1800 working hours for teachers per annum

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1800 working hours for teachers per annum

  1. 1. 20/02/2013   Zonkesizwe  –  Workshop  Session  - 1800 Working Hours per Annum - Presenter: Dr Muavia Gallie (PhD) Education Moving Up Cc. muavia@mweb.co.za http://muavia-gallie.blogspot.com http://supervisingwithadifference.blogspot.com www.slideshare.net www.movingup.co.za Programme   1  
  2. 2. 20/02/2013   Content    1.  Awareness  to  the  Blind  Spots  in  SA  educaCon  (4  –  18);  2.  Current  status  of  Learner  Performance,  and   contribuCng  issues  (19  –  25);  3.  LegislaCve  guidance  as  to  the  Numbers  in  EducaCon   (26  –  42);  4.  Unpacking  of  the  1800  hours  of  Accountability   requirements,  and  Why?  (43  –  52);  5.  Why  the  need  to  Change  –  Turnaround  strategy,  and   one  example  from  a  current  project  (53  –  85);  6.  Summarising  the  discussion  of  the  day,  and  defining  a   way  forward  (86  –  87);  7.  Conclusion  (88  -­‐  89).   Session  1  Awareness  to  the  Blind  spots  in  S.A.   educaCon   2  
  3. 3. 20/02/2013   Awareness  TIMSS Participation Countries 2007 6 3  
  4. 4. 20/02/2013   TIMSS 2003 - Applying Maths 7 SACMEQ Countries Botswana Kenya Lesotho Malawi MauritiusMozambique Namibia Seychelles South Africa Swaziland Tanzania Pupil Uganda reading Zambia sco re s Zanzibar ZimbabweSource: SACMEQ Data, 2007 8 4  
  5. 5. 20/02/2013   SACMEQ Results6 6 7 62 5 2 212 13 11 1215 15 13 144 3 1 17 12 4 1113 9 14 131 2 3 49 10 9 85 4 6 53 1 5 310 11 8 914 14 12 1511 7 10 108 8 15 7 9 10 5  
  6. 6. 20/02/2013   11 Two  different  Standards?  ANA  -­‐  17%   6  
  7. 7. 20/02/2013   13 Comparing Grades 1-12 from 1999 to 20121,350,0001,300,0001,250,000 19991,200,000 20001,150,000 20011,100,000 20021,050,000 20031,000,000 2004 950,000 2005 900,000 2006 850,000 800,000 2007 750,000 2008 700,000 2009 650,000 2010 600,000 2011 550,000 2012 500,000 Ave. 450,000 Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade 400,000 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 7  
  8. 8. 20/02/2013   Gap GapComparing Grades 1-12 from 1999 to 2012 Now %Learner Trace %Learner Gr1 &Year Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 12 Retained Years Years1999 1,318,932 1,223,529 1,194,425 1,167,683 1,087,829 998,705 937,741 1,043,067 917,239 840,803 738,220 571,848 747,084 43%  2000 1,055,397 1,090,765 1,178,712 1,167,949 1,088,836 1,009,782 936,454 1,039,547 922,566 836,962 724,192 549,203 506,194 52%  2001 1,150,637 944,961 1,087,675 1,175,860 1,098,863 1,023,269 932,151 1,068,479 916,280 846,655 709,508 488,352 662,285 42%  2002 1,286,591 1,012,892 949,721 1,076,107 1,142,806 1,038,679 958,932 936,392 1,089,404 876,175 719,952 486,786 799,805 38% 430,453 53%2003 1,277,499 1,111,858 1,003,331 952,465 1,035,707 1,101,740 987,876 976,750 902,129 1,096,214 736,720 475,069 802,430 37% 567,998 46%2004 1,303,016 1,109,201 1,081,956 985,139 916,911 997,365 1,050,554 1,010,710 914,729 1,057,935 829,137 505,392 797,624 39% 432,349 54%2005 1,233,581 1,118,690 1,078,001 1,061,770 951,372 898,493 972,542 1,052,499 930,797 1,069,494 839,009 538,909 694,672 44% 459,796 54%2006 1,185,198 1,081,652 1,099,319 1,072,780 1,026,031 919,487 872,051 1,020,734 970,946 1,093,297 890,564 568,664 616,534 48% 519,165 52%2007 1,171,323 1,050,103 1,066,796 1,090,762 1,035,449 1,001,687 896,138 930,019 957,450 1,115,961 920,102 625,809 545,514 53% 462,020 54%2008 1,122,114 1,031,821 1,017,656 1,050,860 1,043,012 1,001,852 964,345 926,603 902,656 1,076,527 902,752 595,216 526,898 53% 599,209 50%2009 1,106,827 1,004,311 1,004,585 1,019,886 1,009,370 1,012,619 970,902 991,093 926,531 1,017,341 881,661 602,278 504,549 54% 