteering • Volunteering benefits the community and the volunteer • Volunteer work is unpaid • Volunteering is always a matter of choice • Volunteering is not compulsorily undertaken to receive pensions or government allowances • Volunteering is a legitimate way in which citizens can participate in the activities of their community • Volunteering is a vehicle for individuals or groups to address human, environmental and social needs • Volunteering is an activity performed in the not for profit sector • Volunteering is not a substitute for paid work • Volunteering respects the rights, dignity and culture of others • Volunteering promotes human rights and equality Volunteer Rights Unlike paid staff, volunteer staff are not covered by award conditions or work place agreements. Volunteers, however, do have rights, which the volunteer involving agency is responsible for providing. The following is a list outlining the rights of a volunteer. Volunteers have the right: • to work in a healthy and safe environment (refer Occupational Health and Safety Act[s]); • to be interviewed and employed in accordance with equal opportunity and anti discrimination legislation • to be adequately covered by insurance • to be given accurate and truthful information about the organisation for which they are working • to be reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses incurred on behalf of the organisation for which they are working • to be given a copy of the organisation’s volunteer policy and any other policy that affects their work; • not to fill a position previously held by a paid worker Standard One Policies and Procedures
  13. 13. 13 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia • not to do the work of paid staff during industrial disputes • to have a position description and agreed working hours • to have access to a grievance procedure • to be provided with orientation to the organisation • to have confidential and personal information dealt with in accordance with the principles of the Privacy Act 1988 (Privacy Amendment Act 2000) • to be provided with sufficient training in order to carry out the work Volunteer Responsibilities Volunteers have the responsibility to: • be dependable. If unable to attend, give adequate notice and try to assist in finding a replacement; • be willing to undertake relevant training and orientation pertaining to tasks that are to be performed; • ensure that confidential information is respected and treated appropriately • be open to other points of view • seek assistance, guidance or information where necessary and receive constructive feedback as appropriate • work as members of a team • report any incident to their supervisor that appears unusual • report any accident to their supervisor no matter how insignificant it may seem • use reasonable judgement in making a decision and check with their supervisor or leader if unsure • respect the rights, privacy and dignity of clients and fellow workers • deal fairly and impartially with all clients • employ necessary precautions to ensure the safety of both themselves and the client • abide by the rules and regulations of the agency Volunteer involving agencies rights and responsibilities Not only do volunteers have rights and responsibilities, but volunteer involving agencies also have rights and responsibilities. Agency Rights Agencies have the right to expect volunteers to: • be dependable. If unable to attend, give adequate notice and try to assist in finding a replacement • be willing to undertake relevant training and orientation pertaining to tasks that are to be performed • ensure that confidential information is respected and treated appropriately • be open to other points of view • seek assistance, guidance or information where necessary and receive constructive feedback as appropriate • work as members of a team • report any incident to their supervisor that appears unusual • report any accident to their agency supervisor no matter how insignificant it may seem • use reasonable judgement in making a decision and check with their supervisor or leader if unsure • respect the rights, privacy and dignity of clients and fellow workers • deal fairly and impartially with all clients • employ necessary precautions to ensure the safety of both themselves and the client • abide by the rules and regulations of the agency Standard One Policies and Procedures
  14. 14. 14 Policies and Procedures Agencies also have the right to assess the capabilities of volunteers and say no to potential volunteers. Agency Responsibilities Volunteer involving agencies are responsible for providing: • a healthy and safe environment (refer Occupational Health and Safety Act[s]) • interviews and employment in accordance with equal opportunity and anti discrimination legislation • adequate insurance cover • accurate and truthful information about the organisation • reimbursement for out-of-pocket expenses incurred on behalf of the organisation • a copy of the organisation’s volunteer policy and any other policy that may affect the work of volunteers • job descriptions and agreed working hours • access to grievance procedures • orientation, training and support • confidentiality and personal information dealt with in accordance with the principles of the Privacy Act 1988 (Privacy Amendment Act 2000) Standard One V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia
  15. 15. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 15 Samples Policies and Procedures SAMPLE Standard One Volunteer Policy Anglican Homes Volunteer Policy 1. POLICY 1.1 Formal volunteering is an activity which takes place in not-for-profit organisations or projects and is undertaken: • To be of benefit to the community and the volunteer • Of the volunteer’s own free will and without coercion • For no financial payment • In designated volunteer positions only (Taken from Formal definition of a Volunteer, Volunteering Australia 2001) RATIONALE: With the recruitment of caring and appropriate volunteers Anglican Homes will enhance the service provided by paid staff to residents. 1.2 Anglican Homes recognises and places great importance on the value and skills of volunteers. Volunteers may include members of families, parishes, schools, community groups and businesses. 1.3 Volunteers neither replace nor threaten the security of employment of paid staff. Rather, volunteers support staff and residents by providing services which would otherwise not exist. Volunteers complement the functions of paid staff and enhance the quality of services provided by Anglican Homes. 1.4 Volunteers are recruited in accordance with Anglican Homes procedures. 1.5 Volunteers are covered by personal accident and injury while undertaking legitimate volunteer work for Anglican Homes. Acknowledgement to Anglican Homes (Inc).
  16. 16. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 16 Templates Policies and Procedures Standard One Volunteer Recognition Procedure [insert agency name] [insert agency name] [insert agency name] [insert agency name] [insert own communication sources] “A climate of mutual trust, recognition and support for and between staff and volunteers will be fostered.” 1. ____________________________________ will recognise the contributions made by volunteer staff in the Annual Report, and the monthly Newsletter. 2. ____________________________________ will recognise the contributions made by volunteer staff during National Volunteer Week, and International Volunteer Day. 3. Individual managers/coordinators will be responsible for acknowledging volunteer contribution and effort through praise, encouragement, extra support, and additional training. 4. Volunteer staff at ____________________________ will be recognised with a certificate, presented by the Executive Director, or program Manager, after 3 months of service. 5. Volunteer staff will be formally acknowledged after one year of service. Acknowledgement will include an item such as ____________________________________________________ 6. Volunteers will be recognised for specific training they have completed, and for significant and outstanding service. The form of recognition will be the decision of the individual Manager. 7. Volunteer staff will have birthdays and other significant events acknowledged eg Manager will give/send a birthday card. 8. Volunteers will be recognised as valued team members with opportunity to have input into decision-making processes. This may take the form of written suggestions/feedback, verbal suggestions, or special forums/meetings where volunteers are given the opportunity to provide feedback. 9. Volunteers will be kept up to date with developments and information about through the morning briefings, the weekly bulletin, the staff noticeboard and __________________________ 10. Upon notification of a volunteer leaving ________________________________________ some form of recognition will be provided eg a card wishing the volunteer well in their future endeavours. This can be given publicly on the volunteers last day. In the case of a volunteer leaving suddenly, a card can be forwarded on through the mail. 11. In the event of a volunteer leaving ____________________________________________ an Exit Interview will be conducted. This interview will allow the volunteer to give feedback on their volunteering experiences at [insert agency name], and will provide the coordinator with an opportunity to thank the volunteer for their efforts and provide verbal recognition. [insert agency name] Acknowledgement to Volunteering Western Australia.
