The Pedagogy of PowerPoint

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Power corrupts. It's rude to point. Combine the two - power, point - and the results can be downright disastrous. It doesn't have to be that way.

The Pedagogy of PowerPoint shows you what to do (and what not to do) in your next presentation. You'll learn:

* How to stop using bullet points in presentations (don't worry, you can still use them in course descriptions).
* Where to find inspiration for your next presentation.
* Why it's important to rev up your presentation prowess.
* How to utilize screen real estate and physical space for maximum impact.
* And much more.

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  • I do have just one more housekeeping item to go over with you.
  • The first is about the WebEx software we’re using. You can ask a question at anytime using the chat window at the bottom right side of the screen. You can also change the look of your screen by opening or closing the windows to the right using the arrows, sliding this bar to the right or left, or by expanding or reducing your screen using the tools in the bottom left.
  • And that is,I encourage you to get out your smart phones. This presentation will utilize Quick Response, or QR, Codes, and if you have a QR code reader on your smart phone, you can scan the code for additional content and ideas.
  • Bullet points
  • …your seat cushion can be used as a flotation device.
  • So this is actually a brand new addition to this presentation which I came across today when I was looking to infuse some exclusive new content into this presentation for you, and it pretty much sums up every reason why you shouldn’t use bullet points in your presentation.Right there on the screen you can see that bullet points are just kind of flat and boring. They certainly don’t do much to engage the senses or excite participants, do they? Lots of times people use too much text when they’re using bullet points.And another thing to keep in mind – well – people read faster than presenters can talk. How many of you have already read this slide and you’re ready to start checking your email as I keep talking?
  • One of the first trends I want to show you is why you should stay away from bullet points in your next presentation. Let’s take a look at an example.
  • You could end up like this. And nobody wants to end up like this.
  • Bullet points
  • Not this KISS. How did this get here? Shelly, did you put this in my slide deck?
  • Go.I cringe when I see presentations like this. I know there’s a story somewhere in there, but my poor little overworked brain can’t find it. As a participant, I want you to make it easy for me.
  • Make your story stand out for me so I don’t have to think so hard about what’s going on in your slide and I can focus on you.
  • That’s not to say the narrative isn’t important. It is – the storytelling component is GOOD. The story here is GOOD. Not bestseller good, but good. It includes sensory details and takes the audience on a relatable journey. If you take OhioNet’s workshop with Ruth Millilgan on storytelling, you’ll learn why these details are good to include (shelly, when’s that coming up?)But the story goes into your notes, not on the screen.
  • On the left is Steve Jobs, at a product launch presentation for…apple computers. On the right, Mr. Gates has returned and is still talking about all the things Windows Live should be able to do.It’s really uncanny how different their two approaches are – ASK: What are the major differences you see?ANSWERS MAY INCLUDE: Jobs’ is simpler, more direct; Gates’ is full to the brim, almost chaotic and overloaded.You can see that Gates’ presentation is definitely busier than Jobs’, perhaps overwhelming the audience with visual and auditory information, whereas Jobs’ presentation is much simpler, cleaner, and direct. Gates’ clip art might be relevant, but it’s overused. The trend now is to stick with one major idea per slide, with one major graphic to help support it – less is more.
  • Clipart is Cliché.Let’s play a game. I’ll flash a word on the screen, and you tell me what image everybody uses for it (including you and me, because we’re all guilty of it) – I want the most common, clichéd metaphor for the word. Use the chat box to type in your responses.Ready?
  • Let’s start with an easy one.Idea – (response – “light bulb”)
  • Let’s start with an easy one.Idea – (response – “light bulb”)
  • What about teamwork? (Response – “puzzle”)
  • What about teamwork? (Response – “puzzle”)
  • How about “Any questions”? (Response – “Question mark”)Of course, many of us DO have a question mark that floats over our heads…especially when we’ve just sat through a really bad presentation. Maybe this one isn’t so far off, after all.
  • How about “Any questions”? (Response – “Question mark”)Of course, many of us DO have a question mark that floats over our heads…especially when we’ve just sat through a really bad presentation. Maybe this one isn’t so far off, after all.
  • So when IS the last time you sat down with a jigsaw puzzle at a staff meeting? When’s the last time you had an idea, just as the electricity came on in the morning? Are the questions you want from your audience centered around the rules of punctuation? No?Then why use these images on your slides?We were able to come up with these answers pretty quickly together, which means we’ve seen them all before. They’re common. They’re forgettable. Why not try something new to really grab your audience’s attention? Here’s the deal, folks. I’m not saying all clipart is “wrong” or “bad,” or that there isn’t ever a place for common metaphors (of course there is – otherwise they wouldn’t be “common”), but my challenge to you is to think twice before you start searching for your next image. You can do this simply by asking yourself, “How does this image enhance this slide?” Soon you’ll start asking yourself, “How does this image enhance my presentation?” If the image does neither, then, why take up space with it?Now…how many of you have handshake clip art you might re-consider before you present again? ;)
  • …so what do you think I was doing when this screen was being displayed. Do you think I was paying attention or do you think I was checking emails? What would *you* do? If you’re presenting a webinar and your slides look like this, what do you think your audience will do?Let’s just say I got a lot of emails answered during that session.