621,251 49%2010 1,116,899 994,410 972,668 1,002,645 978,983 978,016 980,747 1,001,180 1,009,327 1,039,762 841,815 579,384 537,515 52% 739,548 44%2011 1,177,089 1,003,353 957,209 974,860 957,203 946,427 941,291 1,008,110 1,049,904 1,049,189 847,738 534,498 642,591 45% 520,899 51%2012 1,208,973 1,074,788 967,373 966,349 939,025 935,446 912,528 971,509 1,096,113 1,103,495 874,331 551,837 657,136 46% 598,800 48%Ave. 1,194,001 1,064,516 1,061,237 1,068,659 1,034,597 998,475 955,036 999,756 946,671 997,261 811,136 548,909 Diff Trace 15 Success rate = 8,1% • Success-rate of the system = 8,1% • Of every 12 learners starting Grade One, only 1 learner attains what the system is promising them - data 2005! 16 8  
  9. 9. 20/02/2013   Access vs Success Short-Listing EmploymentQuantity Quality Whether you Pass! How you Pass! 17 Awareness  <-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐>  Knowledge   3. Caution 4. Certainty “I know what I “I know what IAwareness don’t know” know” Explore Exploit 1. Ignorance 2. Amnesia “I don’t know what “I don’t know I don’t know” what I know” Experiment Expose Knowledge 9  
  10. 10. 20/02/2013   Session  2   Current  status  of   learner   performance,  and   contribuCng  issues   2.1  Current  status  of  Learner   Performance  •  Ekurhuleni  South  District;  •  4th  Matric  class  (2009,  191-­‐70=36.6%;  2010,   140-­‐69=49.3%;  2011,  41-­‐35=85.4%);  •  Declined  from  85.4%  to  67%;  •  Number  of  learners  –  42  (2011),  107  (2012);  •  EGD  “is  doing  well”.   10  
  11. 11. 20/02/2013  Ekurhuleni  South  District   Zonkizizwe  Township   11  
  12. 12. 20/02/2013   Zonkizizwe  High  School   2.2  IdenCfied  Issues  •  Ajendance  of  periods  by  both  teachers  and   learners;  •  OpCmal  use  of  contact  Cme;  •  Unpacking  of  1800  hours  as  sCpulated  in  the   PAM  document.   12  
  13. 13. 20/02/2013   Japp 25 Session  3   LegislaCve  guidance  as  to  the   Numbers  in   EducaCon   13  
  14. 14. 20/02/2013   LegislaCve  Guidance   •  The  ConsCtuCon;   •  Labour  RelaCons  Act;   •  Basic  CondiCons  of  Employment  Act;   •  South  African  Council  for  Educators;   •  Employment  of  Educators  Act;   •  Personnel  AdministraCve  Measures;   •  Curriculum  Assessment  Policy.   Nature of Labour Relations•  Labour relations phases: - era of exploitation (1870 – 1924); - era of colonialism and paternalism (1925 - 1980); - era of adversarialism (1980 - 1995); - era of co-determination and cooperation (since 1995);•  Human rights - rights of individuals - protection of minorities•  Balance between employer and employee rights; 14  
  15. 15. 20/02/2013   Sources of Labour Relations•  Regulated through a variety of documents, agreements and forums; - workplace; - bargaining chambers (ELRC); - courts (labour court); - parliament.•  10 Different sources: (1) individual contracts, (2) legislation, (3) sectoral determinants, (4) collective agreements, (5) guidelines by labour courts, (6) international labour standards, (7) jurisprudence of foreign courts, (8) custom and practice, (9) constitutional provisions and (10) common law. Legislation •  South African Constitution (Act 108 of 1996), and the Bill of Rights (to regulate the power of the state and to determine basic principles for the development of legislation); •  Labour Relations Act (Act 66 of 1995); •  Employment of Educators Act (Act 76 of 1998); •  International Labour Organisation (ILO) - Convention no. 111, ratified by SA achievement of equality of opportunity and treatment in respect of employment and occupation and through the elimination of discrimination (Tinarelli, 2000, 7). 15  
