Let’s eat -feeding healthy families

361 views

Published on

Nutrition presentation for preschool parents

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
361
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Over 50% of physicians recommend infant cereal as a first food
  • The first ingredient is rice flour
  • It’s almost as if there are two different food supplies, and not as simple as organic vs. conventionalThe bigger difference seems to be whole foods vs. highly processed refined foods—even if they are organic
  • Caregivers can moderate color, temperature, texture, and cultivate familiar flavors as baby is developmentally ready
  • Sweetened cereals 6-9 mo 14% 9-12 mo 19%12-15 mo 31%15-18 mo 45 %18-24 mo 35%
  • Sweetened cereals 6-9 mo 14% 9-12 mo 19%12-15 mo 31%15-18 mo 45 %18-24 mo 35%
  • The goal is to cultivate a palate that allows an adequate intake of --whole foods--good enough balance
  • Let’s eat -feeding healthy families

    1. 1. Bonnie Y. Modugno, MS, RD www.muchmorethanfood.com Let’s Eat Strategies for Feeding Healthy Families
    2. 2. Agenda 1. Food as a developmental tool 2. Food as nourishment 3. Feeding healthy families a. Strategies at home b. Strategies away from home 4. Special concerns a. Picky eaters b. Food allergies c. Specific dietary concerns
    3. 3. Food as a developmental tool • Breastfeeding vs. bottle feeding – – – – Taste preferences Muscular development Microbiome Self regulation
    4. 4. Food as a developmental tool • Introduction of solid foods – – – – – Taste preferences Muscular development Microbiome Self regulation Metabolic impact
    5. 5. Which complementary foods first? • Solid foods or supplemental foods were not routinely offered to babies less than one year of age before 1920.
    6. 6. Survey of Pediatricians • What do you recommend for baby’s first food? White Rice Whole Grain A vegetable A fruit Egg Yolk Meat Other % of respondents 0 10 20 30 40 Medscape Pediatrics Commentary: Starting Solid Foods: Are We Doing It Right? July 6, 2011/ 2012
    7. 7. Infant Cereal Nutrition Facts Serv. Size 1/4 cup (16g) Amount Per Serving Servings Per Container 14 Calories 60 Total Fat: 0.5g Trans Fat: 0g Sodium: 0mg Potassium: 15mg Total Carbohydrates: 13g Dietary Fiber: 0g Sugar: 1g Protein: 1g • Ingredients RICE FLOUR, TRI- AND DICALCIUM PHOSPHATE, SOYBEAN OIL, SOY LECITHIN, MIXED TOCOPHEROLS (TO PRESERVE FRESHNESS), ELECTROLYTIC IRON, ZINC SULFATE, ALPHA TOCOPHERYL ACETATE (VITAMIN E) NIACINAMIDE (A B VITAMIN), PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE (VITAMIN B6), RIBOFLAVIN (VITAMIN B2), THIAMIN MONONITRATE (VITAMIN B1), FOLIC ACID (A B VITAMIN), VITAMIN B12 (CYANOCOBALAMIN)
    8. 8. The spectrum of baby foods
    9. 9. Considering first foods Infant food GI GL Rice cereal (US) 95 6 Sweet potato (Australia) 66 17 Oat porridge (Sweden) 55 15 Taro (Pacific Islanders) 55 4 Hominy (Pima Indian) 40 12 Casava (Kenya) 46 12 Lentils (India) 29 5 Pinto beans (Mexico) 14 4 Fermented Maize (Ghana) 12 7 Hummus (Turkey) 6 0
    10. 10. Unconventional first foods Rethinking First Foods Avocado Pureed meat based gruels, soups Pureed chicken, beef, pork, lamb Mashed, pureed fish Eggs, egg yolk Yogurt, Greek yogurt Tofu Mashed, beans, lentils Mashed cooked vegetables
    11. 11. Smart Bites for Baby • Recipes with insight – Developmentally appropriate – Nutritionally on target
    12. 12. Food as a developmental tool • The growing child – – – – – Taste preferences Metabolic impact Microbiome Self regulation Metabolic impact • Regardless of body size
    13. 13. What Toddlers Eat 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 6-8.9 mo 9-11.9 mo 12-14.9 mo 15-17.9 mo 18-24 mo Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) ADAJ 2010