  • Another source of inspiration comes at you at least weekly, often on Sundays. Does anyone know? There’s a hint for you in the corner here.
  • A word on copyright…
  • It’s best to avoid trouble in that area. Cite your sources, ask permission, or…
  • Do it yourself. We’re in the digital age, and there are many resources available that can teach you how to do these things yourself.
  • Which I thought would be worthy of launching into the internet with recorded audio.
  • But one of the reasons Kirstin is such an awesome librarian is because she didn’t let this answer stop her.
  • Kirstin went back to the drawing board
  • And came up with a newer, better, and even awesomer presentation with customized characters.
  • Kirstin took the DIY concept to heart and created an entire series of animated figures like this one.
  • I wish I could clone Kirstin and send her out to each of you. I know not everyone is as lucky as we are to have an in-house photoshop expert. But with the tips I mentioned earlier about noticing inspiration in billboards, album art, you can find your own sources of inspiration if you just take the time to notice them.
  • I’m lucky to work with Laura Solomon, who was voted one of Library Journal’s Movers & Shakers in 2010.She recently gave a class to me and the other HTML content editors of the State Library on writing better web content.
  • Keep in mind this is a very Steamboat Willie approach to using PPT animations. I’m not an expert here
  • Outline your thoughts and start with a blank canvas the next time you need to create a presentation. If you need more ideas,
  • The Pedagogy of PowerPoint

    1. 1. | this is powerpoint. |
    2. 2. Hi.
    3. 3. (the takeaway tweets.) use your smartphone to tweet with me
    4. 4. my name is matthew dyer. @mtthwdyr #LIBppt
    5. 5. i work here.@statelibohio
    6. 6. this is powerpoint.
    7. 7. you may love it.
    8. 8. you may hate it.
    9. 9. you may love to hate it.
    10. 10. why? that.? is it’s not rhetorical.
    11. 11. powerpoint can beconfusing
    12. 12. presentations can be boring
    13. 13. this is powerpoint.
    14. 14. this is powerpoint.(it doesn’t have to stink.)
    15. 15. intentions.Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    16. 16. document creation.Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    17. 17. document creation.Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    18. 18. teleprompting. How many of you have attended presentations where the leader of the discussion reads, word for excruciating word, exactly what is written on the slide? How many of you found this to be stimulating? How many of you found this to stretch your thinking and hold your attention span? How many of you would rather eat dry, three-day old toast?Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    19. 19. teleprompting. How many of you have attended presentations where the leader of the discussion reads, word for excruciating word, exactly what is written on the slide? How many of you found this to be stimulating? How many of you found this to stretch your thinking and hold your attention span? How many of you would rather eat dry, three-day old toast?Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    20. 20. intentions.Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    21. 21. intentions.Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    22. 22. intentions.Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    23. 23. presentations.Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    24. 24. put the power backinto powerpoint.
    25. 25. how?it’s easier than you think.
    26. 26. 1 2 3 4 56 7 than you think. it’s easier 8 9 10
    27. 27. matthew’s methods*.*Matthew is not a graphic designer nor is he a librarian.Matthew’s methods come from a variety of differentsources which have been cited. Rarely, if ever, is a methodpresented actually Matthew’s, but he did go through thetrouble of compiling them for you, so please don’t sue him.He’s a nice guy.
    28. 28. 1matthew’s methods.
    29. 29. Bullet Points • This is a Bullet Point • Boring – And linear and hierarchical • Very often bullet points are way too long • Reading is faster than talking – That’s why you’re already here – I’m probably notFrom: “PR agencies are obsessed with bullet points” by Tim Dyson
    30. 30. Bullet Points • This is a Bullet Point • Boring – And linear and hierarchical • Very often bullet points are way too long • Reading is faster than talking – That’s why you’re already here – I’m probably notFrom: “PR agencies are obsessed with bullet points” by Tim Dyson
    31. 31. how effective is this presentation?Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte Image via Flickr user niallkennedy
    32. 32. Image via Flickr user cogdogblog
    33. 33. (the takeaway tweet.) bullet points are soooo Windows 95
    34. 34. 2matthew’s methods.
    35. 35. less is more.