  16. 16. 20/02/2013   Constitution•  Bill of Rights - Section 23 - Labour relations - right to fair labour practices - Rights of employer, worker, trade unions;•  Section 7 - founding values: human dignity, equality and freedom;•  Section 8 - application of Bill of Rights;•  Section 9 - affirmative action;•  Section 10 - human dignity;•  Section 12 - freedom and security of the person;•  Section 18 - freedom of association;•  Section 22 - freedom of trade, occupation and profession;•  Section 24 - environment;•  Section 33 - just administrative action;•  Section 36 - limitation clause Labour Relations Act•  Purpose of the Act - advance economic development, social justice, labour peace and democratisation of the workplace - give effect to and regulate the fundamental rights of section 27 of Constitution; - give effect to the obligations of ILO; - provide a framework within which employees, trade unions, employers and employers organisation can * collectively bargain - wages, conditions of service; * formulate industrial policy - promote: * orderly collective bargaining; * collective bargaining at sectoral level; * employee participation in decision making at workplace; * effective resolution of labour disputes. 16  
  17. 17. 20/02/2013   Basic  CondiCons  of  Employment  Act  •  Regula.on  of  working  .me  (p.8)  –  “Every  employer  must   regulate  the  working  Cme  of  each  employee”  •  Ordinary  hours  of  work  (p.8)  –  “Subject  to  this  Chapter,  an   employer  may  not  require  or  permit  an  employee  to  work   more  than  45  hours  in  any  week  …  or  eight  (8)  hours  in  any   day  if  the  employee  works  on  more  than  five  days  in  a   week”  •  Meal  intervals  (p.9)  –  “An  employer  must  give  an  employee   who  works  conCnuously  for  more  than  five  hours  a  meal   interval  of  a  least  one  conCnuous  hours  …  An  employee   must  be  remunerated  for  a  meal  interval  in  which  the   employee  is  required  to  work  or  is  required  to  be  available   for  work”  •  Schedule  One  (p.36)  –  “to  reduce  the  working  hours  of   employees  to  the  goal  of  a  40  hour  working  week  and  an   eight  hour  working  day”   Employment of Educators ActTo provide for the employment of educators by the State, for the regulation of the conditions of service, discipline, retirement and discharge of educators and for matters connected therewith.•  Chapter 1 - interpretation and application of Act;•  Chapter 2 - conditions of service and educator establishments;•  Chapter 3 - appointments, promotions and transfers;•  Chapter 4 - termination of services;•  Chapter 5 - incapacity and misconduct; Education Laws Amendment Act (Act 53 of 2000) - Schedule 1: Incapacity code and procedures for poor work performance; … in respect of ill health and injury - Schedule 2: Disciplinary code and procedures for educators;•  Chapter 6 - South African Council for Educators (repealed)•  Chapter 7 - General. 17  
  18. 18. 20/02/2013   Individual Employment Relations•  Defining an educator (Employment of Educators Act) – “any person who teachers, educates or trains …”•  Rights and duties of employers and employees (p.258)-  Right of educators to physical safety (Occupational Health and Safety Act);-  Right of educators to psychological safety (perception, well-being);-  Right of educators to protection against sexual harassment;•  Terms and conditions of educators’ employment contracts (individual teachers don’t sign an employment contract);-  Regulations (87 pages);-  Personnel Administration Measures (PAM) (over 100 pages) – A. Workload, duties and rank designations; B. Qualifications, advertising and filling of posts; C. Development appraisal; D. Allowances and per-hour remuneration of educators; E. Public examinations – duties, remunerations and compensation; F. Service benefit awards and retirement; G. Time off and secondment; H. Grievance procedure; I. Measures prescribed by general legislation; J. Leave measures.South African Council for Educators•  Chapter 1 - interpretation and objects of the Act;•  Chapter 2 - continuation, powers and duties, composition and governance of council;•  Chapter 3 - registration of educators;•  Chapter 4 - general•  Code of professional ethics: - noble calling of their profession - commit themselves to do all within their powers … 18  