  17. 17. Standard Two Management Responsibility An organisation that involves volunteers shall ensure that volunteers are managed within a defined system and by capable personnel with the authority and resources to achieve the organisation’s policy goals.
  18. 18. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 18 Standard Two Management Responsibility This is one of the most important standards to implement effectively. If management gives practical effect to the vision and direction set out in the organisation’s policies, then all other standards will fall into place. What is the intent of this standard? The intent of this standard is for the organisation to establish a management system that is capable of effectively implementing volunteer policy directions. The standard allows an organisation to structure its management system in any way it sees fit, so long as the intent and requirements of the standard is met and the system is effective in producing good outcomes for volunteers and the customers of volunteers. The requirements for this standard are basic to good management practice and include: • establishing a management system that is able to meet all appropriate standards and has clear and understood lines of responsibility; • ensuring that the system is able to identify and effectively manage any existing or potential areas of risk; • defining who is directly responsible and has authority for implementing and maintaining the management system; • fulfilling community expectations in areas such as the environment, ethical practices, accountability for expenditure of public monies, public health and safety; • reviewing the management system to ensure it is meeting the organisation’s policy objectives; • ensuring that the management system is sufficiently resourced to enable it to function effectively. *Standard 2: Management Responsibility An organisation that involves volunteers shall ensure that volunteers are managed within a defined system and by capable personnel with the authority and resources to achieve the organisation’s policy and goals Below is a checklist for you to determine how well you are achieving this Standard. Management system The organisation has an identifiable and defined system for managing volunteers. The system for managing volunteers is the primary means by which volunteer policies are implemented and maintained. Means are established for ensuring that the volunteer management system conforms to the requirements of the National Standards that the organisation has deemed appropriate to its operations.
  19. 19. 19 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Reasons are documented where the National Standards are not considered appropriate to the operations of the organisation. The organisation applies systematic risk management processes and practices to the task of identifying, analysing, assessing and monitoring risk for such areas as: • Volunteer/customer dissatisfaction • Unfavourable publicity • Mismanagement • A threat to physical safety of volunteers/customers • Failure of equipment or computer systems • A breach of legal or contractual responsibility • Fraud • Deficiencies in financial controls and reporting • Effective methods are established to treat, avoid or minimise emerging or potential risks. • Lines of reporting and communication are clearly defined for all areas where volunteers are involved Authority and responsibility The organisation has a designated manager with defined authority and responsibility to implement and maintain the volunteer program. The authority and responsibility of the volunteer manager is documented and dated in a duty statement. The duty statement should include: • Key areas of responsibility • Decision making authority • Lines of accountability • Skills required (eg education, experience, training) The organisation has determined the required level of competence, experience and training of the volunteer manager. The volunteer manager holds a position in the organisations overall management structure that is at an appropriate level considering the scope, nature and extent of responsibility. The volunteer manager is involved in all organisational decisions likely to affect volunteers and the volunteer management system. Social responsibilities The volunteer management system observes social and legal responsibilities to the community for such matters as: • Conservation of the environment • Ethical and non-discriminatory management practices • Accountability for expenditure of public monies • Contributing to the knowledge base and general development of the volunteer sector • Public health and safety Standard Two Management Responsibility
  20. 20. 20 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Social responsibilities to the community Are reflected in the organisations volunteer policies Reviews are conducted at appropriate intervals and appropriate actions taken Management review The organisation reviews the suitability and effectiveness of the volunteer management system at appropriate intervals. The review should typically include: • Evaluations of the overall effectiveness of the management system in achieving its stated policies • Evaluations of internal audits of key elements of the volunteer management system • Considerations for updating the management system in relation to changes in strategic direction, resource allocation decisions, increased understanding of actual operations and improvements made in operating processes The results, findings, and recommendations of the management review are: Documented and brought to the attention of the organisations management Records are kept and maintained Resources In order for the volunteer management system to be effectively implemented, maintained and reviewed, the organisation: Allocates appropriate and sufficient resources Allocates appropriate time to the volunteer manager Has an identifiable budget Involves the volunteer manager in the planning, negotiation and utilisation of the budget Provides sufficient clerical, and administration resources and support Has an established method for identifying and addressing the training and development needs of the manager The volunteer manager has opportunities to access: • Appropriate professional development and training • Relevant external learning and support networks Standard Two Management Responsibility Acknowledgement to National Standards for involving volunteers in not for profit organisations, Volunteering Australia, 2001.
  21. 21. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia GeneralInformation 21 Standard Two Management Responsibility The Volunteer Budget Volunteers are a cost effective means of providing quality service delivery. They must not be seen simply as a means of saving money. As a manager of volunteers you should ensure that your organisation recognises the cost of volunteer involvement. For example if the volunteer policy states that volunteers will be reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses or travel, this should be substantiated in the budget. Built into the budget, should be items such as: Salary on costs (full or pro rata) for coordinator/manager/administrative support • Rent • Telephone • Postage/printing • Stationery • Volunteer reimbursement/recognition • Insurance • Training • Equipment • Publicity/advertising • Catering Support must come from the top for appropriate budget allocation if a volunteer program is to be successful. IMPORTANT: Include provision in your budget for National Volunteer Week (second week in May) and International Volunteer Day, 5th December.