    36. 36. keepitshort &simple. Image via eNR Services, Inc.
    37. 37. Yawning, and smearing my eyes with my fingers, I walked bleary eyed into thekitchen and grabbed the kettle, unhooking it from the cord. I turned the tap anddrew fresh water, checking with my hands to make sure it was cold enough (thebest tea comes from the coldest water!). I filled the kettle as I glanced outsidefor a minute across the city mist. I could almost taste the grey. The kettle washalf full, so I switched the tap off and returned it to its socket. I flicked the powerswitch on and sifted through the cupboards, looking for biscuits. Anything aboveloose crumbs would do. Thankfully I found some fusty digestives. For somereason, biscuits are nicer always nicer when theyre theyve gone a bit dry andstale. I reached over and opened the fridge, retrieving the milk. I poured a littleinto a mug at the same time as grabbing the mug from the cupboard andplacing it on the surface. This is a technique I made that doesnt really save anytime, but makes me feel clever. The kettle began grumbling fiercely so I took itfrom the cord, threw a teabag into my cup and poured boiling water onto it. Iwatched brown swirls rise up and through the muted white of milky water. A fewminutes passed. I removed and squeezed the teabag, then flicked it into thebin. I picked up my mug and left the kitchen with a nice, hot cup of strong tea.Adapted from: “Telescopic Text” by Joe Davis
    38. 38. Yawning, and smearing my eyes with my fingers, I walked bleary eyed into thekitchen and grabbed the kettle, unhooking it from the cord. I turned the tap anddrew fresh water, checking with my hands to make sure it was cold enough (thebest tea comes from the coldest water!). I filled the kettle as I glanced outsidefor a minute across the city mist. I could almost taste the grey. The kettle washalf full, so I switched the tap off and returned it to its socket. I flicked the powerswitch on and sifted through the cupboards, looking for biscuits. Anything aboveloose crumbs would do. Thankfully I found some fusty digestives. For somereason, biscuits are nicer always nicer when theyre theyve gone a bit dry andstale. I reached over and opened the fridge, retrieving the milk. I poured a littleinto a mug at the same time as grabbing the mug from the cupboard andplacing it on the surface. This is a technique I made that doesnt really save anytime, but makes me feel clever. The kettle began grumbling fiercely so I took itfrom the cord, threw a teabag into my cup and poured boiling water onto it. Iwatched brown swirls rise up and through the muted white of milky water. A fewminutes passed. I removed and squeezed the teabag, then flicked it into thebin. I picked up my mug and left the kitchen with a nice, hot cup of strong tea.Adapted from: “Telescopic Text” by Joe Davis
    39. 39. Adapted from: “Telescopic Text” by Joe Davis
    40. 40. i made tea.
    41. 41. Adapted from: “Gates, Jobs & the Zen aesthetic” by Garr Reynolds
    42. 42. (the takeaway tweet.) less is more; shorter is sweeter
    43. 43. 3matthew’s methods.
    44. 44. clipart is cliché .Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    45. 45. ideaAdapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    46. 46. ideaAdapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    47. 47. teamworkAdapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    48. 48. teamworkAdapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    49. 49. questionsAdapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    50. 50. questionsAdapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte
    51. 51. “If you feel tempted to use apicture of two hands shaking infront of a globe, put the pencildown, step away from the desk,and think about taking avacation or investigatingaromatherapy.” -Nancy Duarte, in Presentation Zen by Garr Reynolds
    52. 52. (the takeaway tweet.) clipart is caca
    53. 53. 4matthew’s methods.
    54. 54. don’t be afraid of white spaceEllen Finklestein, author of 101 Tips Every PowerPoint User Should Know
    55. 55. …or blue space.
    56. 56. how effective is this presentation? Image via Flickr user mathoovAdapted from: “Gates, Jobs & the Zen aesthetic” by Garr Reynolds
    57. 57. (the takeaway tweet.) white space is a fine frontier
    58. 58. 5matthew’s methods.
    59. 59. don‘t let webinars become a trap.
    60. 60. how effective is this presentation?
    61. 61. how effective is this presentation?
    62. 62. thevirtualpresenter.com
    63. 63. (the takeaway tweet.) woe to the weary webinar presenter
    64. 64. 6matthew’s methods.
    65. 65. Image via Orange Barrel Media
    66. 66. Image via Orange Barrel Media
    67. 67. Image via Orange Barrel Media
    68. 68. Reasons Garfield Hates Mondays• They start with “M”.• They aren’t Fridays.• They sneak up on you.• They have a bad reputation.• They crush the human spirit.• They crush the feline spirit.• They don’t crush the canines.
    69. 69. Reasons Garfield Hates Mondays• They start with “M”.• They aren’t Fridays.• They sneak up on you.• They have a bad reputation.• They crush the human spirit.• They crush the feline spirit.• They don’t crush the canines.