  19. 19. 20/02/2013   Professionalism•  Specialised Knowledge (a strong body of specialised knowledge);•  Continued Research (propensity to evaluate current practice and identify and substitute redundant practice);•  Professional Authority of the Practitioner (trust placed by society as result of high quality of service rendered);•  Acknowledgement of Authority by Society (respect and esteem from the society);•  Developing and Maintaining a Professional Ethical Code (disciplined use of oneself in valid knowledge and insight into self-control pertaining to use of one’s emotions);•  Service Orientation (render a service where the interest of the client came first). 37 Other statutes•  Public Service Act (Proclamation no. 103 of 1994);•  Occupational Health and Safety Act (Act 85 of 1996);•  Basic Conditions of Employment Act (Act 75 of 1997);•  Employment Equity Act (Act 55 of 1998);•  Skills Development Act (Act 56 of 1998);•  Promotion of Administrative Justice (Act 3 of 2000)------------------•  South African Schools Act (Act 84 of 1996);•  National Education Policy Act (Act 27 of 1996) 19  
  20. 20. 20/02/2013   Common Law Several common law principles: •  Are still valid and referred to SA context; •  Have been developed i.t.o. Constitution, to suit modern tendencies and demands; •  Have been codified in statutes such as Promotion of Administrative Justice Act; •  Non-compliance with the audi alteram partem principle = employee not granted a fair hearing, then dismissal becomes procedurally unfair; Application of Common Law PrinciplesCommon law principle or maxim Brief meaning APPLICATION NORMALLY IN ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONAudi alteram partem Let the other side (of the story) also be heardNemo ludex in propria causa est No one is fit to judge (or witness) his own caseUltra vires To act outside the scope of one s powerIntra vires To act within the power or competence APPLICATION NORMALLY IN CASES OF THE LAW OF DELICTIn loco parentis In the place (instead) of a parentActio legis Aqquiliae Delictual action or Aquillian actionin cases of pecuniary lossesActio iniuriarium Delictual claiming of satisfaction after injuries to body, name, etc.Volenti non fit iniuria He who consents cannot receive an injuryBoni mores Good moral convictions that prevail in a specific communityContra bonos mores Against good morals that prevails in a specific communityPactum de non petendo in anticipando A contract not to claim damagesSolatum/solatia/solacium Reparation of personal harm for injury to feelings APPLICATION NORMALLY IN THE LAW OF CONTRACTPacta servanda sunt Agreements are to be observedCaveat subscriptor/emptor The person who signs a contract is bound by it and should be carefulCondicio sine qua non An essential condition/element 20  
  21. 21. 20/02/2013  Teacher rights and responsibilities 41 Other  Policies  •  Curriculum  Policies   – 27  hours  of  InstrucConal  Cme  per  week;   – Timetable  organised  around  5.5  hours  per   day;   – FREE  PERIODS;  •  School  Calendar   – 200  days   21  
  22. 22. 20/02/2013   Session  4   Unpacking  the  1800   working  hours  of   Accountability   requirements   Know your Numbers•  200 School days;•  170 Teaching and Learning days;•  34 Weeks of Teaching and Learning;•  935 Hours of Teaching and Learning;•  20 – 24 Hours of Examination time;•  Account for 1800 hours of work. 44 22  
