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Ungs 2040 updated course outline 2015

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Ungs 2040 updated course outline 2015

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Ungs 2040 updated course outline 2015

  1. 1. INTERNATIONAL ISLAMIC UNIVERSITY MALAYSIA COURSE OUTLINE Kulliyyah Kulliyah of Islamic Revealed Knowledge and Human Sciences Department Department of General Studies Programme All programs except BIRK & BHsc Course Title Islam: Knowledge and Civilization Course Code UNGS 2040 Status University requirement Level Undergraduate Credit Hours 3 Contact Hours 3 Pre-requisites UNGS 2030 Co-requisites None Instructional Strategies Lecturer centered learning Student centered learning Content-based teaching Classroom discussion Instructional Strategies Face to Face Individual Preparation and Learning Assessment Total Lecture/ Classroom Instruction Practical SCL Preparatory reading,SCL andrevision Assignment, term-paper, task Preparation Mid-term, quizzes,final 39.5 53 10 19 4.5 126
  2. 2. Instructor (s) To be determined Semester Offered Every semester Course Synopsis This course deals with the basic issues that lead to a good understanding of theory of knowledge and civilization from Islamic and non-Islamic perspectives. It describes the contribution of Muslim scholars and scientists in different fields of knowledge and science throughout the history of Islamic civilization. The course also discusses some contemporary challenges facing the Muslim Ummah and the responses. Course Objectives This course aims at: 1. Acquainting students with meanings, objectives and importance of knowledge and civilization from Islamic perspective. 2. Describing and elucidating the various sources of knowledge and methodologies of scientific inquiry from both Islamic and non-Islamic perspectives. 3. Examining the laws and patterns of rise and fall of civilizations. 4. Recognizing and acknowledging Muslim contributions to various fields of knowledge and science. 5. Creating awareness of the challenges confronting Muslims and exploring the possible ways to revive Islamic civilization. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course, the student will be able to: 1. Show the impact of Islamic civilization on other civilizations. (C3) 2. Respond to the contemporary challenges facing Muslims in the fields of science and technology. (P3, LL2) 3. Explain the possible ways to revive Muslim civilization. (A3, CTPS3) Content Outlines Weeks Topics Task/Reading Islam and Knowledge 1 - Meaning -Importance -Objective - Qadir (1991), 5-14. 2 - Classification of knowledge - Bakar (2006), 121- 151, 203-226, 249- 262, 263-270. Knowledge: Sources & Means
  3. 3. 3 -Al-WaÍy (Revelation): The Qur’an & the Sunnah - Al-Attas (1989), 45- 66. - Mohammed & Hussain (2003), 67- 82. - Ilyas (2002), 49-68. - Nyazee (2000), 162- 181. 4 -Al-‘Aql (Reason and Intellect) - Al-Attas (1989), 45- 66. - Bakar (2006), Chap. 3. - Davutoglo (1994), 70– 72. 5 Nature & Al-×awās (Senses) - Al-Attas (1989), 45- 66. - Bakar (2006), Chap. 3. - Rahman (1994), 65- 79. Methodology in Sciences 6 - Definition & Classification - Safi (1996), 3-24. - Al-Attas (1992), 1-36. - Yousif (2004), 97- 114. 7 -Integrated Methodology: Islamisation & Integration of Knowledge - Safi (1996), 3-24. - al-Attas (1992), 1-36. - Yousif (2004), 97- 114. - Bakar (2006), 69-93. Islam and Civilization 8 - Meaning and Characteristics of Islamic Civilization - Impact of Islamic Civilization on Europe - Al-Faruqi (1986), 23- 48. - El-Mesawi (1998), 107-138. - Ibn Khaldun (1986), 87-184. - Bennabi (1991), 7-41. - As-Sibaa‘ie (2003), 63-85. -Thawaqib (2012),134-141. -Essa & Ali (2012), 21-23.
  4. 4. 9 - Patterns of rise and fall of civilizations - Factors behind the rise and decline of Islamic civilization and how to overcome them - Al-Faruqi (1986), 23- 48. - El-Mesawi (1998), 107-138. - Ibn Khaldun (1986), 87-184. - Bennabi (1991), 7-41. - Arslan (2004), 1-8 & 22-50. - The Contribution of Muslim Scholars 10 Natural/Physical Sciences - Nasr (1997), 126-285 & 325-327. - Sardar (1996), 144- 177. 11 Humanities & Social Sciences - Nasr (1997), 126-285 & 325-327. - Sardar, (1996), 144- 177. 12 Revealed & Religious Sciences - Al-‘Azami (2003), 165-193. Reviving Islamic Civilization: Challenges & Responses 13 - Challenges: -The intellectual challenge -The challenge of Islamophobia -The challenge of Western -hegemony -The challenge of modernism. - Sardar (1985), 66-75. - Nasr (1994), 180-191. - As-Sibaa‘ie (2003), 195-248. 14 - Responses - Sardar (1985), 66-75. - Nasr (1994), 180-191. - As-Sibaa‘ie (2003), 195-248. References Required As-Sibaa‘ie, M. (2003). Civilization of faith: A journey through Islamic history. (N. al-Khattab, Trans.). Riyadh: International Islamic Publishing House. Bakar, O. (2006). Classification of knowledge in Islam: A study of Islamic philosophies of science. Kuala Lumpur: ISTAC, IIUM. Nasr, S. H. (1983). Science and civilization in Islam. Lahore: Suhail Academy. Recommended Acikgenc, A. (1996). Islamic science: Towards a definition. Kuala Lumpur: ISTAC.