    70. 70. You stole that image!
    71. 71. ask for permission
    72. 72. or D-I-Y.
    73. 73. asking for permission
    74. 74. awesomely creative librarian
    75. 75. awesomely creative preso
    76. 76. awesomely sincere ask
    77. 77. awesomely aggravating answer
    78. 78. (the takeaway tweet.) presentation inspiration ain’t a source of perspiration
    79. 79. 7matthew’s methods.
    80. 80. state the headline (not the obvious).Adapted from: “Writing for the Web” by Laura Solomon
    81. 81. Good: The library has storytimeAdapted from: “Writing for the Web” by Laura Solomon
    82. 82. Good: The library has storytime Better: Why your child needs storytimeAdapted from: “Writing for the Web” by Laura Solomon
    83. 83. Good: The library has storytime Better: Why your child needs storytime Best: How to increase your child’s literacyAdapted from: “Writing for the Web” by Laura Solomon
    84. 84. This Slide Is About Our Library • The library has books • The library has internet • The library has classes • The library has databases • The library has storytime • The library serves people • The library serves a LOT of peopleAdapted from: “Writing for the Web” by Laura Solomon
    85. 85. This Slide Is About Our Library • The library has books • The library has internet • The library has classes • The library has databases • The library has storytime • The library serves people • The library serves a LOT of peopleAdapted from: “Writing for the Web” by Laura Solomon
    86. 86. Our Library Increases Literacy
    87. 87. i made tea.
    88. 88. How to Warm your Soul
    89. 89. (the takeaway tweet.) headlines sell better than flatlines
    90. 90. matthew’s methods. 8
    91. 91. it’s okay to take shortcuts.
    92. 92. they look like this
    93. 93. and save lots of this
    94. 94. (the takeaway tweet.) use shortcuts; every second counts
    95. 95. matthew’s methods. 9
    96. 96. animations &transitions cancreate motion
    97. 97. & continue ideas.
    98. 98. Introduction Good morning and thank you for letting me be here. Today I’m going to talk to you about using Microsoft PowerPoint. I’ll give you 10 tips that I’ve collected which are helpful for me, and might be just as helpful for you.
    99. 99. Introduction Good morning and thank you for letting me be here. Today I’m going to talk to you about using Microsoft PowerPoint. I’ll give you 10 tips that I’ve collected which are helpful for me, and might be just as helpful for you.
    100. 100. (the takeaway tweet.) use animations & transitions cautiously
    101. 101. matthew’s methods. 10
    102. 102. trash the default.
    103. 103. start with a blank canvas.
    104. 104. read.
    105. 105. practice.
    106. 106. matthew’s methods.
    107. 107. Bullet Points Are Boring matthew’s methods.
    108. 108. Bullet Points Are Boring Less is More matthew’s methods.
    109. 109. Bullet Points Are Boring Less is More ClipArt is Cliché matthew’s methods.
    110. 110. Bullet Points Are BoringDon’t Be Afraid Less is More of White Space ClipArt is Cliché matthew’s methods.
    111. 111. Bullet Points Are BoringDon’t Be Afraid Less is More of White Space ClipArt is Cliché Avoid Webinar Traps matthew’s methods.
    112. 112. Bullet Points Are BoringDon’t Be Afraid Less is More of White Space ClipArt is Cliché Avoid Webinar Traps Inspiration is Everywhere matthew’s methods.
    113. 113. Bullet Points Are BoringDon’t Be Afraid Less is More of White Space ClipArt is Cliché Avoid Webinar Traps Inspiration is Everywhere State the Headline matthew’s methods.
    114. 114. Bullet Points Are BoringDon’t Be Afraid Less is More of White Space ClipArt is Cliché Avoid Webinar Traps Inspiration is Everywhere State the Headline matthew’s methods. It’s OK to Take Shortcuts
    115. 115. Bullet Points Are BoringDon’t Be Afraid Less is More of White Space ClipArt is Cliché Avoid Webinar Traps Inspiration is Everywhere State the Headline matthew’s methods. It’s OK to Take Shortcuts Animations Create Motion
    116. 116. Bullet Points Are BoringDon’t Be Afraid Less is More of White Space ClipArt is Cliché Avoid Webinar Traps Inspiration is Everywhere State the Headline matthew’s methods. It’s OK to Take Shortcuts Animations Create Motion Trash the Default
    117. 117. 10 waysto keep this
    118. 118. from turninginto this.
    119. 119. my name is matthew dyer. @mtthwdyr #LIBppt
    120. 120. | this was powerpoint. |
    121. 121. Sometimes it’srude to point.

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