  23. 23. 20/02/2013   45 4.1.6.1  Clarity  around  1800  hours  1400  hours   (200  x  7   hours)   400  hours   Contact   Time     (Teaching   and   +   Co-­‐Extra-­‐ mural   ac.vi.es   Learning)   23  
  24. 24. 20/02/2013   4.1.6.2  Clarity  around  1800  hours  1400  hours   (200  x  7   hours)   400  hours   Contact   Time     (Teaching   and   +   Co-­‐ Curriculum   Ac.vi.es   Learning)   4.1.6.3  Clarity  around  1800  hours   1400  hours   Contact   300   Time     hours   Plus  100  hours  (0.5  p/d)   of  Co-­‐Curriculum  Ac.vi.es  (into  the   +   Co-­‐ Curriculu m   Ac.vi.es   Timetable)   24  
  25. 25. 20/02/2013   4.1.6.4  Clarity  around  1800  hours   1400  hours   Contact   Time     + 200  hours   Plus   Co-­‐ 200  hours  (1  p/d)  of   Curriculum   Ac.vi.es   Co-­‐Curriculum   Ac.vi.es(into  the   Timetable)   4.1.6.4  Clarity  around  1800  hours   1400  hours   Contact   Time     + 100  hours   Plus   Co-­‐300  hours  (1.5  p/d)  of   Curriculum   Ac.vi.es   Co-­‐Curriculum   Ac.vi.es(into  the   Timetable)   25  
  26. 26. 20/02/2013   Spot  the  5  Differences!   Monday   Tuesday   Wednesday   Thursday   Friday   Periods   Day  Times   Day  Times   Day  Times   Day  Times   Day  Times   Extra-­‐Mural   Social   Assembly   Grade  8  -­‐  9   Grade  10-­‐12   Support   RegistraCon   07h45 - 08h00 07h45 - 08h00 07h45 - 08h00 07h45 - 08h00 07h45 - 08h00 1   08h05 - 08h45 08h05 - 08h45 08h05 - 08h45 08h05 - 08h45 08h05 - 08h45 1   2   08h50 - 09h30 08h50 - 09h30 08h50 - 09h30 08h50 - 09h30 08h50 - 09h30 2   3   09h35 - 10h15 09h35 - 10h15 09h35 - 10h15 09h35 - 10h15 09h35 - 10h15 3   4   10h20 - 11h00 10h20 - 11h00 10h20 - 11h00 10h20 - 11h00 10h20 - 11h00 4   Break  1   11h00 - 11h20 11h00 - 11h20 11h00 - 11h20 11h00 - 11h20 11h00 - 11h20 Break  1   5   11h20 - 12h00 11h20 - 12h00 11h20 - 12h00 11h20 - 12h00 11h20 - 12h00 5   6   12h05 - 12h45 12h05 - 12h45 12h05 - 12h45 12h05 - 12h45 12h05 - 12h45 6   7   12h50 - 13h30 12h50 - 13h30 12h50 - 13h30 12h50 - 13h30 12h50 - 13h30 7   Break  2   13h30 - 13h50 13h30 - 13h50 13h30 - 13h50 13h30 - 13h50 13h35 - 14h15 8   8   13h50 - 14h30 13h50 - 14h30 13h50 - 14h30 13h50 - 14h30 9   14h35 - 15h15 14h35 - 15h15 14h35 - 15h15 14h35 - 15h15 10   15h20 - 16h00 15h20 - 16h00 15h20 - 16h00 15h20 - 16h00 Annual  Planning   Monitoring & Implementing Evaluation          Description Plan Act/Do Reflect Plan Act/Do Reflect Frequency Length Total Time When Scheduled Code   Periods pw 30min ppWork Schedule             1 25 25   WS        Pre-Moderation             25 0,5 12,5   Pmod        Moderation             60 1,5 90   Mod        Assessment - Summative             17 0,5 8,5            Assessment - Formative             12 2 24            Playground duty             40 1 40            Devotion             8 0,5 4           Parents Meeting             3 3 9           SMT meeting             200 0,25 50            Staff meeting             8 2 16            General Staff Development             8 1 8           Team building             1 8 8           Exhibitions - LTSM             1 6 6           Bosberaad             1 16 16            AGM of parents             1 4 4           Sports day             1 8 8           Operational meeting             40 1 40            ANA meeting             1 1 1           RCL Leadership development             2 36 72            RCL Meetings             40 2 80            RCL Elections             1 1 1           Cluster meetings             4 2 8           Exhibitions - LearnerEnrichment             1 2 2           Exhibitions - Roadshows             2 2 4           Excursions             1 8 8           Marking - Summative             30 5 150            Marking - Formative             10 5 50            District Officials meeting             4 1,5 6      30 0,5  Staff Functions             4 2 8    759   510 1269 26  