    14. 14. Consumption patterns of infants and toddlers consuming foods at least once a day 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) ADAJ 2010 6-8.9 mo 9-11.9 mo 12-14.9 mo 15-17.9 mo 18-24 mo
    15. 15. Feeding Children Choosing more whole foods FOOD GI GI Scone 92 Cooked peas 48 Pretzels 83 Chicken nuggets (Aust) 44 Waffle 76 Pasta (al dente) 43 Vanilla wafers 77 Banana (slightly under ripe) 42 French fries 75 Apple 40 Cheerios cereal 74 Pinto beans 39 Graham crackers 74 Fish fingers 38 Bagel 72 Yam 37 Oatmeal 69 Pear 33 Arrowroot biscuit 63 Yogurt – (Aust/sweetened) 27
    16. 16. Choosing meals: balance is key • Question the role of “kid’s food” • Question the premise of being able to eat “whatever you want” • Question the thinking behind “getting away with it”
    17. 17. Feeding Healthy Families • At home • Away from home
    18. 18. What to look for • • • • Choices Variety of mostly whole foods Balanced meal options Appropriate portions
    19. 19. Kid’s Meals SIT DOWN RESTAURANTS N=12 10 8 Only 4 out of 61 menu options included a fruit or vegetable (less than 7%) Pizza Burger/Fr Dog/ Fr 6 Mac'nCh 4 Pasta 2 Sand/Fr 0 Chx/Fr PRO/Veg Modugno, MS, RD. Survey 2005. Unpublished
    20. 20. Choices for parents… and their kids
    21. 21. Fast food and child obesity • Fact vs. fiction – Sloppy assumptions promoted in popular press, public health, & medical venues – Background diet more significant than fast food meals Poti, et al. The association of fast food consumption with poor dietary outcomes and obesity among children: is it the fast food or the remainder of the diet? AJCN Oct, 2013.
    22. 22. Challenging Conditions • Picky eater • Food allergies • Specific dietary concerns
    23. 23. Introducing New Foods • What is the average number of tries before success?
    24. 24. Introducing New Foods Average number of tries before success? • 14-16 times • Most care givers give up after three attempts
    25. 25. NEOPHOBIA Parents Siblings Anxiety Emotionality Genetic Traits •Exposure •Modeling Behavioral Factors Environmental Factors •In utero •Breastfeeding British Journal of Nutrition (2008), 99, Suppl. 1, S15–S21
    26. 26. Picky eater or something else? • • • • • • Texture Temperature Mouth feel Taste Smell Color
    27. 27. Pediatric Food Allergies in US Amy M. Branum and Susan L. Lukacs , Pedriatrics. Food Allergy Among Children in the United States. Nov 16, 2009 DOI: 10.1542/peds.2009-1210
    28. 28. Food Allergies • Possible Contributing Factors – Poor diet increases inflammation • Omega 6: omega 3 imbalance • Excess sugar, refined starch – Compromised gut microbiome – ??? Hygiene hypothesis, pesticides, genetic engineering, less diverse food supply
    29. 29. The case with gluten MSG Smoke flavors Glazes Textured vegetable protein Artificial flavors Ice cream, frozen yogurt Hydrolyzed vegetable protein Natural colors Instant teas, coffees Hydrogenated starch hydrozylate Artificial colors Mayonnaise Hydroxypropylated starch Caramel coloring & flavoring Mustard Pregelatinized starch Soy sauce Frying oil Vegetable gum Miso Seasoned poultry/meat Vegetable protein Boullion or stock cubes Sour cream Extenders and binders Cheese foods/spreads Dry & honey roasted nuts Maltodextrin Dextrin Maltose Baking powder Natural flavors Chocolate
    30. 30. Special Diets • • • • • Autism, ADHD Diabetes Seizures, epilepsy Overweight/obesity Disordered eating/eating disorders
    31. 31. Feeding Healthy Families Supporting better metabolic health for children  Support breastfeeding  Provide nutrition & other meaningful support for mom post partum  Prepare first foods from whole foods  Exercise caution re: commercial baby foods  Encourage balance for all meals and snacks, especially for those children w/ higher metabolic risk
    32. 32. Thank You! Q&A Bonnie Y. Modugno, MS, RD www.muchmorethanfood.com Let’s Eat Strategies for Feeding Healthy Families

    ×