  22. 22. 22 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Standard Two Management Responsibility Funding Sources Many funding bodies, both government and private, have money available for community projects. Each body has its own guidelines for granting funding. Directories of Funding Programs The Grant Referral Directory is produced by the Department of Local Government and Regional Development. It provides details of grants provided by State and Commonwealth Government and private sector information for regional and metropolitan communities, business and local government. 08 9217 1500 www.dlgrd.wa.gov.au/assistance/assist.htm The Australian Directory of Philanthropy published by Philanthropy Australia Inc, is a comprehensive reference on sources of non- government funding in Australia. It includes: An index of organisations listed by fields of interest Accessible information about trusts, foundations and corporate funds 03 9620 0200 www.philanthropy.org.au Australian Grants Register The Australian Grants Register is an A-Z of Australian Grants 9228 0882 www.grantsearch.com/book.html GrantsLink Information on Federal Government grant programs is available from GrantsLink which is an initiative set up to make it easier to find relevant Federal Government grants for community projects. 1800 026 222 www.grantslink.gov.au State Government funding programs The following state government agencies have grant programs in keeping with their portfolio interests. Lotterywest Funds a wide range of community projects 08 9340 5270 www.lotterywest.wa.gov.au Healthway Provides grants to health and research organisations as well as sponsorship to sport, arts, racing and community groups that encourage healthy lifestyles and advance promotion programs. 08 9476 7000 www.healthway.wa.gov.au ArtsWA 08 9224 7310 www.artswa.wa.gov.au Country Arts 08 9481 0077 www.countryartswa.asn.au Department For Community Development www.communitydevelopment.wa.gov.au Department of Environmental Protection 08 9222 7000 www.epa.wa.gov.au The Department of Indigenous Affairs 08 9235 8000 www.dia.wa.gov.au Office of Multicultural Interests 08 9426 8690 www.omni.wa.gov.au
  23. 23. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 23 Standard Two Management Responsibility Department of Racing. Gaming and Liquor Gaming Community Trust Grants Program The money credited to the Trust Fund is derived from unclaimed winnings that are payable from gaming and betting that have not been claimed within 12 months. Next round of funding is at the beginning of 2004. Details will be posted on: www.rgl.wa.gov.au Department of Sport and Recreation 08 9387 9700 www.dsr.wa.gov.au Department of Training 08 9325 9322 www.training.wa.gov.au Women’s Policy Development Office 08 9264 1920 www.wa.gov.au/wpdo Youth Grants WA 08 9476 2000 www.youthaffairs.wa.gov.au Federal Government Funding Sources Department of Family and Community Services’ Stronger Families and Community Strategy 1300 653 227 www.facs.gov.au Other funding sources A range of non-government and private sources also exist. These include: The Foundation for Young Australians focuses primarily on the development and implementation of strategic grant programs designed to effect positive, sustained change in the lives of young people who are disadvantaged. 03 9670 5436 www.youngaustralians.org Myer Foundation works to build a fair, just, creative and caring society by supporting initiatives that promote positive change in Australia, and in relation to its regional setting. 03 9207 3040 United Way (WA) Inc is a non sectarian, non political organisation affiliated to a host of autonomous offices worldwide and is committed to helping a wide range of human and health care organisations throughout WA. 08 9325 5505 In Western Australia, a number of service organisations have funding available for community projects: • Apex • Lions International • Rotary International
  24. 24. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 24 Standard Two Management Responsibility Categories of Receipts and Payments Outlined below are the categories that Volunteering Western Australia uses for receipts and payments. You may wish to use these categories, and add some of your own. Salaries Other staff costs Superannuation Workers compensation Staff training Mileage Communications Postage Telephone Fax Advertising Promotional material Subscriptions Services/contracts Insurance Legal fees Rent Other services/contracts Consumables Stationery Printing General consumables Office Electricity/gas Purchases Plant and equipment Other payments Funding grants Membership Donations Saleable items Training Miscellaneous Receipts Payments
  25. 25. 25 Standard Two V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Management Responsibility Risk management Every non-profit organisation faces a certain amount of risk, whether it’s ensuring the health and well- being of their volunteers or protecting their premises. What is a risk? Risk is virtually anything that threatens or limits the ability of a community or non-profit organisation to achieve its mission. It can be unexpected and unpredictable events such as destruction of a building, the wiping of all your computer files, loss of funds through theft or an injury to a member or visitor who trips on a slippery floor and decides to sue. Any of these or a million other things can happen, and if they do they have the potential to damage your organisation, cost you money, or in a worst case scenario, cause your organisation to close. What is a risk management? Risk management is a process of thinking systematically about all possible risks, problems or disasters before they happen and setting up procedures that will avoid the risk, or minimise its impact, or cope with its impact. It is basically setting up a process where you can identify the risk and set up a strategy to control or deal with it. It is also about making a realistic evaluation of the true level of risk. The chance of a tidal wave taking out your annual beach picnic is fairly slim. The chance of your group’s bus being involved in a road accident is a bit more pressing. Risk management systems Setting up risk management systems is about preparing some written procedures to be put in place to ensure you know what, how, and when action has been undertaken or is to be undertaken – and by whom. While it is important that your risk management plan takes in as many possibilities as possible, it is also important that your system be easily understood by your management team. To be effective, it has to be workable. Risk management resources Two comprehensive Risk Management resources have been published in 2003. For a step by step guide to managing risk in your organisation, check out the following resources. • Running the Risk? Risk management tool for volunteer involving organisations. Published by Volunteering Australia. Copies can be down loaded from www.volunteeringaustralia.org • Can you risk it? An introduction to risk management for community organisations. Published by Risk Cover, Insurance Commission of WA. Information can be obtained from www.icwa.wa.gov.au • Helps Sheets on risk management are available from www.ourcommunity.com.au Acknowledgement to www.ourcommunity.com.au
  26. 26. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 26 Samples Standard Two Management Responsibility SAMPLE Coordinators’ Network The Coordinators’ Network provides coordinators and managers of volunteers the opportunity to discuss issues pertaining to volunteer management, and keeps the sector informed about developments within volunteering. Vision Striving for excellence in the coordination and management of volunteer services. Mission The Coordinators Network will provide opportunities for coordinators and managers of volunteers to learn, share experiences and contribute to the development of volunteering. Objectives 1. Sharing of information and experiences, discussion and problem solving at a strategic level. 2. Involvement and influence in current developments affecting volunteering. 3. Supporting each other in issues relating to the management of volunteers. 4. The opportunity to have a collective and strong voice and provide feedback to VWA and Government. 5. Promotion of the Coordinators Network, and other VWA opportunities for Coordinators and Managers of volunteers, at all levels. Meeting times: 9.30 am to 12 midday Meetings are held at Volunteering WA, City West Lotteries House 2 Delhi Street, West Perth WA It is advisable to attend the Introduction to the Centre and a Principles, Policies and Planning session before attending the Coordinators’ Network, as these sessions will give you a sound background to participate in the Network Meetings. If you are new to your position as a coordinator of volunteers, or have not been to a Coordinators’ Network meeting before, and would like to attend, please contact louise@volunteer.org.au. Alternatively, to discuss any questions you may have, please phone (08) 9420 7288 and ask for Louise Weaver. An orientation to the Network will be organised for you. Acknowledgement to Volunteering Western Australia.
  27. 27. Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation An organisation that involves volunteers shall plan and have clearly documented volunteer recruitment, selection, and orientation policies and procedures that are consistent with non-discriminatory practices and guidelines.