  27. 27. 20/02/2013   Session  5  Why  the  need  to  Change?  Turnaround  strategy,  and   one  example  from  a   current  project   Turnaround  Framework  1.  We  are  in  trouble!;  2.  What  is  going  on?;  3.  What  should  have  happened?;  4.  Our  new  operaCon  behaviour,  and  the   related  consequences  for  ‘not  responding’.   27  
  28. 28. 20/02/2013   We  are  in  trouble!  •  We  need  to  do  things  differently:   –  Doing  more  of  the  same;   –  Doing  the  same  more  efficiently;   –  Doing  things  totally  differently.  •  Could  be  a  combinaCon  of  all  three,  or  one   could  be  dominant;  •  This  is  all  about  the  ‘ownership’  that  is  needed   to  make  the  turnaround.   Three  Levels  of  ExpectaCons  •  Adhere  to  the  compliance  requirements,  such   as  the  80%  learner  achievement  level  (bojom   25%);  •  To  be  compeCCve  in  order  to  be  part  of  those   bejer  that  the  average  (mediocre)  (middle   50%);  •  To  be  part  of  the  top  performers  (top  25%).   28  
  29. 29. 20/02/2013   Four  levels  of  School  FuncConality   1.  High  performing  schools  –  all  learners  are  passing;  it   more  about  how  they  pass  (top  20%  of  schools);   2.  Under-­‐performing  schools  –  the  success  of  learners  is   ’50-­‐50’  (next  50%  of  schools  -­‐  perform  between  50%   and  79%);   3.  Dysfunc.onal  schools  –  majority  of  learners  fail  at   these  schools  (next  20%  of  schools  –  perform   between  30%  and  49%);   4.  Chao.c  schools  –  most  of  the  learners  fail  at  these   schools  (next  10%  of  schools  –  performance  between   0%  and  29%).   % Different Types of schools in SA Quality  of  Pass  (Grades)   100% 90% 80% 70% 60%QuanCty  of  Pass   50% 40% 20%   30% 20% 50%   10% 0% 20%   -10% -20% 10%   Anti- Dysfunctional Under- High- Functional Performing Performing 29  
  30. 30. 20/02/2013   4.1.4  Levels  of  OperaCon   1800  hours    •  High  FuncConing  schools  =  1800  hours  +;  •  Under-­‐performing  schools  =  1800  hours  (work   to  rule);  •  DysfuncConal  schools  =  1800  hours  -­‐;  •  ChaoCc  schools  =  1400  hours  -­‐.   4.1.5  LegislaCve  Confusion  •  1800  hours  per  annum  (PAM);  •  200  school  days  per  annum;  •  27.5  hours  (Secondary  schools)  noConal  hours   per  week;  •  7  hours  (at  least)  per  day  (Employment  of   Educators  Act);  •  5.5  hours  teaching  Cme  per  day.   30  
  31. 31. 20/02/2013   Three Steps to Quality Education Dys- Step  1   Under- Step  2   High Step   Excellent 3   functional performing Functioning Schools Schools Schools Schools Basic Right To Basic Education Quality Education Education Legal and Human Rights Professional, Social, and Obligations Ethical Obligations 61 Confusing Teaching for Learning Teaching   Facilita.on  of  Learning   Learning     (the  Teacher)   (teacher  and  learner)   (the  learner)  Facts  and   Know-­‐how  building   Comprehension  and  InformaCon   Wisdom  development  sharing  Audifying  of   Engaging  in  the  process  of   What  do  you  know  Textbook   learning  in  order  to  ensure   and  understand,  and   ownership  of  the  knowledge   not  just  what  do  you   remember  CharacterisCcs  of   InvesCgate  the  opinions  of   Discuss  the  a  good  ciCzen   others  (including  yourself)   characterisCcs  of  a   on  the  topic   good  ciCzen,  with   jusCficaCon  Assessment  of   Assessment  for  Learning   Assessment  of  Teaching   Learning   62 31  