  5. 5. Al-Attas, S. M. N. (1989). Aqā’id al-NasafÊ.Kuala Lumpur: University Malaya. Al-Attas, S. M. N. (1992). Islam and secularism. Kuala Lumpur: ISTAC. Al-‘Azami, M. M. (2003). The history of the Qur’anic text from revelation to compilation: A comparative study with the Old and New Testaments. UK: Islamic Academy. Al-Faruqi, I. R. (1986). The cultural atlas of Islam. New York: Macmillan. Arslan, A. S. (2004). Our decline: Its causes and remedies. Kuala Lumpur: Islamic Book Trust. Bakar, O. (1991). Tawhid and science: Religious orthodoxy and the battle for rationality. UK: Zed Books Ltd. Bennabi, M. (1991). Islam in history and society. Kuala Lumpur: Berita Publishing. Davutoglu, A. (1994). Civilizational transformation and the Muslim world. Kuala Lumpur: Mahir publications. El-Mesawi, M. T. (1998). A Muslim theory of human society. Batu Caves, Selangor: Thinker’s Library. Essa, Ahmed & Ali, Othman. (2012). Studies in Islamic Civilization: The Muslim Contribution to the Renaissance. Herndon: International Institute of Islamic Thought. JAKIM. (2004). The Concept of Islam Hadhari. Kuala Lumpur: Percetakan Nasional Malaysia Berhad. Ibn Khaldun, A. R. (1986). Al-Muqaddimah (Vol. 1).(F. Rosenthal, Trans.). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. IIIT. (1982). Islam: Source and purpose of knowledge. Herndon, Virginia: International Institute of Islamic Thought. Ilyas, M. (Ed.). (2002). The unity of science and religion. Kuala Lumpur: A.S. Noordeen. Kamal Hasan (2005). Islam Hadhari “civilizational Islam”: An approach to a new government policy. Journal of Islam in Asia, 2 (1), 99-110. Mohammed, R. & Hussain D. (Eds.). (2003). Islam: The way of revival. (vol. 1). Markfield: Revival. Nasr, S. H. (1994). A young Muslim’s guide to the modern world. Petaling Jaya, Selangor: Mekar Publishers. Nyanzee, I. A. K. (2000). Islamic jurisprudence. Virginia: International Institute of Islamic Thought. Qadir, C. A. (1991). Philosophy and science in Islamic world. USA: Routledge. Safi, L. (1996). The foundation of knowledge. Petaling Jaya, Selangor: IIUM. Sardar, Z. (1985). Islamic futures: Reclaiming a heritage. London: Mansell. Siddiqi, M. Z. (1993). Hadith literature. Cambridge: Islamic Text Society. Thawaqib, Jahanbakhsh. The Contribution of Islamic Civilization to the Scientific and Technical Advancement of the World. Tans. Mahboobeh Morshedian. Summer 2012, Vol. 13, No.2.
  6. 6. Toynbee, A. J. (1946). A study of history. New York: Oxford University Press. Yousif, A. F. (2004). Islam and science: A Southeast Asian perspective. Kuala Lumpur: Research Center. Proposed Start Date (Semester) Semester I, 2015/2016 Batch of Students to be Affected Semester I,2015/2016 Prepared by: __________________ Coordinator, Curriculum Committee Checked by: _______________ Head, Dept. of Fundamental & Interdisciplinary Studies Approved by: ______________ Dean, KIRKHS
  7. 7. NOTE: 1. The course outlines should reflect the course description/synopsis and Islamic mission of the university as well as to provide the room for Islamic critique. 2. Latest editions of textbooks and references should be used unless otherwise necessary or if the course is classical in nature. Please check with the library to ensure that the books are up-to-date and incorporating the latest edition. 3. The reference lists shall be presented in accordance with APA bibliographic practices and in alphabetical order. 4. The reference title shall be italicised or underlined or bold. If in doubt, please consult the Librarian. 5. Proposed course outlines should be presented to the Senate Standing Committee for approval at least four months prior to the course offering.
  8. 8. COURSE ASSESSMENT MATRIX ISLAM, KNOWLEDGE AND CIVILIZATION (UNGS 2040) ISLAM, KNOWLEDGE AND CIVILIZATION OBJECTIVES / OUTCOME INDICATORS/ COURSE 1.Explaintheconceptsofknowledge,scienceand civilization. 2.Criticallyelaborateonvariousmethodologiesof scientificinquiry. 3.ExplaintheimpactofIslamiccivilizationonother civilizationsincludingmodernWesterncivilization. 4.IdentifycontemporarychallengesfacingMuslims inthefieldsofscienceandtechnologyandthe expectedresponsestothem. 5.Suggestthepossiblewaysoffulfillingthe requirementsofrevivingMuslimcivilization. Final Examination 3 3 3 3 2 Mid Semester Examination 3 2 - - - Term-paper 3 2 3 3 2 Quizzes & review of relevant materials 3 2 3 3 2

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