  28. 28. 28 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia This standard addresses the area that many organisations involving volunteers find the most difficult: that is, attracting and retaining volunteers. What is the intent of this standard? The intent of this standard is to ensure that the process of recruiting volunteers (1) is non- discriminatory, (2) is controlled in terms of following established procedures, and (3) meets the needs of both volunteers and the organisation. The standard is based on the premise that a planned and systematic approach to recruiting and selecting volunteers will provide the organisation with the best possible basis for attracting and keeping the optimum number of effective volunteers. Specifically, the standard requires that an organisation: • plans its volunteer recruitment and selection strategies based on the collection and analysis of factual data • handles all expressions of interest in volunteering in a non-discriminatory and expeditious manner • properly informs potential volunteers about the organisation, including how and to whom application for a volunteer position can be made • develops appropriate procedures to screen applicants and control the selection process • provides volunteers with an orientation program as soon as possible after joining the organisation Taken from National Standards for Involving volunteers in not for profit organisations Volunteering Australia, 2001. STANDARD 3: Recruitment, Selection and Orientation An organisation that involves volunteers shall plan and have clearly documented volunteer recruitment, selection, and orientation policies and procedures that are consistent with non discriminatory practices and guidelines. Below is a checklist for you to determine how well you are achieving this Standard. Policy and planning The organisation has a written policy on the recruitment, selection and orientation of volunteers. The policy should cover: • Objectives and rationale for recruiting, selecting and orientating • Volunteers are recruited in designated volunteer positions • Compliance with equal employment opportunity principles and practices, including advertising material The responsibility and authority for implementing and maintaining the policy is clearly designated. Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation
  29. 29. 29 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Information is collected that is relevant to planning for volunteer recruitment and selection. Examples of this information include: • Optimal number of volunteers the organisation wishes to recruit and can effectively manage at one time • The nature of the work and the positions to be held by volunteers • The knowledge, skills and attributes required of volunteers to perform the work • Potential sources and methods of recruitment, and the relative effectiveness of each • Alternative methods of advertising for volunteers • Other options for applicants not selected for volunteer positions • Legal requirements to be met (eg equal opportunity) Information collected is analysed and used to assist in planning and implementing volunteer recruitment and selection strategies. The organisation has: A contact person responsible for dealing with initial volunteer position inquiries. The contact person is appropriately trained to respond to inquiries. All inquiries from potential volunteers are acknowledged. Relevant material is distributed in response to inquiries. Examples of this material includes: • Details about the organisation (mission, purpose etc) • Types of volunteer positions available and the nature of the work • An application form (if applicable) • The knowledge, skills and attributes required • Clear instructions on how, when and where to apply • Name and telephone number of the contact person Appropriate procedures are developed and maintained to screen the suitability of applicants for volunteer positions. Documented selection criteria are developed for each volunteer position. Procedures are established and maintained to control volunteer selection. Examples of procedures include: • Developing and reviewing selection criteria • Determining who should conduct interviews • Dealing with participants who do not meet the criteria for positions • Following up personal references • Checking credentials • Making the selection decision • Advising successful and unsuccessful applicants • Referring unsuccessful applicants to appropriate alternative avenues to pursue other volunteer work • Handling and storing application and selection documentation • Evaluating the recruitment and selection process Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation
  30. 30. 30 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Provision is made for volunteers to undergo police checks prior to undertaking work that involves direct and unsupervised contact with vulnerable members of society. Appropriate procedures are established and maintained for carrying out these police checks. Volunteer orientation The organisation provides an orientation for newly appointed volunteers. An orientation may typically cover: • The organisation’s mission, goals and activities • The organisation’s commitment to the definition and principles of volunteering, the rights of volunteers, the model code of practice for organisations involving volunteers, and the national standards for involving volunteers • The role, functions and responsibilities of volunteers • The structure of the volunteer management system • Relevant operating policies, procedures and work forms • The lines of authority, accountability and communication • An introduction to risk management and health and safety issues • Legal and statutory requirements • Introductions to other volunteers and staff • A guided tour of the building, site or office as appropriate • Confidentiality and customer rights • Volunteer training calendar or timetable • Familiarisation with volunteer amenities, work conditions and entitlements The orientation of volunteers includes an information package that covers all key aspects of the volunteer management system appropriate to volunteers. New volunteers receive the orientation program as soon as possible after recruitment to the organisation. Responsibility and authority for the planning and implementation of volunteer orientation is clearly designated. Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation Adapted from National Standards for involving volunteers in not for profit organisations, Volunteering Australia, 2001.
  31. 31. GeneralInformation 31 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment of Volunteers Process • Identify need for volunteers • Identity the motivators you can satisfy • Prepare the Job Description • Write the Catch Phrase • Advertise and publicise • Interview, Screen and Select • Place and Match • Orientate and Train • Review and Evaluate Recruitment Planning Only when the program has been planned and has the support of paid staff is it time to commence a recruitment drive. Ensure that dates for interviews and advertising, for example, are agreed by all involved. Organisations vary in the way they recruit volunteers. Some have specific recruitment drives conducted at regular intervals, whilst others take on new volunteers continuously. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. Choose the one that best suits your organisation, your resources and the sort of people you want to attract. When to Recruit When specific needs and skills have been defined the active recruitment of volunteers can be initiated. Some points to consider about timing are: • Recruit when paid staff and regular volunteers are free to assist the new volunteers • Don’t attempt to recruit when things are going badly – more new people only add to existing stress • Recruit at the right time for your target group, for example, the time of year, prevailing weather conditions, or school holidays will impact on their willingness to become volunteers Where to Recruit The position description should provide an indication of the needs, interests and motivations of the people you prefer to attract – your target group. This can help you locate where your target group may be found. For example, young people can be found through schools, youth clubs, TAFE colleges and universities; unemployed people can be reached through the Centrelink and Job Network programs; and a special interest group can be contacted through an appropriate newsletter, or SkillsBank at Volunteering WA. The mass media is often best used to promote the services you offer but it can be effective in recruiting volunteers in a general way. Take care when dealing with the media as often the information you submit may be severely edited and the context of the story altered by the time it goes to press. Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation
  32. 32. 32 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Acknowledgement to Volunteering NSW. Local newspapers are usually helpful with free publicity if it can include a public interest story involving a local resident. Popular magazines can also be persuaded to write human interest articles for publicity purposes. Radio and television stations often provide short community service announcements and are encouraged to provide community access. Local publicity can be gained from local shop windows, libraries, school notice boards, supermarket boards, doctors, dentists, banks, community health centres, etc. A small poster with an eye catching message in simple appealing language will attract prospective volunteers to take a closer look and follow up. Word of mouth is still one of the best methods of attracting people, therefore the best recruiters are enthusiastic staff and happy volunteers, as well as satisfied service users. Volunteer Referral Agencies or Volunteer Centres in your locality assist your recruitment drive. The Advertised Message Your message to attract volunteers has to compete with the large quantity of information that we are all subjected to every day. Getting the message across has become an art form. Private enterprise and government services spend a great deal of money developing messages that will gain our attention. • Have a short catchy phrase to attract attention • Appeal to the target group • Be very specific, stating exactly what is required • Indicate possible benefits to the volunteer (ie What’s in it for me??) • Avoid “Help” and “Desperate” tones in the message and riding on guilt; use a light touch • Provide a contact name, address and telephone number for inquiries Preparing for the Response All the very best planning and advertising can go awry if the first person the prospective volunteer speaks to in your organisation, knows nothing or little of your recruitment drive, or is unable to provide the information required. Ensure that you have information ready for those who are likely to answer the telephone or receive callers. Make sure that a suitably trained person is responsible for dealing with initial volunteer position inquiries. A recruitment kit complete with information relating to the organisation, an application form and job description can be posted out to applicants. Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation
  33. 33. 33 V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Adverts in a Nutshell First principles: Before you advertise, think about why someone would want to volunteer for you and who you need to attract. Be clear about the role that volunteers play in your organisation. Short but sweet: Provide enough information to interest people but keep it short enough to maintain their attention. Explain the need: Start with a ‘statement of need’ that tells people about your work and why it is important – rather than focusing on your need for volunteers – this makes potential volunteers stop and think “somebody should do something about that”. Avoid jargon: Give details of what you want your volunteers to do in a clear and accessible way. Terms like ‘advocate’, ‘support worker’ and ‘befriender’ can be confusing if they’re not explained. People are more likely to come forward as volunteers if they can see themselves in the role. What’s in it for me?: Sell the role by describing how a new volunteer will benefit. This might include meeting people, having fun, receiving training, gaining work experience. Dispel fears: You’ve got their interest this far but they still may have some doubts. All sorts of things could be going around in their heads: “But I don’t know anything about computers”, “It could clash with my other commitments”. You can reassure people by explaining, for example, that you don’t need previous experience, that costs of food and travel are covered, that you welcome people from all sections of the community and that hours can be flexible. Acknowledgement to Volunteering, Number 80, August 2002 Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation
  34. 34. Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation 34 Writing a Media Release A media release is still one of the most effective ways of informing the media when you want to make an announcement or tell them about something you would like them to report. Once you have decided to communicate your news by writing and distributing a media release, make sure your news item is relevant to the newspaper, magazine, radio or television station you want to cover it. There are no set rules for preparing a media release, but there are some guidelines that will help you and the journalists. When writing the media release: • Make sure you include the most newsworthy information in the first paragraph, the “lead” paragraph. Yours could be just one of hundreds of media releases vying for attention in a busy news room. You have to grab the attention at the start or they may not read on. • Expand on the story in the following sentences, putting the least important information last. • Make sure you cover the essential points. Check that you cover the who, what, where, when, why and how of the matter you want reported. • Make sure your facts are right - and that you spell people’s names correctly as well as providing their title and position. • Use short sentences and short paragraphs. Use simple English and avoid jargon. • Attribute all statements to someone who has the authority to speak on the matter and include quotes from people involved. • Include a contact name and telephone numbers, including an after-hours number. Remember that joumalists do not work a standard working day and may need to speak to someone at the weekend or in the evening. • Make sure the contact person can be contacted and is informed – it is no good giving a contact number for someone who does not answer their phone or does not have the authority or the knowledge to speak about the information in the media release. • Do not stress over trying to put a clever heading on a media release. Simply summarise the release in a few words such as “Volunteer wins national award”. The magazine or newspaper sub editors will put their own headline on any story that is published. • Put the date on the media release. • If the media release is longer than one page, identify this at the bottom of the first page and the top of the second page. Acknowledgement to BLOW YOUR OWN TRUMPET! A publication of Volunteering Western Australia and Mills Wilson, 2002.
  35. 35. 35 Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation The importance of defining areas of responsibility for volunteer positions Recruitment Strategy Central to the successful recruiting strategy of any agency is the development of responsibility areas that will attract the right people into the organisation – and help keep them there. A carefully constructed position description ensures that the aims and objectives of the program are being met. It also protects the rights of the volunteer. Unlike paid workers, volunteers do not work under an award system, neither do they enter into an agreement based upon the provision of labour for a prescribed payment which is protected by law. They often do enter into a contract with an agency where they agree to perform certain tasks which are of benefit to the agency. Unless these tasks are formally written into a clear and concise statement of responsibilities, the agreement between agency and volunteer is open to misinterpretation. Benefits to Agency and Volunteers Bring a group of managers/coordinators of volunteers together in a workshop and within minutes they can develop a list of a dozen or so reasons why position descriptions are essential to successful volunteer involvement. The volunteer brief will: • set minimum sandards for the program • serve as a reference point for the volunteer who may be subject to the demands of a busy agency • put the volunteer in a position to make informed choices and have redress if something goes wrong • protect the rights of the client/consumer group • allow consumer/client input into the program • protect the agency from criticism of exploitation or discrimination • be a useful tool to bring into the agency skills to ensure that the agency can meet its objectives The statement of areas of responsibility should include the following basic elements: • a description of the placement objectives • skills and qualifications, essential and desirable • key areas of responsibilities and duties It should also clarify organisational relationships, answering questions such as: • who is the volunteer supervised by/ accountable to? • does the volunteer supervise other volunteers? • does the volunteer liaise with others in the organisation? The brief should also spell our the conditions of the position: • days and times required • training requirements
  36. 36. 36 Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation In summary The statement of responsibilities should be a concise document which is compatible with the overall aim of the program. It should be written to comply with relevant Equal Opportunity and Discrimination Acts and serve as a focus for the protection of the agency and the volunteer. Acknowledgement to Volunteer Centre of Victoria Volunteer Information Kit
  37. 37. 37 Information Kits for Potential Volunteers When potential volunteers approach your agency, it is important to acknowledge all inquiries and outline the process for which volunteers are recruited. This may involve having a brief discussion with the potential volunteer on the phone, taking some of their details, and following up the phone call by sending the interested person an information kit about your agency. Your “information kit” should contain relevant material about your agency and the services you provide, and enable the interested person to assess whether they would like to be a part of your volunteer team. An Information Kit may contain the following material: • An introductory letter, giving the name and contact details of the contact person for volunteers • Information about your organisation (mission, purpose) – this may be in the form of a flier/leaflet/newsletter • The types of volunteer positions that are available and a summary of what each position entails • The potential benefits of volunteering with your agency – the What’s In It For Me? details • Instructions on the application process – you may have a summary about how to apply for a volunteer position, when and where to apply • An application form • Details about the interview/screening process – does the applicant need a Police Clearance, references and so on • A copy of the rights and responsibilities of volunteers and agencies recruiting volunteers Remember, your Information Kit is a very useful promotional tool for your agency. Try to make it as informative as possible, but take into consideration that the information you provide should be easy to read and understand. You do not want to put a prospective volunteer off by making it too cumbersome/difficult for them before they commence volunteering. Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation
  38. 38. 38 Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation Acknowledgement to Volunteer Management: A Resource Manual, Volunteering SA, 1993, 1998 Interviewing Volunteers – Getting it Right Interviewing potential volunteers for a position is an important part of your screening process. It gives the coordinator and the volunteer an opportunity to discuss the agency, the position, what will be expected of the volunteer, and what the volunteer expects to get out of their volunteering (ie their motivations). The process may vary depending on the number of positions and number of applicants and your own time frame. However, there are some essential elements to conducting an effective interview. Use the process outlined below to guide interviews. Prepare some guidelines for interviewing and do not hesitate to ask for references, work history or evidence of qualifications. As a manager of volunteers you are acting in the best interests of the organisation, consumers/clients and existing staff. Preparing for the Interview Arrange an interview time that is convenient for you, as well as the potential volunteer. Try to make sure that you will not be interrupted during the interview, so that you can focus all of your attention on the person. Have an outline of the information that you need to discuss with the potential volunteer, as well as any documentation/forms that need to be completed during the interview. You may like to have a list of questions that you would like to discuss. For many people, attending interviews can be very stressful. Try to make the person feel as comfortable as possible, and take into consideration that they may be nervous, and that it has taken a lot of courage to take this first step into volunteering. Try to be aware that the interview is going to leave individuals with lasting impressions of your agency, so it is important to provide them with a positive experience. The process 1. Welcome the volunteer. Introduce yourself and explain your role. Begin to establish rapport. 2. Discuss information such as the volunteers interests and skills, experience and time availability. 3. Discuss the volunteers needs and aspirations ie their motivations for volunteering (please note: a volunteers motivations can change over time so it pays to periodically discuss these) 4. Provide details about your agency and what the position entails. You may like to provide information about training opportunities and other benefits of the position. 5. Make a mutual decision regarding the outcome of your discussion. 6. Make further arrangements as appropriate. (ie orientation and start date) 7. Summarise the interview and reinforce the decision that has been made (NB: not every person you interview will be appropriate to the position, and therefore it is a good idea to be prepared with information to help the volunteer to access other opportunities). You may wish to provide them with information about Volunteering WA, or suggest another agency that would suit them better. 8. Farewell, show appreciation for the individuals interest. 9. Complete any relevant documentation.