  32. 32. 20/02/2013  Connected vs Disconnectednessfrom Learners I  see,  know,   understand   and  care  about   them!   I  see,  know   and   understand   them!   I  see  and  know   them!   I  see  them!   63 What  is   going  on?   32  
  33. 33. 20/02/2013   What  should   have   happened?  What  is  our  new  operaConal  approach,  and  what  will  be   the  consequences  for  ‘not   responding’?   *  Developmental;   *  Judgmental.   33  
  34. 34. 20/02/2013   Turnaround  Progression  Diagram   OrganisaConal   Change   Self-­‐Empowerment   Tools  and  Processes   Self-­‐MoCvaCon   Desire  to  Turn  things  around   Know  that  the  Turnaround  is  Possible   Factors  influencing  Turnarounds   RATIONAL  FACTORS   INSPIRATIONAL  FACTORS   Objec.ve,  Controllable   Subjec.ve,  Emo.onal,  Vola.le  •  There  is  a  case  for  the   •  Visibility  of  the  educaConal   school  to  turnaround,   leaders  passionate  about  the   given  the  current  context;   turnaround;  •  Analysis,  metrics,   •  Staff  members  are  parCcipaCng   supporCng  data;   and  impacCng  on  the  •  There  is  a  turnaround   turnaround  process;   strategy  and  supporCve   •  All  the  stakeholders  know   staff  team;   ‘what’s  in  it  for  me?’,  and  •  Outcome  of  the   acknowledge  and  know  it.   turnaround  is  achievable.   34  
  35. 35. 20/02/2013   35  
  36. 36. 20/02/2013  Student  ExpectaCon  and  Achievement  agreement  (1)  Student  ExpectaCon  and  Achievement  agreement  (1)   36  
  37. 37. 20/02/2013  Student  ExpectaCon  and  Achievement  agreement  (1)  Student  ExpectaCon  and  Achievement  agreement  (1)   37  
  38. 38. 20/02/2013  Student  ExpectaCon  and  Achievement  agreement  (1)  Student  ExpectaCon  and  Achievement  agreement  (2)   38  
  39. 39. 20/02/2013  Student  ExpectaCon  and  Achievement  agreement  (2)  Student  ExpectaCon  and  Achievement  agreement  (2)   39  
  40. 40. 20/02/2013  Student  ExpectaCon  and  Achievement  agreement  (1)   2011   2012   Gap   Q1   English     76   85   9   -­‐2   Afrikaans     75   80   5   -­‐0   Mathema.cs     71   90   19   -­‐3   Physical  Science   81   85   4   -­‐0   Engineering  and   52   70   18   -­‐2   Graphic  Design   Life  Orienta.on   84   90   6   +2   Electrical   66   75   9   -­‐2   Technology   40  
  41. 41. 20/02/2013  Feedback  from  Principal  of  JOTHS     41  
  42. 42. 20/02/2013   83Sechaba  Results  2012   42  
  43. 43. 20/02/2013   Conclusion  –  IntegraCng  Challenges  •  Learners  –  creaCng  a  dream,  not  a  ‘pass’  (below  or  above   50%);  •  Learners  –  focusing  on  the  achievement  of  their  dream   (assisCng  them,  not  our  image);  •  Teachers  –  relaConship  agreement  between  teachers  and   learners  (engagement  based  on  an  agreement);  •  Teachers  –  assisCng  learners  to  achieve  their  dream,  not   theirs;  •  Principals  –  know  what  they  are  ‘producing’  at  the  school;  •  Principal  –  encourage  and  ensure  conCnuum  from  school  to   ‘next  step  towards  dream’;  •  District  –  would  know  what  they  are  ‘producing’  within  the   circuit,  district,  etc.;  •  District  –  plan  accordingly  to  deliver  on  the  aspiraCons.   Session  6   Wrapping  Up   43  
  44. 44. 20/02/2013   Key  QuesCons  1.  IdenCfy  the  learning  that  took  place.  2.  IdenCfy  what  will  be  done  since  we  know   more  about  the  issue.  3.  What  are  we  going  to  do  MORE,  BETTER,  and   DIFFERENTLY?  4.  How  do  we  keep  each  other  accountable?  5.  What  should  life  (the  school)  be  like  this  Cme   next  year?   88 44  
  45. 45. 20/02/2013  Thank  You!   45  

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