  39. 39. 39 Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation Interviewing When interviewing applicants for a volunteer position, the Equal Opportunity Laws (as in a paid position) should be taken into consideration. Questions should be non discriminatory, and relevant to the position. A rule to remember is: if you would not feel comfortable answering the question, you should not be asking a potential volunteer to answer such a question during the interview. Such questions would be in relation to: sexuality, religious preferences, social pursuits (ie drug taking), and personal information not related to the volunteer position or the agency. In some instances, the above mentioned may be important to the volunteer position. For example, if you are an agency that works with gay and lesbian individuals, a requirement may be that the volunteer is also gay or lesbian. Another example may be that a minimum age is required to carry out the volunteer tasks. For example, a volunteer driving position would require the person to be at least 17 years old. Your agency may have a policy which ensures that volunteers from all sections of the community are encouraged to be involved. Discuss and agree within your agency that you want to encourage all volunteers, regardless of their race, gender, disability, sexuality, or marital status, and then decide the ways in which you will make sure that this happens. Interviewing: how to say no • Paralleling the paid workforce, structures need to be in place before you interview a volunteer for any position within your organisation. • The interviewer spearheads the recruitment process and needs to thoroughly understand the philosophy, aims and objectives of the organisation and adhere to policy in the selection and placement of volunteers. • The interviewer must think through the skills and attributes needed for the volunteer to become a successful team member within the organisation. • Be quite clear why you may not accept the services of one person and recruit another for a particular placement. This is best done with a particular role in mind for the volunteer. A highly skilled volunteer is a short-term prospect if there is no real assignment. • Volunteers whose skills do not match the needs of your organisation should be redirected. They should be informed of the reasons in the best possible way to help them find an appropriate alternative. Volunteer Referral Services are useful in this process. • During the interview, the volunteer needs to be informed of the selection process. In this way, refusal of the volunteer can be achieved within a framework of dignity and honesty, and an agreed alternative found. • Build a review process or probationary period for new volunteers. This will act as a safeguard if the volunteer has not been placed appropriately.
  40. 40. 40 Pre-employment/Pre-placement Checks The Volunteer Centre of Western Australia promotes the principle that all organisations have a duty of care to the constituents they serve and to their volunteers. Any volunteer in a position of direct client or patient contact, should be subject to rigorous assessment of suitability including pre-employment/pre placement checks. Volunteer Referral does not encompass the screening process required by individual agencies, except as stated by the agency in the description of the Volunteer Position listed on file. It is the responsibility of agencies to screen volunteers according to individual stated policies. Policies may include the following checks as required by some agencies, funding bodies, insurance policies, or other governance factors: Proof of Identity Sighting of original documentary evidence of identity such as birth certificate, current passport or drivers licence. At least two documents should be sighted and cross checked. Qualifications Original documents must be sighted. Overseas documentation can be verified through the National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (NOOSR), GPO Box 1407, Canberra City, ACT 2601, Telephone: 1800 020 086. Referee Checks Thorough referee checks must be carried out for any person who is to be employed, paid or unpaid. A minimum of two referees are to be contacted personally. Work History It is important to check that a person’s job application discloses a complete work history. This is to ensure that the applicant has not been dismissed from a position because of any misconduct (this is to be checked with referees) if there are unexplained gaps in the work history. If there is some concern that the applicant has not disclosed a prior job, then this must be investigated and discussed with the applicant. Police Checks Police checks are conducted by the Police Department of Western Australia on payment of a fee. They consist of information recorded against an individual, including all criminal offences and any outstanding warrants. Prior to any offer of employment or placement being made, in a direct client/patient contact position, a police check should be completed for the applicant. The applicant must consent to the police check being completed by signing the “Consent to Criminal Records Check” form and be made aware that the check will only be conducted if he/she is to be offered a position. The cost of such a check should be born by the agency requiring it and therefore must be provided for in budget estimates. Acknowledgement to Volunteer Centre of Victoria Information Kit. Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation
  41. 41. 41 National Police Checks Not-for-profit agencies will often put strategies in place that help then to manage the risk that is involved with working with vulnerable people or in positions of financial risk. One risk management strategy is criminal record checks and there are two ways of doing this National Police Check The "National Police Checks for Volunteers" is a pilot program that commenced on 1 July 2003. Registered agencies will request the volunteer to complete part of the "Application for National Volunteer Police Check" form and provide proof of identity. The agency will then complete the form and email it to the WA Police Service. The Service will provide a response to the volunteer agency confirming whether the volunteer has a ‘Record" or "No Record". This pilot program will not reveal any other information regarding the record. Volunteer agencies will need to decide what action is to be taken if a "Record" is received in accordance with their own risk management practices. The WA Police Service will bill the volunteer group at $10 per check. To participate in this scheme the volunteer agency must be a not-for-profit organisation, a WA parent body, not a sub-branch and must not be a government body (Federal, State, or Local). If the group does not fit these criteria or is not registered, it will not be able to request a National Police Check and an alternative risk management procedure is for the volunteer to request a National Police Certificate. More details are available from www.volunteering.communitydevelopment.wa.gov.au. National Police Certificate This is issued upon application by an individual paying a $41 fee. A National Police Certificate lists an individual’s disclosable offence, recorded in any Australian police jurisdiction. If you require this certificate, you must apply in person at your local police station and provide suitable identification, as detailed on the application form. Telephone inquiries concerning the criminal history of either yourself or another person will not be accepted. The WA Police Service does not process applications for a National Police Certificate from persons who reside overseas or interstate. In these circumstances, applicants from overseas must apply to the Australian Federal Police (AFP). Further information and application form can be obtained on the AFP website, whilst interstate applicants must apply to their respective police jurisdiction. State Traffic Certificate A Traffic Certificate will list your disclosable traffic history, recorded by the WA Police Service. There is currently no provision for the issuance of a National Traffic Certificate. If you require the State Traffic Certificate, you must apply in person at your local police station and provide suitable identification. Application for a Traffic Certificate form attract a fee of $13.75. Further enquiries may be directed to: The Information Release Manager 5th Floor, 565 Hay Street, Perth WA 6000 Tel; 9268 7754 Fax: 9268 7664 Email: cio@police.wa.gov.au Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation
  42. 42. 42 Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation Spent Convictions Under the provisions of section 7(1) of the Spent Convictions Act 1988 only "lesser convictions" can be spent be the WA Police Service, after a time period of 10 years plus any term of imprisonment that may have been imposed (see application form for further restrictions). A lesser conviction is one for which imprisonment of 12 months or less, or a fine of less than $15,000 was imposed. All other convictions, such as "serious convictions" applicable under Section 6 of the Spent Conviction Act 1988 can only be spent by applying to the District Court. Applications to have "lesser convictions" spent must provide suitable identification and have details confirmed by a suitable witness (see application form for further details). All applications must be on the official form and can be lodged at any WA Police Station or mailed to the address shown below. No application fee is applicable Application for Certificate That Lessor Conviction is Spent Form Applicants applying to have lessor convictions" spent should not apply for a National Police Certificate until confirmation has been received that their convictions have been spent. Further enquiries may be directed to: The Officer In Charge Offender Information Bureau 2 Adelaide Terrace, Perth WA 6000 Tel: 9222 1231 Fax: 9222 1637 Email: OIB.Criminal.Records@police.wa.gov.au *Current as of 12 February 2003 Acknowledgement to WA Police Department website www.police.wa.gov.au
  43. 43. 43 Orientation Providing new volunteers with an orientation to your agency will welcome volunteers and help them to feel part of the team, as well as giving the coordinator the opportunity to provide a general picture of the agency, the program, the position and the staff. The orientation process and format will vary from agency to agency. Some agencies may provide individual orientations, whilst others may conduct orientations in a group. The time taken to provide the orientation will also differ. Although the format, length of time taken, and the way the orientation is presented may vary, the information that is provided will be similar. Orientation may cover information about the following areas: The organisation: History Mission and aims – purpose of individual programs Organisational structure Policies and procedures The volunteer: Information channels – what they are and how they work Expectations of agency and volunteer Details about support, supervision and training Insurance information Reimbursement Personal work space and equipment The position requirements Internal procedures such as parking and transport, lunch facilities, toilets, phones and office equipment Tour of premises/ building Introductions: Executive Director Paid staff Volunteer staff Occupational, health and safety issues: Emergency exit location and muster area First aid location Introduce to Fire Warden and OH&S representatives Fire protection Policies and Procedures: Codes of Practice Grievance Procedure Emergency Procedure Agreements: Agreements to be signed Standard Three V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia Recruitment Selection and Orientation
  44. 44. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 44 Samples SAMPLE Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation Acknowledgement to Carer’s Association of WA. Recruitment Carers’ Association of Western Australia Inc: Policy and Procedure Manual Section 13: Volunteers All volunteer positions will be advertised with Volunteering WA and other appropriate avenues such as the ‘Carers in WA’ newsletter, Carers WA website, newspapers, radio etc Resource Centre Volunteer Program Individuals applying for Office and Administration Volunteer work will be required to attend an interview with the Information and Education Manager. Prior to the interview, the volunteer will complete a Volunteer Application Form outlining their skills, interests and work preferences. During the interview the Information and Education Manager will discuss the volunteer’s application and complete a Volunteer Interview Form summarising the volunteer’s responses. “Linking Together”Volunteer Program All individuals applying for a place supporting carers will be required to: 1. Complete a “Linking Together” Volunteer Application Form prior to acceptance for an interview. This asks the potential volunteers to outline their skills, abilities and knowledge as related to the support of carers. Alternatively, potential volunteers may have been assessed and referred via Volunteering WA. 2. Attend an interview with the Volunteer Support Program Coordinator upon successful shortlisting for the program. The coordinator will ask the applicant a range of relevant questions, discuss the applicants’ application and the position requirements, and complete a Volunteer Interview Form summarising the applicants’ responses. Relevant attachments: Resource Centre Volunteer Application Form 13.3(a)GenVolAppForm “Linking Together” Volunteer Application form 13.3(b)LTVolAppForm “Linking Together” Interview Form 13.3(c)LTIVForm
  45. 45. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 45 Samples Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation Job Description for a Volunteer Program Manager Position title: Volunteer Program Manager Responsible to: Executive Director Broad purpose of the position: To promote, develop and maintain a high quality volunteer program, with volunteers and paid staff working in collaboration to achieve organisational goals. Qualifications: Tertiary qualifications and experience in human resource management is essential. Diploma of Volunteer Management and experience in working with volunteers desirable. Special conditions: Some out-of-hours work may be required. Duties: 1 Responsible for the day-to-day direction, development and management of all services provided by volunteers. 2 Promote the program and ensure that volunteers are carefully selected, orientated, trained, supervised and supported to ensure the provision of high quality services. 3 Develop policies, communication structures, information systems and management procedures to ensure volunteers work productively and harmoniously with paid workers, keeping in mind the interests of all stakeholders involved. 4 Liase with sectional managers to encourage appropriate volunteer involvement and support within their areas of responsibility. 5 Arrange for regular appraisal of individual volunteer performance and the program as a whole. 6 Develop rosters, and maintain records of services provided and hours contributed by volunteers. 7 Ensure that volunteer policy and practice guidelines are regularly reviewed. 8 Provide regular reports to the Executive Director on the volunteer program, including recommendations for future developments or improvements. 9 Prepare a budget for the program, and ensure expenditure is kept within the approved costing. 10 Ensure workplace arrangements are put in place relating to: occupational health and safety, legislation requirements such as equal opportunity, adequate insurance cover, reimbursement of out-of-pocket expenses 11 As a member of the Board of Management, assist in the process of policy development and decision making, and implement procedures in line with decisions made. 12 Keep abreast of wider issues relating to volunteering through attendance at network meetings of volunteer program managers and at conferences or training courses/sessions. 13 Liase with the media in promoting the program, and when called upon, address public forums regarding the contribution of volunteers, as necessary. 14 Perform other duties in line with overall responsibilities as necessary. SAMPLE Acknowledgement to Volunteer Management, an essential guide. Joy Noble and Louise Rogers. 1998
  46. 46. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 46 Samples SAMPLE Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation Policy on Police Certificates The agency will inform all prospective applicants for paid or volunteer positions that they will be required to provide a satisfactory National Police Certificate. The expense for the police certificate will be reimbursed by the agency only if the recommended candidate is subsequently appointed as an employee or volunteer. If the successful applicant has resided overseas the applicant will be required to supply a similar police certificate from the relevant jurisdiction. These costs will also be reimbursed if the recommended applicant is subsequently appointed. If the recommended applicant has any recorded criminal convictions, the Executive Director will make a determination as to whether the specified conviction would be likely to place the clients of the agency at any risk or breach the agency’s duty of care obligations. This determination will be based on: • whether the conviction has been for an offence which directly relates to the duties • whether the position being sought would offer unsupervised opportunities for a similar offence to take place • whether the offence has occurred recently • whether there are single or multiple convictions • whether the conviction(s) reflect generally on the suitability of the person to become an employee or volunteer with the agency
  47. 47. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 47 Samples SAMPLE Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation Acknowledgement to Kwinana Home Support Service – CVS. Acknowledgement Letter Saturday, August 3, 2002 ref: CVS29-LE- PO Box 1854 Canning Vale Western Australia 6970 Dear Ann, Re: Community Visitor Volunteer Thank you for your interest in becoming a CVS volunteer. As requested I have enclosed: • A brochure regarding CVS volunteers • Application form • Position description • A brochure about Kwinana Home Support Service Could you please fill in application form and return in enclosed stamped addressed envelope. On receipt of your application I will contact you to arrange an interview. Thank you for your interest and I look forward to hearing from you. Yours faithfully, Ann G Community Visitors Scheme Coordinator Mobile: E-Mail:
  48. 48. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 48 Samples SAMPLE Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation For insurance purposes Volunteer Registration Form Anglican Homes values its volunteers and we thank you for your interest in our Volunteer Service. The information you provide in this form is required for insurance purposes for all Anglican Homes volunteers. Please complete the form and return it to the Coordinator of Volunteers. The information you have given about yourself will assist the Coordinator of Volunteers to utilise your skills and experience and place you in a volunteer position that will match your experience and abilities. Privacy Statement in accordance with the Privacy Act – Information collected is for the purpose of providing a volunteer service to Anglican Homes only. No personal information is used or disclosed to other parties. All information is securely stored. Statistical non-personal information may be utilised from time to time. 1. Personal details Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms/Reverend/Sister/Dr: (Please Circle) First Name(s) ______________________ (Preferred Name): __________________________ Surname: __________________________ Address: __________________________________________________ Postcode: __________ Tel (bus)________________________________ Tel (a/h): ______________________________ Mobile: ________________________________ Fax: __________________________________ Place of Birth: __________________________ Date of Birth: __________________________ Are you a permanent resident of Australia? ______ If not, when does your visa expire? ______ Next of Kin or Person to contact in an emergency Name: ____________________________________ Relationship: ________________________ Emergency contact phone number: (home): ____________________ (bus): ______________ How did you find out about Anglican Homes Volunteer Service? ____________________________ Education Background: ____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Current/Previous Occupation:________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Hobbies and Interests: ____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Are you at present under any Mutual Obligation scheme(s) with Centre Link? ________________
  49. 49. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 49 Samples Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation SAMPLE Volunteer Registration Form cont’d 2. Location Anglican Homes is able to offer a wide choice of volunteer positions in different locations throughout Western Australia. Included with this registration form is a copy of the map indicating the locations of Anglican Homes facilities. Please advise us in which area(s) you would prefer to become a volunteer. Preferred Locations________________________________________________________________ 3. Availability Which days/times are you available for volunteering? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Morning Afternoon Evening 4. Type of volunteer activity preferred What type of volunteer tasks would you prefer to undertake? 1st Choice: ______________________________________________________________________ 2nd Choice:______________________________________________________________________ 3rd Choice: ______________________________________________________________________ 5. Health information Do you have any physical limitations or are you under any course of treatment, which might limit your ability to perform certain types of activities? Yes No If yes, please describe ____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ 6. Volunteer drivers (to be completed by volunteer drivers only) Yes No (1) Drivers Licence Number ________________________________________________________ (2) Class of Licence ______________________________________________________________ (3) State or Country of Issue ________________________________________________________ (4) Date of Expiry ________________________________________________________________
  50. 50. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 50 Samples Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation SAMPLE day day day day Acknowledgement to Anglican Homes (Incorporated) Volunteer Registration Form cont’d 7. Referees Please provide the names of two people who would be willing to speak on your behalf. The referees may be a friend, a parish priest, a current or former employer, work colleague or a neighbour etc. We request that the referees are not relatives. Contactable daytime telephone numbers of your referees would be appreciated. Referee 1. Referee 2. Name: __________________________________ Name: ________________________________ Relationship: ____________________________ Relationship: __________________________ Telephone No.: ____________________________ Telephone No.: __________________________ Mobile No: ______________________________ Mobile No: ____________________________ PLEASE NOTE: During registration procedures you will be asked to complete a Federal Police Clearance Form. The cost will be met by Anglican Homes. You will also be requested to provide some form of identification, which will be photocopied. e.g., Drivers Licence or Passport. Should we be advised by the Federal Police Department that disclosable court outcomes are revealed your placement, as a volunteer for Anglican Homes will be reviewed. All Anglican Homes volunteers are subject to a trial period. The duration of the trial period will be discussed during the interview. On completion of the trial period, the compatibility of the volunteer with the volunteer position will be reviewed. 8. Declaration I confirm that I have read, accept and agree to abide by Anglican Homes Mission, Values, Philosophy of Care and Code of Conduct for Staff and Volunteers detailed overleaf. I confirm that the information provided in this Registration Form is correct to the best of my knowledge. (Printed Full Name – CAPITALS) (Signature) (Date)
  51. 51. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 51 Samples Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation SAMPLE Acceptance Letter Dear (Volunteer name), Kwinana Home Support wishes to offer you the position of a volunteer. You will be placed on a three month probationary period. You must provide a police certificate and a medical certificate within the first two weeks of volunteering with Kwinana Home Support. This is to be done at your own cost. After a three month probation you will be reimbursed for your police clearance costs. You will then be issued a permanent badge and a tee-shirt. Confirmation of your appointment will be subject to the successful completion of the three months probation period. Please sign the letter and the copy of your duty statement and return them to the Volunteer Coordinator as confirmation of your acceptance of this offer. We look forward to working with you at Kwinana Home Support Service. Chairman Volunteer Coordinator Volunteer Date: Date: Date: Acknowledgement to Kwinana Home Support Service.
  52. 52. V O L U N T E E R R E S O U R C E M A N U A L 2003 © Volunteering Western Australia 52 Samples Standard Three Recruitment Selection and Orientation SAMPLE Acknowledgement to Carer’s Association of WA Orientation Policy Carers’ Association of Western Australia Inc: Policy and Procedure Manual Section13: Volunteers All volunteers will undergo an orientation session upon commencement with any of Carers’ Association of WA’s Volunteer Programs. Resource Centre Volunteer Program At the pre-arranged orientation session, the volunteer will be provided with an Orientation Package. This will contain: • Carers’ Association of WA Volunteer Agreement • Volunteer Personnel Record • Job Description • Copy of Section 13: Volunteers of the Policy and Procedures Manual and other relevant sections including Code of Behaviour, Grievance Procedure and Occupational Health and Safety The volunteer will be given time to read through the Orientation Package and discuss any areas of clarification with the Information and Training Manager. The volunteer and Information and Training Manager will then complete the Volunteer Agreement and Personnel Record Forms which will be filed with the confidential staff and volunteer personnel files. The Information and Training Manager will then complete an information session including: • Working through the volunteers section of the Policy and Procedures Manual • Expected times and hours of volunteer work • Answering any queries regarding the nature of the work “Linking Together”Volunteer Program Volunteers in the “Linking Together” Program will undertake their orientation and information session during the course of their training. This will include: • Carers’ Association WA organisational structure, philosophy and funding • Staff roles • Insurance • Issues relating to carer and support worker Relevant Attachments Organisation/Volunteer Agreement Volunteer Personnel Record Orientation Checklist Volunteer Log Sheet

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